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Black Panther Party

NEWS
July 30, 2007
I'D LIKE TO respond to Samir Shabazz of the New Black Panther Party and South Philly shooting of Tykeem Law by Charles Meyers. Shabazz claims the shooting was racially motivated. I have one comment for that: What? Tykeem Law was allegedly shot because he didn't get out of the way fast enough. Even though I think this was wrong, it was far from a racial issue. Come on and get real, Shabazz. Bhoke S. Lumumba Philadelphia
NEWS
September 25, 2010
WASHINGTON - A former Justice Department official testified before the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights that his superiors told lawyers they were not interested in pursuing Voting Rights Act accusations against two members of the New Black Panther Party in Philadelphia. The department denies the allegations. The commission is looking into the handling of accusations of attempted voter intimidation in the 2008 election. - AP
NEWS
July 2, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
MINISTER KING Samir Shabazz, the notorious black supremacist and leader of the New Black Panther Party's Philadelphia chapter, is in jail again. Trenton police arrested him after officers - serving an outstanding warrant out of Atlantic City - found a 9 mm handgun, 30 rifle rounds and one armor-piercing bullet in a room where he was staying in the city's Battle Monument neighborhood, spokesman Lt. Mark Kieffer said. It was the second gun arrest in a year for Shabazz, 42, whose real name is Maruse Heath.
NEWS
July 4, 2010
Brain Food, C2 Sally Schwartz Friedman: At Penn 50th reunion, women graduates look back at a world transformed. Pop quiz: July 4th speeches. Insights and Observations, C3 Dick Polman: Afghanistan policy and the antiwar left. Buzz Bissinger: Thinking about America from the vantage point of a first-century Philadelphia. Editorials, C4 The Senate should confirm Elena Kagan, President Obama's nominee to replace John Paul Stevens on the Supreme Court.
NEWS
March 4, 1999 | By Stephanie L. Arnold, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For many of the 50 or so students, teachers, staff and visitors jammed into Room 121 of Armitage Hall at Rutgers University-Camden yesterday, catching a glimpse of a figure in American history was enough. But for Bobby Seale, cofounder of one of the most influential '60s protest organizations, standing behind a wooden lectern to preach black history and the existence of racism would not suffice. "I'm here to set the record straight about the Black Panther Party," he said, sporting a black beret embroidered with the words "Seize the Time" - the title of one of his books - and "Reach.
NEWS
February 2, 2000 | BY HIRAM K. ASHANTEE
The Philadelphia Chapter of the New Black Panther Party for Self-Defense is mobilizing support for a campaign to change a street name - particularly Wallace Street between 6th and Broad - to honor original Black Panther Party member Mumia Abu-Jamal. Mumia grew up in the Richard Allen Homes housing project in this area. The proposed street name is Mumia Abu-Jamal Way. Ironically, "Wallace" is the last name of Gov. George Wallace, the racist politician who held a presidential rally in Philadelphia in 1968, where Mumia, involved in a protest, was beaten by Wallace supporters and Philadelphia police officers.
NEWS
August 1, 2007
WHO IS Samir Shabazz and why should anyone care what he and the New Black Panther Party think? He says the murder of Tykeem Law should be considered a hate crime. Why? Because the killer is white? He says that Charles Meyers should receive the death penalty, and I agree. But why? Because he is white? Where has Shabazz been for the other 231 murders in Philadelphia this year, and why isn't he calling for these murderers to be put to death? Could it be that a majority of them are African-Americans?
NEWS
February 14, 2001 | By Kaitlin Gurney, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Black Panther Party wasn't a racist organization of gun-toting thugs, as much of society viewed it, but an activist group working for racial change, founder Bobby Seale said at Rowan University yesterday. As the keynote speaker for the university's Black History Month celebration, Seale sought to dispel misconceptions about the Black Panthers and mobilize students to be politically active in his address, "From the '60s to the Future. " "We were portrayed as a bunch of hoodlums, and people thought that because we had guns, we opposed Martin Luther King and nonviolence.
NEWS
March 2, 1989 | By Dan Hardy, Special to The Inquirer
As a member of the Black Panther Party in the 1960s, Bobby Seale was regarded by law enforcement authorities as a threat to society. He was a member of a group that openly displayed weapons during street patrols in Oakland, Calif. He was bound and gagged in court as a member of the original "Chicago 8," and two of his associates died during a predawn police raid on a Black Panther house in Chicago. It was all part of an effort to achieve the party's demand for "land, bread, education, housing, justice, and peace.
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO & STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writers difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
KING SAMIR SHABAZZ says black people should create militias to exterminate whites, skin them alive, pour acid on them, sic pit bulls on them, bust their heads with rocks and even raid nurseries to "kill everything white in sight. " "I would love nothing more than to come home with a cracker's head in my book bag," Shabazz, a Philly street preacher and national field marshal for the New Black Panther Party, said on a black-power radio show. Such sentiment hasn't gotten him arrested.
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