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Black President

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NEWS
May 27, 2011
MARC LAMONT Hill's May 25 column ( "Black Pols Vs. Pols Who are Black" ) may be accommodating to "whites," who he suggests may be "uncomfortable" with "race" talk - but he, conveniently, never made the point that there seems to be a double standard when it comes to the African-American vote. For example, it's said that Barack Obama is "everybody's president," not just the president of African-Americans. Yet not a single other president in U.S. history has ever had that standard of representing all voters, from the slave owner George Washington to Bill Clinton, who was president when the Million Man March occurred in 1995.
NEWS
June 11, 2008 | Les Payne
Les Payne is a columnist for Newsday The emergence of Barack Obama as presumptive nominee is considered a credit to blacks; however, it is more a victory for the Democratic Party, and should he win in November, it might prove to be a triumph for the entire nation. The Illinois senator is indeed part of the continuum of blacks' struggle to gain political empowerment as U.S. citizens. He arrived on the shoulders of preceding black presidential candidates; however, he stands now on the platform of preceding Democratic nominees.
NEWS
April 4, 1988 | By Claude Lewis, Inquirer Editorial Board
On Wednesday I was on Carol Saline's WDVT Talk 900 radio program. I arrived to discuss the Kerner commission report 20 years after it was released in 1968. We began with Jesse Jackson's candidacy for the Democratic nomination for president. Mention Jackson's name and people become passionate. Callers insisted Jackson lacked the "experience" of running a government. "That's true," I said, "but is experience the measure? Look how much damage President Reagan has done with experience.
NEWS
January 22, 2009 | By George Curry
I was at Denver's Invesco Field at Mile High stadium when Barack Obama gave his speech accepting his party's presidential nomination. Later, I eagerly watched the general election returns in the news offices of the Baltimore Afro, where I was serving as an editorial consultant. And I was on the Mall on Tuesday to witness Obama being sworn in as the nation's 44th president. Still, the reality of an African American becoming president of the United States did not sink in until I saw a Jumbotron image of Obama inside the Capitol just minutes before he would come outside to take the oath of office.
NEWS
January 26, 2009
RE BYKO'S Jan. 22 column on Obama: It's not about black or white history, it's about qualifications. I have no problem with a black president, but not one who was put in there because he's black. Community organizers are important, but that does not qualify you for president. One Senate term and no work-related experience scares me. He'll be challenged. Even Joe Biden expects it. And the only experience he'll have to fall back on is "gathering" people in Chicago to unite in whatever cause he was promoting.
NEWS
February 7, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Foreign Minister Roelof F. "Pik" Botha, defending the South African government's proposed political reforms, said yesterday that his country could be governed by a black president provided there is an agreement protecting the rights of the white minority. Botha, going further than any cabinet minister has dared to go before, said he saw a black-led government as the "inevitable result in the future" if President Pieter W. Botha's new proposals on power-sharing are accepted by South Africa's black majority and become the basis for a new constitutional system.
NEWS
November 14, 2003
EVER NOTICE that every TV show and commercial that depicts an office has an equal number of men and women, a black, an Asian, a Hispanic, an elderly? That virtually every judge on TV is a black woman, every chief of police a "tough but fair" black man? The real percentages are under 5 percent for both professions. That the white man in the group is usually the butt of jokes, never the minorities? Notice that all beer commercials show the politically correct mix socializing together?
NEWS
November 9, 2008 | By Earl Ofari Hutchinson
The instant Barack Obama tossed his hat in the presidential ring, the dominant mantra was that he could be the first black president. That mantra was dead wrong. The early hint that race was overblown came from Obama. He didn't talk about it. For good reason. He was running for president, not black president. He made that crucial distinction for personal and political purposes. The ritual preface of the word black in front of every achievement or breakthrough by an African American is insulting, condescending and minimizes their achievement.
SPORTS
January 22, 2009 | By Kate Fagan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It sounds as if Saturday will be the day. For a week, the return of 76ers power forward Elton Brand supposedly has been just around the next bend in the NBA schedule. But one game came and went, then the next, then the next. Finally, a little less than six weeks after Brand suffered a dislocated right shoulder, he is expected to return Saturday against the New York Knicks at the Wachovia Center. Coach Tony DiLeo said the plan is to have Brand come off the bench that night and play in "short stints" of four, five or six minutes.
NEWS
October 28, 2015
WORDS HAVE POWER to make you believe, but also to deceive. In 1984 , his brilliant "Big Brother" novel (that in some ways has achieved reality), George Orwell invented Newspeak, a language in which words don't mean what they say. In real life, Orwell fought against opaque, meaningless words he thought discouraged clear thought. If you are pushing your point of view, you want it to sound smart and nice. You want the other guy's position to seem dumb and nasty. That's why abortion activists on both sides frame their positions as being positive: " pro -choice" or " pro -life.
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NEWS
January 19, 2016 | Inquirer Editorial Board
This Martin Luther King Jr. Day has added significance. By the time the national holiday arrives next year, Barack Obama will have only four days left in his tenure as America's first African American president. There is no telling when there will be a second. Ben Carson is fading as a contender for the Republican nomination, and even if he got it, his right-wing positions would cost him many votes among African Americans, who tend to be socially conservative but vote liberal. Among Democrats, up-and-comers like New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker hold the most potential.
NEWS
October 28, 2015
WORDS HAVE POWER to make you believe, but also to deceive. In 1984 , his brilliant "Big Brother" novel (that in some ways has achieved reality), George Orwell invented Newspeak, a language in which words don't mean what they say. In real life, Orwell fought against opaque, meaningless words he thought discouraged clear thought. If you are pushing your point of view, you want it to sound smart and nice. You want the other guy's position to seem dumb and nasty. That's why abortion activists on both sides frame their positions as being positive: " pro -choice" or " pro -life.
NEWS
March 12, 2013
Cheltenham is worth every penny As a child raised in East Oak Lane by two Philadelphia schoolteachers, I wanted strong public schools for my children, so my husband and I chose Cheltenham. Twenty years and three children later, my community continues to delight me through its activism and honest dialogue, but most of all because of the people who choose to live here - artists, writers, teachers, professors, scientists - people who are changing the world for the better ("It's 'wonderful,' but taxing," March 3)
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
Now that Barack Hussein Obama has placed his hand on the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s Bible and taken the oath of office for his second term as 44th president of the United States, the clock begins to tick on history. Sure, you could argue that Obama made history when he was sworn in as the nation's first African American president four years ago - and he did. Hope and change. First black president. Post-racial society. Talk about giddy with optimism. Obama stood as the embodiment of everything for which King and the civil-rights movement had cleared the way. Obama's very presence soothed the worn feet of Rosa Parks; justified the Bloody Sunday scar still visible on John Lewis' head; avenged the murders of four little girls in a Birmingham church.
NEWS
November 12, 2012
By David M. Kennedy Barack Obama made history in 2008. It may now be his fate merely to mark time. Obama's election as the first black president closed a chapter - though surely not the book - in America's long, vexed racial history, just as John F. Kennedy's election amounted to a major cadence in the nation's turbulent religious history. Kennedy proved to be both the first and last Catholic president, in the sense that Catholicism has never since defined political identity as it did for most of the republic's first two centuries.
NEWS
November 8, 2012 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
Barack Obama has always said it was never about him. It was about us. And in the end, it was. Forget all of the polarization and backbiting. The voter suppression and racist dog whistles. The obsession with polls and the divisive parsing of our nation. On Tuesday, it was our turn. And we used our single most powerful weapon. The vote. Four years ago, I could hardly type the words to express my euphoria when the nation resoundingly placed its future in the hands of its first African American president.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Travis Loller, Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS - The Southern Baptist Convention voted Tuesday to elect its first African American president in one of its biggest steps yet to reconcile the 167-year-old denomination's troubled racial past and appeal to a more diverse group of believers. The Rev. Fred Luter Jr. was unopposed in being elected by thousands of enthusiastic delegates Tuesday at the annual meeting of the nation's largest Protestant denomination in his hometown of New Orleans. Pastor David Crosby of First Baptist New Orleans nominated Luter, calling him a "fire-breathing, miracle-working pastor" who "would likely be a candidate for sainthood if he were Catholic.
SPORTS
April 24, 2012
LeRoy Walker, 93, the first African American president of the U.S. Olympic Committee who attended the Penn Relays for six decades as a coach and referee, died Monday in Durham, N.C. Dr. Walker spent more than 40 years at North Carolina Central, first as track coach and later as chancellor. During his career, he coached eight Olympians who won a total of 11 medals, including back-to-back golds by hurdler Lee Calhoun in 1956 and 1960. Dr. Walker became the first African American coach of the U.S. Olympic men's track and field team in 1976 and led the squad to 22 medals, including six gold.
NEWS
May 27, 2011
MARC LAMONT Hill's May 25 column ( "Black Pols Vs. Pols Who are Black" ) may be accommodating to "whites," who he suggests may be "uncomfortable" with "race" talk - but he, conveniently, never made the point that there seems to be a double standard when it comes to the African-American vote. For example, it's said that Barack Obama is "everybody's president," not just the president of African-Americans. Yet not a single other president in U.S. history has ever had that standard of representing all voters, from the slave owner George Washington to Bill Clinton, who was president when the Million Man March occurred in 1995.
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