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Black Panther

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2007 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
"Black Panther" (aka T'Challa) was the first black superhero in mainstream comic-book history and remains one of the most prolific. He has long been one of the more popular members of Marvel's "Mightiest Heroes," the Avengers. But Marvel's various attempts to give the character his own title have ultimately failed - and one of the major reasons is that the character has never seemed integral to the Marvel Universe the way characters like Captain America and Spider-Man are. Until now. Thanks to writer Reggie Hudlin (director and writer of the movie "House Party")
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2005 | By JEROME MAIDA -- For the Daily News
JUST IN TIME for Black History Month, the Black Panther is back on the prowl in a new series that has comicdom's first black superhero roaring louder than ever. Reginald Hudlin, the director of successful projects on both the big and small screens ("House Party," "Boomerang," "The Bernie Mac Show") has joined with Marvel Comics to craft the further adventures of the "Black Panther. " So why is this accomplished mainstream director delving into the comic book industry and writing this title in particular?
NEWS
April 7, 1986 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a blood bath that, through a quirk in timing, is often forgotten when prison riots are recalled. Aug. 21, 1971. Six killed at San Quentin Prison in Northern California. Dead were three guards and three prisoners, including the nation's best-known inmate at the time, Black Panther and prison revolutionary George Jackson. But three weeks later, at a prison in a small town in New York State, the death toll was much higher - 32 prisoners and 11 hostages. A four-day siege by inmates ended when state troopers and police stormed the Attica State Correctional Facility.
NEWS
May 19, 1992 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
Are Black Panthers roaming the woods of Pennsylvania? Although many law enforcement agencies apparently didn't take the thought seriously, the state Game Commission did. A memo dated May 1 that the commission faxed to its wildlife conservation officers warned them of possible clashes with members of the long-defunct black militant organization in the aftermath of the Rodney King jury verdict that sparked the Los Angeles riots. While it might be hard to picture followers of the late Huey P. Newton confronting game wardens in rural Forest County, state game officials said they felt it was better to be safe than sorry.
NEWS
June 8, 1991 | By MUMIA ABU-JAMAL
Recently the reborn Black Panther newspaper rolled off the presses, chock- full of memories, some wonderful, some dark and others bittersweet. The Black Panther/Black Community News Service featured pictures, graphics and articles that reflect the glories of yesteryear alongside the grimness of today. The first issue featured critical tributes to fallen Panthers such as Huey P. Newton and Fred Hampton. Living ex-Panthers, now political prisoners, were covered, among them Ruchell Clinque Magee, sole survivor of the Marin County Courthouse Massacre of 1970; Geronimo ji-Jaga (Pratt)
NEWS
April 24, 1988 | By Bill Price, Inquirer Staff Writer
Though it didn't even happen on Friday the 13th, landscaper Thomas Wall is still spooked by the black cat that crossed his path the other day. The 24-year-old resident of Holland in Bucks County is not superstitious and wouldn't have blinked an eye except for the size of what he says he saw. "It was all black, three feet high and five feet long. " What was it? In a telephone interview two days after the unsettling incident, Wall insisted that he saw a "black panther" in Pennypack Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2012
IN THE AGE of Netflix, watching films can be a solitary pastime. Cinema 16 aims to make it a shared, engaging affair, and one that can never be experienced the same way twice. Tonight three silent, avant-garde films will be screened at International House, accompanied by a live performance of an original score. In previous incarnations, Cinema 16 musicians have ranged from an experimental cello player to the Yeah Yeah Yeahs. And the films have ranged from the 1920s to the 1980s, making each evening wildly different from the previous one. Cinema 16 is named for the post-World War II film society created by Amos Vogel in the West Village.
NEWS
October 16, 1997 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Police are tracking a 200-pound black panther that vanished from outside a Lahaska antique shop. But before you start slamming the doors and pulling the children and pets off the streets, you should know there's no real danger. The 4-foot-long feline is made of iron, and rather than slinking off, police said, it was apparently carted away by thieves sometime overnight Saturday. Its owner values the piece, made in the 1960s, at $4,500. Steve Houck, an employee of the Oaklawn Metal Craft Shop, Route 202, said the cat was one of a group of iron figures acquired about 10 years ago. "There's two giant giraffes still out there.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2001 | by Jerome Maida, Special to the Daily News
Martin King couldn't believe it. A comic-book hero called Black Panther. And black wasn't just the color of his superhero outfit. In the mid-'60s, this just didn't happen. Looking back now, King remembers the debut of the first black heroic character as "the coolest thing in the world. " "We were looking for characters that looked like ourselves," said King, an African-American who is co-owner of Showcase Comics on South Street. "You have to have heroes," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1994 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
After his blistering semiautobiography Straight Out of Brooklyn, Matty Rich takes a dive into The Inkwell, a nostalgic comedy set in Oak Bluffs, the predominantly black beach enclave on Martha's Vineyard. His uneven new film takes place during the Bicentennial summer of 1976, when unnatural fibers were in vogue, fashion victims (then as now) asserted that hip huggers and bell bottoms looked cool on non-sailors and Afros sprouted like halos on angels. But Rich is too thoughtful to make a movie merely inventorying America's garishly funny tastes of the moment.
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NEWS
November 15, 2014
THERE'S NOTHING I would like better than for cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal to shut his lying, mellifluous mouth. Infuriatingly, he won't. But is passing a so-called "Muzzle Mumia Law" the right remedy? Coming in response to France's favorite inmate addressing-on-tape some 20 dimwits getting degrees from Mumia's alma mater, Vermont's Goddard College, the Pennsylvania Legislature passed a bill allowing crime victims to sue to prevent inmates from making public statements causing "mental anguish.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
50 CENT (A/K/A CURTIS JACKSON) says he didn't attack his ex-girlfriend and didn't trash her condo. The "In da Club" singer's attorney says there's no warrant outstanding on the domestic violence and vandalism charges against his client. If convicted, he faces up to five years in jail and $46,000 in fines. The woman told police that during a June 23 argument, 50 Cent began breaking stuff at her Toluca Lake condo before she locked herself in a bedroom. She said the rapper kicked open the bedroom door and kicked her, causing injury.
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO & STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writers difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
KING SAMIR SHABAZZ says black people should create militias to exterminate whites, skin them alive, pour acid on them, sic pit bulls on them, bust their heads with rocks and even raid nurseries to "kill everything white in sight. " "I would love nothing more than to come home with a cracker's head in my book bag," Shabazz, a Philly street preacher and national field marshal for the New Black Panther Party, said on a black-power radio show. Such sentiment hasn't gotten him arrested.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer
THEY MAY BE back in black for Tuesday's election - the uber-controversial New Black Panther Party. But now with 100 percent less nightstick. You'll recall, especially if you've ever listened to conservative talk radio, that it was right here that the Election Day 2008 appearance of two local leaders of the smallish black-power posse outside a polling station at 12th and Fairmount in North Philadelphia - one brandishing a large nightstick -...
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer
FOR A POLITICAL movement that serves as a 50,000-watt boogeyman for conservative talk radio in America, finding your local representative of the New Black Panther Party is not easy. There's no party headquarters and no membership roll — just a doorbell at a modest brick home in the lawn-checkered, rebuilt stretch of North Philadelphia between the Temple campus and Center City. When King Samir Shabazz, the Philadelphia chairman of the New Black Panther Party, emerges, he agrees to an interview only if it can be conducted while he paces up and down the sidewalk out front.
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | By Will Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
BEFORE THERE WAS a New Black Panther Party, there was an old Black Panther Party. Launched on the streets of Oakland, Calif., in 1966 in response to complaints of widespread police brutality against African-Americans, the Black Panthers become an icon of the turbulent 1960s in a remarkably short time. Its leaders — including co-founders Bobby Seale, Huey Newton and Eldridge Cleaver — were nationally known figures at a time when it appeared that the American social order might come undone.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2012
IN THE AGE of Netflix, watching films can be a solitary pastime. Cinema 16 aims to make it a shared, engaging affair, and one that can never be experienced the same way twice. Tonight three silent, avant-garde films will be screened at International House, accompanied by a live performance of an original score. In previous incarnations, Cinema 16 musicians have ranged from an experimental cello player to the Yeah Yeah Yeahs. And the films have ranged from the 1920s to the 1980s, making each evening wildly different from the previous one. Cinema 16 is named for the post-World War II film society created by Amos Vogel in the West Village.
NEWS
December 18, 2011
J. Christian Adams is an election lawyer who served in the Voting Rights Section at the U.S. Department of Justice and is author of Injustice: Exposing the Racial Agenda of the Obama Justice Department Most who have seen the video of the New Black Panthers standing in front of a Philadelphia polling place in 2008 have well-settled opinions about the matter. However, with the presidential election next year, and with the injunction that barred the baton-wielding King Samir Shabazz from appearing at city polling places set to expire, it's worth considering some facts you might not have heard before.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2011 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
J ustice is just another word for "my side is the right side," and this vexed and vexing struggle is at the center of In a Daughter's Eyes , an engrossing new A. Zell Williams play whose world premiere ends InterAct Theatre Company's season. "Hate you can't turn off - it's like a leaky faucet," and these two daughters have had their lives defined by hatred. Rehema (Lynnette R. Freeman) is the daughter of a Black Panther, imprisoned on death row for years for the murder of a policeman, father of Kathryn (Krista Apple)
NEWS
March 21, 2011
Donald L. Cox, 74, a member of the Black Panther Party high command who earned a moment of celebrity in 1970 when he spoke at a Leonard Bernstein fund-raising party in Manhattan made notorious by the writer Tom Wolfe in his article "Radical Chic: That Party at Lenny's," died Feb. 19 at his home in Camps-sur-l'Agly, France. His wife, Barbara Cox Easley, did not specify a cause. He had lived abroad since the early 1970s, when he fled the United States after being implicated in a Baltimore murder.
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