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Black Sabbath

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1999 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
My dad always told me to use the right tool for the job. The original lineup of Black Sabbath - reuniting for a little graybeard glory (and a lot of cash) for the first time in nearly 20 years - was coming to town and I got the concertreview assignment. Having never been much of a headbanger, I enlisted the help of a Black Sabbath expert. He calls himself Jimmy Satan. He's 23, plays guitar for a band of local heavy-metal humorists called Wastoid, and lives with his parents in deep Southwest Philly.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2005 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
SABBATH can finally rest easy. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame spoke yesterday and what it said was: "Ozzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzy!" Yes, foul-mouthed, drug-addled, bat-biting frontman, Ozzy Osbourne, who had previously called the Hall's vote "totally irrelevant," will lead Black Sabbath into the Class of 2006 along with Miles Davis, Lynyrd Skynyrd, the Sex Pistols and Blondie. Miles Davis? Black Sabbath was first nominated to the Hall in 1996, but had missed the cut every year.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The legend of the first edition of Black Sabbath - heavy metal's loudest, sludgiest, darkest band - looms large; large enough to survive Ozzy Osbourne's leaving after Never Say Die! in 1978; large enough, even, to survive the demonic singer's family-friendly time as a reality television staple. Since the band's 1969 start, guitarist Tony Iommi's arsenal of thick, monster riffs and archly sinister solos, along with bassist Geezer Butler's nimble-fingered low-end rumble (to say nothing of his meanly fantastical lyrics)
NEWS
August 7, 1992 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Justice is mine, sayeth the God of heavy metal rock, looking down on his most worthy of subjects, Black Sabbath, and summoning them to rise anew. For decades, the British-born Sabbath was thrown out of the temple, rejected by the scribes of music criticism and the programmers of radio who listened but could not hear Sabbath's anguished cries of rebellion, nor understand their mystical, spiritual search. The naysayers judged them only as noisy despoilers of the music known then as progressive rock.
NEWS
May 18, 2010
Ronnie James Dio, 67, a singer with the heavy-metal bands Rainbow, Black Sabbath, and Dio, whose powerful vocal style and attachment to demonic imagery made him a genre mainstay, died Sunday of stomach cancer in Los Angeles. Mr. Dio was known as much for his vocal prowess as for his stage persona. He sang about devils, defiance, and the glory of rock-and-roll with a voice that rose to a bombastic vibrato. He is credited with popularizing the "devil horn" hand gesture - index and pinkie fingers up, everything else clenched in a fist - as a symbol of metal's occultlike worship of everything scary and heavy.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1995 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
Spinal Tap 3? Confused hordes of KISS conventioneers? No, it's the meeting of old metal minds - Black Sabbath and Motorhead - that brought the fist- and finger-waving throng to the TLA Tuesday. The downsized show (originally scheduled at the Tower) carried with it the requisite tattoo and biker attitude; but that ideology has been adopted by both alternative and skate-punk crowds. What's a metal dude to do? Bring on the merry old men of mirthful metal: Motorhead. The high-decibel trio is led by greasy, mutton-chopped Lemmy, whose fuzz- bass leads and whiskey-soaked rusty scream define this manically grotesque pub rock.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1994 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
Soundgarden is single-handedly revolutionizing heavy metal. In the beginning, when Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and Deep Purple first reworked the blues, the music's appeal was universal. But since the early '70s, the genre has spoken mostly to suburban teenage boys. At the Tower Theater on Thursday, Soundgarden reclaimed heavy metal for the masses. The work of heavy metal's pioneers remains the bedrock of the Seattle quartet's tunes. Approximately half of Thursday's show was devoted to that older, simpler material.
NEWS
August 8, 2008 | By David R. Stampone FOR THE INQUIRER
Running through August, the highly anticipated Metal Masters Tour started Wednesday night at Camden's Susquehanna Bank Center with a dazzling doubleheader of winning theatrical metal from two rock bands with roots going back 40 years to Birmingham, England. Judas Priest headlined, opening with selections from its new double-CD "metal opera" Nostradamus about the 16th-century French poet-prophet; the band closed 85 minutes later after leather-loving frontman Rob Halford rolled out on a motorcycle for a three-song encore climaxed by "You've Got Another Thing Coming.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2006 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
PLEASE, O great gods of Tattle, we beseech thee! Can we please be done with Anna Nicole Smith? Thunderclap. Lightning. "Nope. " Bahamian authorities are investigating whether Anna Nicole legally obtained permanent residency in the Bahamas. (Maybe if they built a fence around the island, they could keep people like Anna Nicole out.) The probe centers on the $1 million mansion that Smith's application for residency claimed she had purchased from rich guy Gaither B. Thompson, who allegedly enjoyed pole dances by the ex-stripper last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2012
HOW MUCH of a music freak was Stu Green? As a teenager in the 1960s, he'd "stay up all night listening to the Doug Henderson Rocketship Show on the radio," younger brother Rick Green recalled Monday. "And he told me he literally walked from his house in Teaneck, N.J., to the Apollo Theater in Harlem [crossing the George Washington Bridge] so he could take in big R&B shows," said Stu Green's daughter, Georgia. "James Brown, Otis Redding and Jackie Wilson were his special favorites," she added.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The legend of the first edition of Black Sabbath - heavy metal's loudest, sludgiest, darkest band - looms large; large enough to survive Ozzy Osbourne's leaving after Never Say Die! in 1978; large enough, even, to survive the demonic singer's family-friendly time as a reality television staple. Since the band's 1969 start, guitarist Tony Iommi's arsenal of thick, monster riffs and archly sinister solos, along with bassist Geezer Butler's nimble-fingered low-end rumble (to say nothing of his meanly fantastical lyrics)
NEWS
June 16, 2013
New Recordings **** Excellent, *** Good, ** Fair, * Poor   Bill Frisell Big Sur (Okeh ***) Guitarist Bill Frisell has created a sound all his own, fluid and languid at its core but capable of dissonant distortions and pointillistic precision, and he has flexible and eclectic tastes. In the last few years alone, he's released albums of John Lennon covers and abstract solo guitar improvisations; worked with folksinger Abigail Washburn, Brazilian singer Vinicius Cantuaria, and avant-garde composer John Zorn; and revived his electronic experimental project Floratone.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2012
HOW MUCH of a music freak was Stu Green? As a teenager in the 1960s, he'd "stay up all night listening to the Doug Henderson Rocketship Show on the radio," younger brother Rick Green recalled Monday. "And he told me he literally walked from his house in Teaneck, N.J., to the Apollo Theater in Harlem [crossing the George Washington Bridge] so he could take in big R&B shows," said Stu Green's daughter, Georgia. "James Brown, Otis Redding and Jackie Wilson were his special favorites," she added.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2010
Interviewing Ozzy Osbourne - dark metal god, Black Sabbath singer, Sharon's husband - is a game of volley and serve. When a reporter asks a question, Ozzy lobs it back in charmingly diffident fashion. "There's a lot of downsides to life everywhere, isn't there?" Osbourne responds when asked about his recently published autobiography, I Am Ozzy (Grand Central Publishing, $26.99), and how unflinchingly he looks at his hazardous past of bat biting, drug overdosing, and reality television filming.
NEWS
May 18, 2010
Ronnie James Dio, 67, a singer with the heavy-metal bands Rainbow, Black Sabbath, and Dio, whose powerful vocal style and attachment to demonic imagery made him a genre mainstay, died Sunday of stomach cancer in Los Angeles. Mr. Dio was known as much for his vocal prowess as for his stage persona. He sang about devils, defiance, and the glory of rock-and-roll with a voice that rose to a bombastic vibrato. He is credited with popularizing the "devil horn" hand gesture - index and pinkie fingers up, everything else clenched in a fist - as a symbol of metal's occultlike worship of everything scary and heavy.
NEWS
August 8, 2008 | By David R. Stampone FOR THE INQUIRER
Running through August, the highly anticipated Metal Masters Tour started Wednesday night at Camden's Susquehanna Bank Center with a dazzling doubleheader of winning theatrical metal from two rock bands with roots going back 40 years to Birmingham, England. Judas Priest headlined, opening with selections from its new double-CD "metal opera" Nostradamus about the 16th-century French poet-prophet; the band closed 85 minutes later after leather-loving frontman Rob Halford rolled out on a motorcycle for a three-song encore climaxed by "You've Got Another Thing Coming.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2007 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Once upon a time - in the heavy-metal '80s - a little man with an operatic howl and extravagant lyrics took the reigns of the land's darkest band from its evilest ogre. Before this gets too silly, it was Ronnie James Dio who fronted Black Sabbath after Ozzy Osbourne split. While Tony Iommi's hammering riffs and "Geezer" Butler's lumbering thuds stayed gloriously glum, Dio lent the diabolical Sabbath Dungeons & Dragons-like esprit. Reunited now as Heaven and Hell, with ham-handed drummer Vinny Appice, they stood before a castle's rocks (seriously, that's their staging)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2006 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
PLEASE, O great gods of Tattle, we beseech thee! Can we please be done with Anna Nicole Smith? Thunderclap. Lightning. "Nope. " Bahamian authorities are investigating whether Anna Nicole legally obtained permanent residency in the Bahamas. (Maybe if they built a fence around the island, they could keep people like Anna Nicole out.) The probe centers on the $1 million mansion that Smith's application for residency claimed she had purchased from rich guy Gaither B. Thompson, who allegedly enjoyed pole dances by the ex-stripper last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2005 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
SABBATH can finally rest easy. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame spoke yesterday and what it said was: "Ozzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzy!" Yes, foul-mouthed, drug-addled, bat-biting frontman, Ozzy Osbourne, who had previously called the Hall's vote "totally irrelevant," will lead Black Sabbath into the Class of 2006 along with Miles Davis, Lynyrd Skynyrd, the Sex Pistols and Blondie. Miles Davis? Black Sabbath was first nominated to the Hall in 1996, but had missed the cut every year.
NEWS
August 28, 2004 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
What the sold-out crowd at the Tweeter Center needed more than anything around 9:30 Thursday night was a voice of reason. Thank the metal gods for Judas Priest front man Rob Halford. Black Sabbath drummer Bill Ward had just delivered the buzz-kill news to the 25,000 members of Ozzfest Nation, some of whom had been at the annual metal-thon all day - enduring such atrocities as Lacuna Coil's bad Evanescence impersonation and the comically ghoulish goth-thrash of Dimmu Borgir: Ozzy Osbourne had bronchitis and would not be fronting Sabbath this evening.
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