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Black Skin

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NEWS
August 10, 1991 | By ROGER E. HERNANDEZ
A crime is committed by a gang that apparently believes in ethnic diversity. Police issue descriptions of the suspects: a white, a black, and a Hispanic. A what? In most cases, a victim who gets a halfway decent look at the assailant can tell whether he (or she) was white or black. But what does a Hispanic look like? There is no universal Hispanic "look. " This is something not well understood in this country, where both Hispanics and non-Hispanics make easy assumptions about the way Hispanics are supposed to appear.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara Walden is fond of saying that she started a revolution. About 20 years ago, the Camden native founded one of the first cosmetics businesses aimed at black women. Although Flori Roberts developed what is considered the first black cosmetic-product line in 1965, it is Walden who is credited with breaking barriers by getting major department stores to carry her line. "I would not take 'no' for an answer," Walden recalled in a telephone interview from her Brentwood, Calif.
SPORTS
April 14, 1987 | By STAN HOCHMAN, Daily News Sports Columnist
Charlie Thomas, the Ohio Wesleyan catcher, slumped on the cot, sobbing, clawing at his hands. "Black skin, black skin," he moaned, scrubbing at his hands, as though trying to rub the color away. "If only I could make them white. " It was the spring of 1904. Branch Rickey was coaching the Ohio Wesleyan baseball team. They had come to South Bend, Ind., to play Notre Dame and the hotel had refused to give Thomas a room. Rickey persuaded the hotel manager to place a cot in his room.
NEWS
November 30, 2007
RE CHRISTINE Flowers' op-ed "Drawing Black Borders" (Nov. 9) and John E. Calter's letter "Do Ex-offenders Deserve These Breaks?" (Nov. 12): The fact that Ms. Flowers would try to dictate to black people how they should react to the death of a white policeman shows her ignorance of the history of Africans born in America. She tells us, "A white policeman is dead; all of us should be wearing black. " Well, as a descendant of America's slave trade, I wear black every day, and I have to endure the contempt law-enforcement has toward me just because of the black skin I'm in. Cops in America have unleashed dogs on us and brutalized us with fire hoses when we peacefully marched to get a piece of the American pie. I watched as Rodney King was beaten by a police mob who was acquitted later by white justice.
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two more witnesses pointed out India Spellman on Thursday as the teenage girl in the Aug. 18, 2010 armed robbery of a Cedarbrook pedestrian and subsequent robbery-murder of an 87-year-old World War II veteran. "How you doing, baby? I forgive you," said Shirley Phillips, pointing out Spellman to the Philadelphia Common Pleas Court jury. "That girl put her gun in my face," said Phillips, 51. "I'll never forget those eyes. " Spellman, 19, had no apparent reaction to being identified by the in-home health care worker as the robber authorities say were committed with 14-year-old Von Combs.
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two more witnesses pointed out India Spellman on Thursday as the teenage girl in the Aug. 18, 2010, armed robbery of a Cedarbrook pedestrian and subsequent robbery-murder of an 87-year-old World War II veteran. "How you doing, baby? I forgive you," said Shirley Phillips, indicating Spellman to the Philadelphia Common Pleas Court jury. "That girl put her gun in my face," said Phillips, 51. "I'll never forget those eyes. " Spellman, 19, had no apparent reaction to being identified by the in-home health-care worker as the robber who authorities say committed the crimes with then-14-year-old Von Combs.
NEWS
November 12, 2003 | By Claude Lewis
You're Donovan McNabb, No. 5, the quarterback of the Philadelphia Eagles. You live your life under intense scrutiny. Some days, everything works, and on other days you can't do anything right. On bad days, even when you throw the football right on the money, your favorite receivers drop the ball. On those days, you muse about what other business you might have pursued. That's the way it is in professional sports. And it has nothing to do with skin color. When you're sacked, nobody shares your pain.
NEWS
April 6, 1996 | By Donald Scott
The anger and confusion hit me very hard one day while an undergraduate at Cheyney University more than 20 years ago. For years I had been led to believe that Jesus was a pale white man with long, flowing hair. Yes, there are many times when I heard a black Baptist minister - standing under an image of some European-looking Jesus - preaching that the "miracles" of Christ were surely evidence of his divine purpose. But when I learned from a black professor at Cheyney who taught a course about ancient civilizations that Christ likely had some African blood and therefore brown skin, I became furious.
NEWS
April 17, 1992 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
South of downtown, where the tan stucco houses start becoming grimy, where even the blue California sky is dulled by poverty, you'd expect celebration that the new police chief, Willie Williams, is black. There is joy, but there is also suspicion and mistrust and cynicism. Here, in L.A.'s poorest black neighborhoods, no one was much surprised by the now-famous videotape of white cops beating a black man with their nightsticks. And people here think it will take a lot more than a black police chief to root out the racism they say has terrorized the community for decades.
NEWS
July 6, 1992 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
A week ago, I was in Egypt, soaking up the sun and culture of Cairo. My first visit was back in 1978 when I met and talked with President Anwar Sadat. Changes there inspire awe. My purpose in going to Cairo was to examine the differences between that city (pop. 10 million) and American metropolises. The differences were many and obvious. The people possess an unmistakable pride, whether they are rich or poor, black or white. Self-pride is first, but it extends to community, region and country.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
"I THINK WHAT Kanye West is going to mean is something similar to what Steve Jobs means. I am undoubtedly, you know, Steve of Internet, downtown, fashion, culture. Period. By a long jump. I honestly feel that because Steve has passed, you know, it's like when Biggie passed, and Jay-Z was allowed to become Jay-Z. I've been connected to the most culturally important albums of the past four years, the most influential artists of the past 10 years . . . I got the answers. I understand culture.
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two more witnesses pointed out India Spellman on Thursday as the teenage girl in the Aug. 18, 2010 armed robbery of a Cedarbrook pedestrian and subsequent robbery-murder of an 87-year-old World War II veteran. "How you doing, baby? I forgive you," said Shirley Phillips, pointing out Spellman to the Philadelphia Common Pleas Court jury. "That girl put her gun in my face," said Phillips, 51. "I'll never forget those eyes. " Spellman, 19, had no apparent reaction to being identified by the in-home health care worker as the robber authorities say were committed with 14-year-old Von Combs.
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two more witnesses pointed out India Spellman on Thursday as the teenage girl in the Aug. 18, 2010, armed robbery of a Cedarbrook pedestrian and subsequent robbery-murder of an 87-year-old World War II veteran. "How you doing, baby? I forgive you," said Shirley Phillips, indicating Spellman to the Philadelphia Common Pleas Court jury. "That girl put her gun in my face," said Phillips, 51. "I'll never forget those eyes. " Spellman, 19, had no apparent reaction to being identified by the in-home health-care worker as the robber who authorities say committed the crimes with then-14-year-old Von Combs.
NEWS
November 30, 2007
RE CHRISTINE Flowers' op-ed "Drawing Black Borders" (Nov. 9) and John E. Calter's letter "Do Ex-offenders Deserve These Breaks?" (Nov. 12): The fact that Ms. Flowers would try to dictate to black people how they should react to the death of a white policeman shows her ignorance of the history of Africans born in America. She tells us, "A white policeman is dead; all of us should be wearing black. " Well, as a descendant of America's slave trade, I wear black every day, and I have to endure the contempt law-enforcement has toward me just because of the black skin I'm in. Cops in America have unleashed dogs on us and brutalized us with fire hoses when we peacefully marched to get a piece of the American pie. I watched as Rodney King was beaten by a police mob who was acquitted later by white justice.
SPORTS
April 8, 2007
When Branch Rickey was coaching University of Michigan baseball in the early 20th century, his team took a road trip to play against Notre Dame. The site wasn't down South, but rather in South Bend, Indiana. Yet Rickey's one black player, Charles Thomas, was denied a room at the hotel. Rickey persuaded the hotel manager to allow Thomas to stay in his room. Then he told Thomas to go to the room and wait for him while he completed the arrangements. When Rickey joined his young player, the coach found Thomas tugging at his hands lamenting, "Black skin . . . if I could only make 'em white . " Some think that this story, oft-told by Rickey, is apocryphal.
SPORTS
February 7, 2005 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Donovan McNabb ran onto the field at the start of Super Bowl XXXIX last night, Eagles fans everywhere erupted in an emotional outburst of hope and joy. But at that moment, it was pride, not passion, that brought a lump to the throat of a feisty old man in Columbus, Ohio. "I like that McNabb a lot," Ralph Goldston said. "I guess we've got something in common. " They do. Black skin. A silver-and-green uniform. And a connection in Eagles history. Fifty-three years before McNabb led this franchise to its first Super Bowl appearance in nearly a quarter-century, Goldston, a running back from Youngstown State, and another Ohio native named Don Stevens became the first blacks to play for the Eagles.
NEWS
November 12, 2003 | By Claude Lewis
You're Donovan McNabb, No. 5, the quarterback of the Philadelphia Eagles. You live your life under intense scrutiny. Some days, everything works, and on other days you can't do anything right. On bad days, even when you throw the football right on the money, your favorite receivers drop the ball. On those days, you muse about what other business you might have pursued. That's the way it is in professional sports. And it has nothing to do with skin color. When you're sacked, nobody shares your pain.
NEWS
April 6, 1996 | By Donald Scott
The anger and confusion hit me very hard one day while an undergraduate at Cheyney University more than 20 years ago. For years I had been led to believe that Jesus was a pale white man with long, flowing hair. Yes, there are many times when I heard a black Baptist minister - standing under an image of some European-looking Jesus - preaching that the "miracles" of Christ were surely evidence of his divine purpose. But when I learned from a black professor at Cheyney who taught a course about ancient civilizations that Christ likely had some African blood and therefore brown skin, I became furious.
NEWS
December 17, 1994 | By MOLEFI KETE ASANTE
Old myths die hard even when they have been repeatedly battered with facts and the sad thing is that these myths are often supported by people like Jonathan Zimmerman (See "Tell the Truth About Thanksgiving," Nov. 25) who occupy academic positions. For example, Zimmerman, who teaches history at West Chester University, claims that there is not "credible evidence" that Africans came to the Americas before Columbus. In fact, there are a number of books written on this subject based on Al-Omari's account of the voyages of the Malian king, Abubakari, in 1311-12.
NEWS
November 6, 1994 | By Mark Bowden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sitting on a bench waiting for the Broad Street subway yesterday afternoon, young Shafee Brown of Logan was the very picture of Susan V. Smith's mythical kidnapper. Medium build, about 5-8, knit cap . . . black skin. "Yeah, I know," he said, shaking his head sadly. "You know? I believed that woman, too. I mean, how could anybody believe that a mother would do that to her own children?" In addition to the horror of her crime, Smith's invented alibi effectively slandered Brown, along with every black man in America.
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