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Black Robe

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1992 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
A journey of wonder and terror and a thoughtful evening on the town top this week's list of new videos. BLACK ROBE (1991) (Vidmark) $94.95. 101 minutes. Lothaire Bluteau, Aden Young, August Schellenberg. Director Bruce Beresford's gorgeously mounted and provocatively intelligent historical epic about a Jesuit's harrowing evangelical mission among Indians in the Quebec wilderness of 1634 goes beyond the traditional pieties of native dignity and white man's exploitation. The film doesn't hinge on the clash of two worlds so much as on irreconcilable views of the next one. A very special achievement.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1993 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Black Robe, Bruce Beresford fashioned a memorable and mesmerizing variation on the ever-rich theme of the explorer whose walk into the wilderness becomes a journey of self-discovery. The gorgeously mounted movie (it has to be seen on the big screen) recounts a 1,500-mile trek through the remote reaches of northern Quebec in the seventeenth century. The traveler is Father LaForgue, a Jesuit missionary, and more than two worlds collide in his encounter with the Indians he hopes to convert to Christianity.
NEWS
October 11, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He rode into office on a motorcycle, with a suspended license and thousands in unpaid tickets, promising voters a sympathetic ear when they came before him in Philadelphia Traffic Court. He left his black robe and $85,000 salary behind in February after just four years when a Traffic Court cashier accused him of showing her cellphone photos of, well, the lower court. Traffic Court Judge Willie F. Singletary is gone but not forgotten, as Pennsylvania's Court of Judicial Discipline made clear Tuesday in an opinion excoriating Singletary for "bringing his judicial office into public disrepute.
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
If "Black Robe" is an example of revised, multi-cultural history, we're in trouble. The Algonquin tribesmen in "Black Robe," set in 1634, make great sport of the Jesuit priests who arrive in Quebec circa 1600 to spread Christianity. The Indians stand around trading quips about the Jesuit notion of paradise - no fornication, no hunting - no fun at all! The Western civ rebuttal is hardly worthy of St. Thomas Aquinas. Heaven, as one white man says (in all seriousness), is just "people sitting on clouds looking at God. " This the new fashion in frontier movies.
NEWS
April 12, 2005
GAR JOSEPH'S "Wanna be a judge? Get your wallet out" column (March 25) opened with "If you want to wear the black robe of justice, think orange. Day-Glo orange. The kind supplied by the Bureau of Prisons. " But the article really paints the picture of picking Philly judges as "green" : Green as in money, lots of it. Wouldn't it be better to have a system of choosing judges symbolized by a big "Q" for qualifications - or "gold" for gold seal of approved confidence? Fortunately, we do get many qualified judges, but that's in large part due to luck.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1991 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In his highly regarded essays on cultural and racial collisions, from Breaker Morant to Driving Miss Daisy, Bruce Beresford has always believed in getting things right, down to the smallest detail. Which is how he found out that little things can almost kill you. Before filming Black Robe, an epically scaled story of a driven Jesuit missionary in the Canadian wilderness during the 17th century, Beresford and his location manager set off on a scouting trip in remote northern Quebec.
NEWS
February 22, 1986 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The public tends to fear and mistrust judges because it thinks they are often aloof, do not work hard and get their jobs through political favoritism, a meeting of Pennsylvania trial judges was told in Philadelphia yesterday. "We should no longer hide behind that black robe," New York City Civil Court Judge Nat H. Hentel told a meeting of the Pennsylvania Conference of State Trial Judges. Some 225 people, mostly Common Pleas Court judges from across the state, were attending the four-day meeting, which winds up today at the Four Seasons Hotel.
NEWS
August 22, 2007
Facing federal insurance-fraud charges, Superior Court Judge Michael T. Joyce has performed what may be his last public service to Pennsylvania voters and the state's judiciary. He reached the right verdict on his own judicial career. The judge's decision Monday to hang up his black robe rather than seek retention in November to another 10-year term spares voters an awkward decision, while also making a bow to political reality. Joyce's withdrawal follows swift, decisive action last week by the state Supreme Court, which suspended him from hearing cases until his own legal battles are concluded.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Francine I. Axelrad, Cherry Hill's solicitor since 1988, was sworn in yesterday as a tax court judge in New Jersey but was promptly assigned to Gloucester County's besieged Family Court. In an hour-long ceremony featuring more wisecracks than stuffy legalese, Axelrad of Camden County was welcomed to Gloucester County - and warned about what she was getting into. The Family Court has been described as a security nightmare by Sheriff James Hogan and the two judges that have presided there for more than seven years.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
He rode into office on a motorcycle, with a suspended license and thousands in unpaid tickets, promising voters a sympathetic ear when they came before him in Philadelphia Traffic Court. He left his black robe and $85,000 salary behind in February after just four years when a Traffic Court cashier accused him of showing her cellphone photos of, well, the lower court. Traffic Court Judge Willie F. Singletary is gone but not forgotten, as Pennsylvania's Court of Judicial Discipline made clear Tuesday in an opinion excoriating Singletary for "bringing his judicial office into public disrepute.
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NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
He rode into office on a motorcycle, with a suspended license and thousands in unpaid tickets, promising voters a sympathetic ear when they came before him in Philadelphia Traffic Court. He left his black robe and $85,000 salary behind in February after just four years when a Traffic Court cashier accused him of showing her cellphone photos of, well, the lower court. Traffic Court Judge Willie F. Singletary is gone but not forgotten, as Pennsylvania's Court of Judicial Discipline made clear Tuesday in an opinion excoriating Singletary for "bringing his judicial office into public disrepute.
NEWS
October 11, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He rode into office on a motorcycle, with a suspended license and thousands in unpaid tickets, promising voters a sympathetic ear when they came before him in Philadelphia Traffic Court. He left his black robe and $85,000 salary behind in February after just four years when a Traffic Court cashier accused him of showing her cellphone photos of, well, the lower court. Traffic Court Judge Willie F. Singletary is gone but not forgotten, as Pennsylvania's Court of Judicial Discipline made clear Tuesday in an opinion excoriating Singletary for "bringing his judicial office into public disrepute.
NEWS
August 22, 2007
Facing federal insurance-fraud charges, Superior Court Judge Michael T. Joyce has performed what may be his last public service to Pennsylvania voters and the state's judiciary. He reached the right verdict on his own judicial career. The judge's decision Monday to hang up his black robe rather than seek retention in November to another 10-year term spares voters an awkward decision, while also making a bow to political reality. Joyce's withdrawal follows swift, decisive action last week by the state Supreme Court, which suspended him from hearing cases until his own legal battles are concluded.
NEWS
April 12, 2005
GAR JOSEPH'S "Wanna be a judge? Get your wallet out" column (March 25) opened with "If you want to wear the black robe of justice, think orange. Day-Glo orange. The kind supplied by the Bureau of Prisons. " But the article really paints the picture of picking Philly judges as "green" : Green as in money, lots of it. Wouldn't it be better to have a system of choosing judges symbolized by a big "Q" for qualifications - or "gold" for gold seal of approved confidence? Fortunately, we do get many qualified judges, but that's in large part due to luck.
NEWS
December 24, 1997 | By Chris Satullo
The story so far: In the bedroom of his mansion after midnight Dec. 24, software mogul Quentin Stiles has seen three holographic visitors emerge from his bedside computer: his old partner Simon Charles, and the Viruses of Christmas Past and Present. The Virus of Christmas Present has just shown him how his angry cancellation of vacation for a top manager has torn apart the employee's family. HUENTIN STILES' eyes were clenched shut, trying to erase the sight of two parents gazing in anguish as their son rocked to and fro before a computer screen, locked in autistic embrace of a binary world that didn't include them.
NEWS
February 4, 1996
"It's irrelevant what you've done as a lawyer. Qualifications, experience, reputation . . . they're irrelevant. " That blunt assessment of what it doesn't take to run for judge in Philadelphia, from a highly regarded lawyer, should be enough of a wake-up call on the flaws of judicial elections. It was only one of many harsh assessments unearthed, though, by Inquirer staff writer L. Stuart Ditzen when he recently dissected the 1995 contests for Common Pleas Court. His article showed that what really matters in such races in Pennsylvania is the interplay of political horse-trading, favoritism and, most of all, buckets of money.
NEWS
July 13, 1995 | BY LINDA WRIGHT MOORE
Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas has come a long way since his riveting, indignant accusation that his confirmation hearings were a "high- tech lynching. " For Thomas, race was the ideal trump card. It turned Anita Hill into a hysterical liar hypnotized by feminazis, and co-opted millions of black folks, who rushed to defend a "brother" under fire. Once draped in his black robe, Thomas's true colors became clear. A "brother" he is not. Without exception, he has voted with the court's conservative wing.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Francine I. Axelrad, Cherry Hill's solicitor since 1988, was sworn in yesterday as a tax court judge in New Jersey but was promptly assigned to Gloucester County's besieged Family Court. In an hour-long ceremony featuring more wisecracks than stuffy legalese, Axelrad of Camden County was welcomed to Gloucester County - and warned about what she was getting into. The Family Court has been described as a security nightmare by Sheriff James Hogan and the two judges that have presided there for more than seven years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1993 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Black Robe, Bruce Beresford fashioned a memorable and mesmerizing variation on the ever-rich theme of the explorer whose walk into the wilderness becomes a journey of self-discovery. The gorgeously mounted movie (it has to be seen on the big screen) recounts a 1,500-mile trek through the remote reaches of northern Quebec in the seventeenth century. The traveler is Father LaForgue, a Jesuit missionary, and more than two worlds collide in his encounter with the Indians he hopes to convert to Christianity.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1992 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
A journey of wonder and terror and a thoughtful evening on the town top this week's list of new videos. BLACK ROBE (1991) (Vidmark) $94.95. 101 minutes. Lothaire Bluteau, Aden Young, August Schellenberg. Director Bruce Beresford's gorgeously mounted and provocatively intelligent historical epic about a Jesuit's harrowing evangelical mission among Indians in the Quebec wilderness of 1634 goes beyond the traditional pieties of native dignity and white man's exploitation. The film doesn't hinge on the clash of two worlds so much as on irreconcilable views of the next one. A very special achievement.
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