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Black Sheep

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2007 | By BOB STRAUSS Los Angeles Daily News
Zombie sheep. Kind of a natural symbolic link there, don't you think? But as the recent "Fido" proved, a clever connection between this particular horror genre and a metaphorical target doesn't necessarily make for either funny satire or good scares. "Black Sheep," however, pulls off both tricks marvelously. As you may know, New Zealand is home to some 40 million head of mutton, so the humor here comes from deep down in the cultural DNA of Kiwi writer-director Jonathan King.
NEWS
October 1, 1992 | by Chuck Arnold, Daily News Staff Writer
When Black Sheep emerged from the rap pack as the new jacks of the Native Tongues tribe (De La Soul, the Jungle Brothers, A Tribe Called Quest, Queen Latifah), they tasted like the flavor of the month. Their initial success seemed to have more to do with their GQ look and hip-hop connections than their rhyming technique. But, a year later, the dope duo of Dres, 22, and Mista Lawnge (pronounced Long), 20, have still got it goin' on. With slammin' singles like "Flavor of the Month," "The Choice Is Yours" and "Strobelite Honey" from their hit debut album, "A Wolf in Sheep's Clothing" (Mercury)
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | By Tim Panaccio, Inquirer Staff Writer
You might say Hank Julicher is a genuine Sunkist worshiper. To him, life is just an orange. "You squeeze and squeeze until nothing is left," he said. "I got plenty of juice left. " Julicher does nothing halfway. As the founder of Julicher Athletic Facilities Inc. in Conshohocken, he turned a fondness for tennis into a multimillion-dollar, international business. Julicher is flamboyant, outspoken and not the least bit modest. And he's a six-time college dropout. "My major was matriculation," he said.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | by Sono Motoyama, Daily News Staff Writer
Where better to be on a history-making night in American elections than in a jovial Irish bar? By last Wednesday, I had long lost interest in American history anyway and was more concerned with getting fed and watered at a nearby saloon. My Ukrainian friend Andrei (who's not even a citizen, fergoshsake) and I went to check out Black Sheep, which opened this fall in the Rittenhouse Square area. Formerly the gay leather bar 247, the upscale Irish pub is owned by two Irish lads, Matthew Kennedy and James Stephens, along with real estate developer Gene LeFevre.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1996 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Laurel and Hardy, Abbott and Costello, Lewis and Martin, Farley and Spade. Farley and Spade? Clearly somebody thinks Chris Farley, who is big and slobby and excels at hurling himself into stationary objects, and David Spade, who is thin and wan and forever at the ready with a snippy aside, have the makings of comic duodom in the grand tradition of comic duodom. First paired on Saturday Night Live and then on last year's big-screen knuckleheader Tommy Boy, Farley and Spade are back at it in Black Sheep, a lowbrow, slapstick farce directed by Penelope Spheeris.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2006 | By Lloylita Prout INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The King, amen, is among us. Not the King as in Jesus, but the ThinkFilm movie released Tuesday on DVD. Written by Milo Addica, who wrote Monster's Ball and Birth, this "psychological thriller" is about a black sheep character named Elvis Valderez. After being discharged from the Navy, Elvis, played by Gael Garc?a Bernal of The Motorcycle Diaries, arrives in Corpus Christi, Texas, in search of his father, David Sandow, a Baptist preacher. The reunion is anything but pleasant: Sandow (played by William Hurt)
NEWS
March 19, 2001 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They're called "black sheep" - those children who forever misbehave, and challenge their parents and teachers and drive them crazy. "Everyone I've ever talked to has one, knows one or was one," said author and social activist Johann Christoph Arnold, who was in Philadelphia to address a weekend conference of child-care providers and educators. Instead of viewing such black sheep as a thorn of parenthood, Arnold suggested that difficult children be seen as providing the opportunity to fully realize the sacrifice, joy and rewards that come with being a mother or father.
LIVING
December 3, 2000 | By Alex Richmond, FOR THE INQUIRER
It took 11 months for Black Sheep owners Matt Kennedy and James Stephens to convert the space at 247 S. 17th St. into a replica of a 1850s pub, but they did it - amber sconces, Brazilian black cherry wood floors, textured, leatherlike wallpaper and all. The result is an Irish bar from heaven, where young people in wool sweaters and Doc Martens mingle easily with Main Liners. With brogues as thick and sweet as the head on a Guinness, Belfast-born Kennedy and Stephens of Cavern describe the work they put into transforming the place.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1992 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
African Americans celebrate a decade of festivals at Penn's Landing next weekend with two days of hand-clapping and foot-stomping music, lots of food and crafts and just plain, old-fashioned fun. The musical lineup includes jazz saxophonist/percussionist and poet Byard Lancaster, Black Sheep (seen recently on the Arsenio Hall show), Gabra Selassi, the Gospel Blenders, the King Davis Choir, the Jenkins Sisters, the South Philly Gold Stompers and others. Food and crafts will be sold by some 150 vendors.
NEWS
September 20, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Sitting at the knee of the high priestess of daytime television, George W. Bush was faced yesterday with a true Oprah Winfrey moment. Tell us, she said, speaking on behalf of her 7 million, mostly women viewers, about a time when you needed forgiveness. "When my heart turns dark, when I am jealous, or when I am spiteful," the Republican presidential contender said, terse and cool. Impatient but also devilish, Winfrey bore in, "I'm looking for specifics. " "I know you are," Bush rejoined, shaking off his reserve with a grin, "but I'm running for president.
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NEWS
December 11, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
EVERY FAMILY HAS its difficult members - black sheep, if you will. But it didn't matter to Uncle El. He loved them anyway. "If you were the black sheep or if you were in the doghouse, Uncle El embraced you anyway," said the family of Elwood Rucker, a son of old Virginia who never got the South out of his bones. "He was a loving, kind, generous spirit. He was not judgmental. He accepted you the way you were. " Elwood Rucker, a 12-year employee of the Philadelphia International Airport motels and a city Streets Department worker for 33 years, died Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Tiny, sturdy Sylvia Kauders' Mama has the stoic face of thousands of Jewish grandmothers before her. When she announces, deadpan in a fluffy bathrobe, to her son Ronnie, "Did you hear who's coming? The Momzer," the audience for Marty's Back in Town , a new play by attorney/author Norman Shabel at the Skybox at the Adrienne, laughs. A momzer is a jerk, a thorn in your side, and the audience knows: These are our mishpucha , our kind of people, and this is a comic family drama that will be sprinkled with liberal doses of Yiddish, in which crazy relatives will argue, eat, and reconcile, Neil Simon-style.
NEWS
December 26, 2011 | By Carolyn Hax
While I'm away, readers give the advice. On responding to ignorant comments in shared company: I find "In my experience . . . [contrary example]" or "The information I have from [other source] . . .," said calmly and not accusingly, often works. Cross-politics friendships are really important for our society, because you may be the only person someone likes and respects who presents a different view. We're very balkanized right now, talking only with those who agree with us and getting our news from agreeable sources.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
When the economy came crashing down in 2009, it brought Kim and Edgar Alvarez's crab cakes with them - at least for a moment. Those cakes were among the signature items at the couple's former prepared foods store, the Delaware Market House in Gladwyne. But once the recession prompted enough Main Liners to start cooking more for themselves, the Alvarez' business, which thrived on small pleasures like fresh chicken salad and sirloin broil, suddenly went "completely off the deep end," says Kim. It was a sorry moment for Gladwyne take-out addicts, perhaps, but has turned into a boon for Mount Airy, where the resilient Alvarezes have resurfaced with Avenida, a Latin-inspired neighborhood restaurant well-cast for a neighborhood that can use all the good flavors it can muster.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
A tidy, brown-paper-covered booklet sold in the office of the intimate Morris House Hotel, a "boutique hotel" ("We say boutique so we can charge more," says co-owner Gene Lefevre), offers an eloquent summary of its venerable, if mildly defiant, history. When it was built in 1787, you learn, it was beyond a meadow at the edge of the potter's field that would later become Washington Square, putting it at unfashionable remove from the grander homes going up on Second Street. Though its sturdy brickwork - which remains admirable today - alternated red stretcher and black header bricks, the architecture was resolutely out of step, as well, with the tenor of the times: In this postwar moment when Frenchification was in vogue, the Morris House reached backward, employing retro-Colonial styling, so plain and staid, so frumpishly, well, yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2007 | By BOB STRAUSS Los Angeles Daily News
Zombie sheep. Kind of a natural symbolic link there, don't you think? But as the recent "Fido" proved, a clever connection between this particular horror genre and a metaphorical target doesn't necessarily make for either funny satire or good scares. "Black Sheep," however, pulls off both tricks marvelously. As you may know, New Zealand is home to some 40 million head of mutton, so the humor here comes from deep down in the cultural DNA of Kiwi writer-director Jonathan King.
NEWS
November 10, 2006 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He has the beard, the flowing robes, the sandals, and the bloody crown of thorns. But there is something different about the wanted man who slips stealthily into Jerusalem for Passover in the independent film Color of the Cross, which opens here today. He is not the tall, light-skinned, blue-eyed, sandy-haired Jesus so favored by Western artists and sculptors of the last thousand years. Instead, the film portrays him as a man of average height, slightly cross-eyed, with short, wiry hair.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2006 | By Lloylita Prout INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The King, amen, is among us. Not the King as in Jesus, but the ThinkFilm movie released Tuesday on DVD. Written by Milo Addica, who wrote Monster's Ball and Birth, this "psychological thriller" is about a black sheep character named Elvis Valderez. After being discharged from the Navy, Elvis, played by Gael Garc?a Bernal of The Motorcycle Diaries, arrives in Corpus Christi, Texas, in search of his father, David Sandow, a Baptist preacher. The reunion is anything but pleasant: Sandow (played by William Hurt)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2005 | By Nicole D'Andrea FOR THE INQUIRER
The holidays are over, the decorations have been taken down, and it's a brand-new year. You are no doubt ready for a little rest and relaxation. While it hasn't been a freezing winter so far, that doesn't mean you shouldn't be looking for a place to get in out of the cold. The frigid temps are just around the corner, so now is a great time to scout out a new watering hole. These pubs could be homey extensions of your living room - the bartenders are expecting their regulars, the fireplaces are burning bright, and the kitchens are brimming with comfort foods.
NEWS
March 19, 2001 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They're called "black sheep" - those children who forever misbehave, and challenge their parents and teachers and drive them crazy. "Everyone I've ever talked to has one, knows one or was one," said author and social activist Johann Christoph Arnold, who was in Philadelphia to address a weekend conference of child-care providers and educators. Instead of viewing such black sheep as a thorn of parenthood, Arnold suggested that difficult children be seen as providing the opportunity to fully realize the sacrifice, joy and rewards that come with being a mother or father.
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