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Black Models

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NEWS
August 7, 1991 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
The New York Department of Consumer Affairs recently charged that although blacks make up 11 percent of national magazine readership, only 3 percent of models used in national ads are black. Changing this should not be a problem. Though some blacks find work in television advertising, they are seen far less often in national magazines ads. What's the sense in complaining about such practices if you're unwilling to do anything about it? I'm damned tired of black models complaining about discrimination in advertising by major magazines.
LIVING
October 31, 1996 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Ralph Lauren, the designer who mined the WASPy lifestyle in creating a multibillion-dollar worldwide corporation, shocked the fashion throngs yesterday when he presented an entire collection inspired by Africa and, for the first time, used many black models. It was as startling as someone hiring black actors as regulars for Melrose Place or the Friends crew suddenly developing friendships with African Americans. Lauren has long been accused of concocting a countried world of plaids, tweeds and horsey clothes inhabited only by blondes.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1992 | By Jeff Brown, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Who wears Calvin Klein jeans? Who washes with Clairol shampoo? Who uses Estee Lauder cosmetics? And who works out with NordicTrack? Only white people? A study of 1,793 advertisements published in 10 major magazines has found a continuation of the long-standing practice of portraying America as almost exclusively white, according to the New York City Department of Consumer Affairs. The department's study focused on 14 major advertisers, finding that seven of them had used no black models in any of the hundreds of ads they had placed in Esquire, Vogue, Sports Illustrated, Time and other magazines.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2016 | By Elizabeth Wellington, FASHION COLUMNIST
Ade Jaiye has modeled for nearly a decade. However, it wasn't until last year that Jaiye, lauded for her ebony skin and close-cropped natural hair, was cast in shows where she didn't feel like the "exotic" one. "My look is more accepted in this industry as a whole," said Jaiye of Old City, who regularly models jewelry, cosmetics, and apparel for QVC in West Chester. Jaiye also is the go-to model for the Joan Shepp brand, and in February, Jaiye modeled in the New York Fashion Week runway presentation of celebrity stylist and designer Kithe Brewster.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1991 | By Barbara Demick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Racism is prevalent in magazine advertising, the city's Department of Consumer Affairs charged yesterday in a study that is already provoking an uproar in the publishing and advertising industries. The study found that blacks accounted for only 3 percent of the models depicted in national magazine advertisements, although they made up 11 percent of the readers. The worst offender was Esquire magazine, the study said; only 2.4 percent of the models in its ads were black despite the fact that more than 25 percent of its readers were black, the study found.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The latest issues of our favorite women's magazines are filled with high-fashion ads featuring beautiful - dare I say, aspirational - African American women. Rihanna, dressed in funky, oversized pink herringbone checks by designer Olivier Rousteing, is the face of Balmain's spring 2014 campaign. Riccardo Tisci selected not one but two chocolate-toned ladies - neo-soul singer Erykah Badu and runway newcomer Riley - to model his Japanese silhouettes and African-inspired prints for Givenchy.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Big tobacco hasn't violated federal anti-discrimination laws by saturating the African-American community with ads promoting menthol cigarettes, a federal judge in Philadelphia ruled yesterday. Laws banning racial discrimination don't prohibit such advertising, U.S. District Judge John R. Padova ruled. A local minister and others claimed that such "intensive" advertising adversely affects blacks, "who are dying at greater rates" than whites because of smoking menthol products.
NEWS
February 11, 2008 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Designers Marc Jacobs and Sean "Diddy" Combs ended the New York Fashion Week hoopla with major statements. Jacobs, who is known industry-wide for his two-hour delays, started his show on time. And all of Combs' models were black to underscore a point. Celebrity-packed audiences viewed both these buzz-heavy shows at venues away from the Bryant Park tents. Arrivals at the Friday night shows included Victoria "Posh Spice" Beckham, Kevin Federline and Ellen Pompeo. The Sean John collection offered Combs' return to Fashion Week after a five-year hiatus.
LIVING
January 1, 1993 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story includes information from the Associated Press, Reuters, the Los Angeles Times, the Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel and USA Today
Michael Jackson has picked a white boy to play a younger version of himself in a new Pepsi commercial, according to the New York Post. The TV ad, for outside-U.S.A. audiences only, will feature the pop star singing his old hit, "I'll Be There. " Producers wanted him to perform with himself as a member of the Jackson Five. But, the paper says, such a contrast would show up Jackson's decade-long efforts to remake himself via plastic surgery and skin bleaching. It quotes an unnamed source as saying that the white boy was fitted with an Afro wig, had his skin darkened through video colorization and needed matte artists to put plastic cells on his face to make him look more like Jackson.
NEWS
September 14, 2008 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
With freshly blushed cheeks and smoothed-back tresses, 19-year-old Sessilee Lopez walked to the clothing racks backstage at the Anna Sui fashion show, curious about which Spring 2009 looks the designer planned to send her out in. To her surprise, not only was she to be featured in three teeny, tiny Mexican-art-inspired ensembles, but she also would be the second to walk Sui's runway, behind supermodel Agyness Deyn. "Uh, yeah! This is a big deal," said the West Philadelphia-born Lopez, taking little jumps of joy. Sui is known throughout the industry for using the hot models of the moment to open and close her New York Fashion Week presentations.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2016 | By Elizabeth Wellington, FASHION COLUMNIST
Ade Jaiye has modeled for nearly a decade. However, it wasn't until last year that Jaiye, lauded for her ebony skin and close-cropped natural hair, was cast in shows where she didn't feel like the "exotic" one. "My look is more accepted in this industry as a whole," said Jaiye of Old City, who regularly models jewelry, cosmetics, and apparel for QVC in West Chester. Jaiye also is the go-to model for the Joan Shepp brand, and in February, Jaiye modeled in the New York Fashion Week runway presentation of celebrity stylist and designer Kithe Brewster.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The latest issues of our favorite women's magazines are filled with high-fashion ads featuring beautiful - dare I say, aspirational - African American women. Rihanna, dressed in funky, oversized pink herringbone checks by designer Olivier Rousteing, is the face of Balmain's spring 2014 campaign. Riccardo Tisci selected not one but two chocolate-toned ladies - neo-soul singer Erykah Badu and runway newcomer Riley - to model his Japanese silhouettes and African-inspired prints for Givenchy.
NEWS
May 18, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Columnist
Why would a reputable website like Psychology Today post evolutionary psychologist Satoshi Kanazawa's unfounded study, provocatively titled "Why Black Women Are Less Physically Attractive Than Other Women"? Was it simply "driving web traffic" psychology? It couldn't have been the soundness of the study, which basically asked random people to rate the attractiveness of other random people on a scale of 1 to 5. Was the subsequent conclusion - that black men are actually considered the most attractive - proof that Kanazawa, known for his controversial and questionable scientific conclusions, is not a racist?
NEWS
February 9, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
There was a time when most African American women didn't know who Yves St. Laurent was, let alone believe they could ever own a crisp YSL pantsuit. But that was before Eunice W. Johnson. Johnson, who died a little more than a year ago, spent more than 50 years introducing all things fashionable, fabulous, and fly to brown-skinned belles, first with her husband, John, by founding Ebony and Jet magazines, and then through her runway show, the Ebony Fashion Fair. Billed as the world's largest traveling fashion show - in its heyday the extravaganza stopped in 170 cities - the show featured more than 200 over-the-top, colorful and avant-garde looks worn by black models at a time when African Americans were still banned from basic privileges like trying on department-store clothes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2010 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
IF YOU WERE going to march in a Black History Month parade at your grade school, there are hundreds of famous figures whose pictures you could proudly carry. Nelson Mandela, for instance, or Sidney Poitier, Marian Anderson, Jackie Robinson or Rosa Parks. Muhammad Ali. Halle Berry. Thurgood Marshall. Condoleezza Rice. Meadowlark Lemon. Harriet Tubman. Denzel Washington. Kenny Gamble or Leon Huff. Some fellow named Barack Obama could be a good choice. But three teachers at L.A.'s Wadsworth Elementary School have been suspended for the pictures they handed out to children for their parade: O.J. Simpson, Dennis Rodman and RuPaul.
NEWS
September 14, 2008 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
With freshly blushed cheeks and smoothed-back tresses, 19-year-old Sessilee Lopez walked to the clothing racks backstage at the Anna Sui fashion show, curious about which Spring 2009 looks the designer planned to send her out in. To her surprise, not only was she to be featured in three teeny, tiny Mexican-art-inspired ensembles, but she also would be the second to walk Sui's runway, behind supermodel Agyness Deyn. "Uh, yeah! This is a big deal," said the West Philadelphia-born Lopez, taking little jumps of joy. Sui is known throughout the industry for using the hot models of the moment to open and close her New York Fashion Week presentations.
NEWS
February 11, 2008 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Designers Marc Jacobs and Sean "Diddy" Combs ended the New York Fashion Week hoopla with major statements. Jacobs, who is known industry-wide for his two-hour delays, started his show on time. And all of Combs' models were black to underscore a point. Celebrity-packed audiences viewed both these buzz-heavy shows at venues away from the Bryant Park tents. Arrivals at the Friday night shows included Victoria "Posh Spice" Beckham, Kevin Federline and Ellen Pompeo. The Sean John collection offered Combs' return to Fashion Week after a five-year hiatus.
NEWS
January 9, 2005 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Ash - flaky skin that looks like chipped, white paint spread on elbows and knees and smattered in the creases of fingers and toes. These areas have a tendency to be dry on everyone, especially during the cold winter months. But on black people, ash is a bigger aesthetic nuisance. Unchecked, it elicits taunts from school-aged children - "Why you look like you been kickin' flour?" - and admonishment from mothers everywhere. "Girl, get in this house right now and put some lotion on those ashy legs of yours.
NEWS
April 23, 2000 | By Leonard N. Fleming, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a teacher in Philadelphia schools, Bill Smith sees the struggle with black youth. "It's all over the country, the kids' behavior, the way they are acting," he said. Smith was among about 100 men and a handful of women yesterday who attended the African American Male Empowerment Summit held at Temple University to address the lives of blacks through mentoring, relationship building and economic opportunities. Smith, 54, attended the conference to learn more about how to be a better mentor to his students at West Philadelphia High School.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Big tobacco hasn't violated federal anti-discrimination laws by saturating the African-American community with ads promoting menthol cigarettes, a federal judge in Philadelphia ruled yesterday. Laws banning racial discrimination don't prohibit such advertising, U.S. District Judge John R. Padova ruled. A local minister and others claimed that such "intensive" advertising adversely affects blacks, "who are dying at greater rates" than whites because of smoking menthol products.
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