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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1986 | By RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
It's doubtful that even one-in-500,000 viewers of the "The Cosby Show" understood the reference when Bill Cosby's TV wife tells her daughter, "Never get in a car with a stranger - not even if he's as suave and handsome as Lorenzo Tucker. " In the end, Tucker - known in his day as "The Colored Valentino" - lived in obscurity, working as a night security guard so he could make the rounds of the Hollywood studios by day in what became a fruitless search for movie or TV roles. And when Tucker died in August at 79, it was a professor of film from Glassboro, N.J., who had to contact the Actors Fund for funeral expenses and inform the Philadelphia press that a forgotten hometown hero had died in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2011 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When Mos Def and Talib Kweli started Black Star in the 1990s, they didn't create hip-hop based on bling, boastfulness, or violence. With the killings of Tupac Shakur and Notorious B.I.G. before them, the righteous, literate rappers Def and Kweli formed their union based on the ideals of Marcus Garvey, founder of the United Negro Improvement Association, and his Black Star shipping line. Garvey's concerns about the African American community - pride, respect, consciousness - were shared by Def and Kweli, and acted as a gentle but formidable tonic to the chaos surrounding them.
NEWS
April 26, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just a few blocks from the 13-year-old Franklin Field, where the young black man with the long stride had become one of Philadelphia's best-known athletes, a great crowd gathered outside his parents' house at 3323 Woodland Ave. Later on that chilled December day in 1908, a long procession of horse-drawn carriages and a few motor cars headed west to Collingdale's Eden Cemetery, where John Baxter Taylor was mourned thoroughly, eulogized grandly, and...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1987 | By GENE SISKEL, Special to the Daily News
A relaxed, jovial Eddie Murphy met the press for a full hour in New York recently, immediately after they had watched, mostly in stony silence, a preview of "Beverly Hills Cop II," the sequel to one of the top-grossing film comedies of all time. "It's hard to watch a picture with you all, 'cause you all don't loosen up," Murphy said, standing behind a lectern dressed in a designer Zorro-style outfit - black leather suit, black hat, black gloves and zebra-stripe boots. "If there's a joke, you don't laugh, you sit there writing in your note pads, 'That works; that doesn't.
NEWS
December 21, 2007
I'M OFFENDED and disappointed with Oprah Winfrey's foray into politics. She's using her cult of personality to back a charismatic but very inexperienced male candidate named Barack Obama. After years on her personal pulpit espousing the power and glory of women, she dumps Hillary, who she praised many times on her show, for a rising black star in the Democratic Party. It's time for Oprah to be more color-blind and practice her gender sensitivity. Anthony J. Frascino, Cherry Hill
NEWS
November 1, 2004 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When you've been waiting for five years, what's another 2 1/2 hours? Saturday night at the Electric Factory, the packed house had much to look forward to: the return to rhyming of Mos Def, the rapper/actor whose The New Danger is his first album in five years; plus his only scheduled U.S. tour date with Talib Kweli, his partner on the landmark 1998 conscious rap collaboration, Black Star. So the assembled hip-hop heads were relatively easygoing when the opener, J-Live, was a no-show, and the hours passed without any entertainment other than records by LL Cool J, Rob Base, and the Roots.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2009 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
The rapper-turned-actor Mos Def has done his most engaging work in front of a camera and not a microphone in recent years. From his canny impersonation of Chuck Berry in the Chess Records biopic Cadillac Records to a guest shot on last season's House and a string of bit parts on Chappelle's Show, he has proved himself a versatile and inspired performer, but his rhyming skills ossified as his acting career blossomed. That changed this spring with the release of his fourth solo album, The Ecstatic.
NEWS
February 17, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
If anyone out there has a giant (27-inch by 41-inch) original MGM-issued poster for the 1929 King Vidor film Hallelujah! , John Kisch would very much like to meet you. The director of A Separate Cinema, an archive of almost 35,000 posters, lobby cards, film stills, and graphic images chronicling the history of black cinema in America - from the Silent Era to the not-at-all-silent Tyler Perry - Kisch is still on the prowl, 40 years since he began...
NEWS
July 17, 2007 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
When it comes to Mos Def, you find yourself almost blinded by his promise. He's a guy who does so many things well. As a rapper, Def put himself on the sociopolitical conscious tip as Black Star (with Talib Kweli). Then came the incendiary blast of 1999's solo Black on Both Sides. By giving his characters consequence, world-political outlook, danger and sexuality, he made each tale on the record richly theatrical. But Mos waited an eternity to follow up with 2004's The New Danger.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1986 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
Several black actors who starred in the ABC miniseries "Roots," said their roles did not lead to better parts since the program was aired in 1977, according to TV Guide magazine. "Roots had such a profound impact on people around the world," said Beverly Todd, who played the slave Fanta, Kunta Kinte's (LeVar Burton) love interest in the miniseries. "But in terms of the work generated for black artists, it just faded away to become another media event. " Leslie Uggams, who played Kizzy in "Roots," says that except for Diahann Carroll of ABC's "Dynasty," it's rare a black star is seen on nighttime soaps.
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NEWS
July 31, 2015
The BlackStar Film Festival runs from Thursday to Sunday, featuring some of the best films from black directors, writers, and documentarians encompassing the African diaspora. Films such as BaddDDD Sonia Sanchez and dream hampton's Treasure: From Tragedy to Trans Justice, Mapping a Detroit Story aren't the only must-sees at the fest. We chose five more. All tickets are $12; $8 for students or seniors: Life Essentials with Ruby Dee: Director Muta'Ali Muhammad tells the story of his grandparents, who happen to be famed actors and activists Ruby Dee and Ossie Davis.
NEWS
July 31, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When the BlackStar Film Festival, highlighting cinema culled from the African diaspora, hits venues around University City starting Thursday, it will bring its usual retinue of serious narrative and documentary fare. BlackStar's closing film happens to be its starkest, darkest entry: Treasure: From Tragedy to Trans Justice, Mapping a Detroit Story , a documentary from filmmaker dream hampton about the vicious 2011 murder of a black trans teen, 19-year-old Shelley "Treasure" Hilliard, who was ritually burned and dismembered, as though her murderer had a desire to erase rather than kill.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
On Saturday at the Annenberg School for Communication, the BlackStar Film Festival spotlights movies by local youths and kids from around the country, screening short films written, directed, and produced by African American filmmakers 14 to 22. The festival, which features indie black films, continues through Sunday at International House with celebrity appearances and post-film Q&A sessions. Saturday's cinematic journey begins at 1:30 p.m. with the full-length film Troop 491: The Adventures of the Muddy Lions , about a young boy caught between the code of the street and the Boy Scouts.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When she brought Philadelphia's BlackStar Film Festival into being two years ago, Maori Holmes, its producing artistic director, was carrying out an imperative. She thought it necessary, she says, "to address what felt then - and feels now - like an absence of representation of people of African descent in the mainstream festivals in town. " Even black film fests have tended to cast the spotlight on "Hollywood films that feature black people," Holmes says. But she wanted to look beyond the best-knowns - the Spike Lees, the Steve McQueens - and "create a space" to explore the African diaspora and "global black identity through an independent lens.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
OMAR coming! Michael K. Williams , of "The Wire," who also was seen in last weekend's box-office success "The Purge: Anarchy" and in HBO's "Boardwalk Empire," will be an honored guest at the BlackStar Film Festival, taking place July 31 to Aug. 3. Williams is in "They Die by Dawn," a neo-Western also featuring Giancarlo Esposito ("Breaking Bad"), Jesse Williams ("Grey's Anatomy"), Rosario Dawson ("Men in Black II"), Isaiah Washington ("Grey's Anatomy") and Erykah Badu . Williams will appear with director Jeymes Samuel at the screening at International House (3701 Chestnut St.)
NEWS
March 22, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
GLASSBORO As a high school student, Madeline Brewer was a bit of an outsider, shy and subject to criticism over her hopes of going into acting. As an actress known for her role as the cornrowed, tattooed, and drug-addicted Tricia on Orange Is the New Black , Brewer finds many of those insecurities remain despite her success. "Everybody struggles with things, and although you can think someone is the most put-together person, everybody struggles. There's always something to overcome," Brewer said, noting the entertainment industry can be "very unforgiving to women.
NEWS
February 17, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
If anyone out there has a giant (27-inch by 41-inch) original MGM-issued poster for the 1929 King Vidor film Hallelujah! , John Kisch would very much like to meet you. The director of A Separate Cinema, an archive of almost 35,000 posters, lobby cards, film stills, and graphic images chronicling the history of black cinema in America - from the Silent Era to the not-at-all-silent Tyler Perry - Kisch is still on the prowl, 40 years since he began...
NEWS
August 24, 2012 | By Alyssa Rosenberg, SLATE
WASHINGTON - The news came this week that movie director Tony Scott had committed suicide by leaping from a Los Angeles bridge, and many of the remembrances have focused on his most famous action movies, including Top Gun , and his kinetic visual style. But as interesting as how he told his stories is the people they were about. Scott frequently directed black stars, including Eddie Murphy in Beverly Hills Cop II , Wesley Snipes in The Fan , Will Smith in Enemy of the State , and his frequent leading man Denzel Washington in Man on Fire , Deja Vu , his remake of The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3, and Unstoppable . And while action movies with male main characters made up much of his career, Scott's movies also included a number of fascinating, unsettling roles for women.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
'I didn't know it would be a festival. " That's Maori Karmael Holmes, artistic director of the first annual BlackStar Film Festival, which runs Thursday through Sunday at the African American Museum, Art Sanctuary, and International House. It wasn't supposed to get this big, but now BlackStar is four days of black films and filmmakers from all over the globe - "40 films, 4 continents, 4 days. " Holmes has been "curating films in and around Philadelphia for years. I wanted to do a showcase of some films at International House," in West Philadelphia, she says, "and I secured the dates months and months ago. " But as she started talking to people, she heard of filmmakers and films crying out for larger audiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2012 | By Molly Eichel and Daily News Staff Writer
MAORI Karmael Holmes didn't set out to create a film festival. She had booked some dates at West Philly's International House simply to screen some good movies about the African experience. But there were so many worthy entries to choose from, she couldn't bear to pare them down. "I'm pretty pragmatic, but I do dream big," said Holmes, a graduate of Temple University's Master of Fine Arts program and, by day, the associate director of the Leeway Foundation, a nonprofit that focuses on women and the transgendered.
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