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Black Troops

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NEWS
February 14, 1990 | By Ed Voves, Special to The Inquirer
The Civil War ended nearly 125 years ago, but for Lee W. Jackson and Herbert Kaufman, the events of that war - particularly the 1863 battle re- created in the recent film Glory - are not just memories. They are the deeds of living history. Jackson and Kaufman are Civil War enthusiasts. In their own ways, Jackson, who served as an extra in the movie, and Kaufman are seeking to heighten public awareness of the neglected story of black troops in the Union Army. Kaufman, 45, of Huntingdon Valley, volunteers at the Grand Army of the Republic Museum and Library, 4278 Griscom St., in Frankford.
NEWS
March 19, 1997 | By Stone Brown
I feel a duty, as a writer and student of history, to address the insulting letters (March 14) viciously attacking Linda Wright Moore's column (Feb. 20) on slave reparations. Many of the letters referred to whites shedding "blood" during the Civil War to "free" blacks, government entitlements, the Martin Luther King holiday and Black History Month as forms of reparations to blacks. Government entitlements (welfare, food stamps, and subsidized housing) are not in any form reparations for the enslavement of African people.
NEWS
February 19, 1987
As a white person, I have good reason to recognize Black History Month and would like to share its personal significance to me in a reference to one of my ancestors. My great-great-grandfather John Gorman served in the Union army as a lieutenant until his near-fatal wounding in July 1864 in an engagement at Petersburg, Va., in a battle that came to be known as the Battle of the Crater. A Union army engineer sold his superiors on a plan to dig a tunnel under the heavy Confederate entrenchments, to place explosives under that line and blow a breach in the Confederate lines.
NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Larry Margasak, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - They sat in wheelchairs as honored guests at President Obama's second inaugural, attended to almost minute-by-minute by active-duty members of the military. For these Tuskegee Airmen, members of the famed all-black unit of World War II and several years beyond, the tables surely turned. From the terrace of the Capitol, they watched an African American president being sworn in for his second term. And they were cared for reverently by many whites in uniform, who more than six decades ago would have had no contact with these two dozen veterans now sitting with green Army blankets across their laps.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
After suffering a series of setbacks in the early days of the Korean War, U.S. officials were anxious for a victory. They got it on July 21, 1950, when the Buffalo Soldiers of the Army's 24th Infantry Regiment, which had just arrived in Korea, retook Yechon in a counterattack. Though the victory was short-lived, U.S. Rep. Thomas Lane of Massachusetts stood before the House and praised the black troops "who believed not only in the United States as it is, but in the nation that it will become when intolerance is also defeated.
NEWS
February 6, 2000 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Sixth United States Colored Infantry, largely recruited and wholly trained in our region, fought as free men for the Union, but at enormous personal cost. In his recent book, Strike the Blow for Freedom (White Mane Books, 1999), James M. Paradis of Abington tells the story of this unit, which suffered mass casualties to illness, battle and the emotional trauma of war. The book, which adds to a growing number of histories of black Civil War regiments, offers sound scholarship with a human face.
NEWS
April 4, 1989 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Staff Writer
The thin, barefoot prisoners were led in past the bloody uniforms and captured weapons of their dead comrades. Firefights between SWAPO and South African units crackled in the distance yesterday as the two young guerrillas were presented by their captors. Phillipus Mateus and Johannes Kutumba were among the rare survivors, on the rebel side, of the brutal warfare that broke out last week on what was to have been the eve of peace. Captured Sunday, two days after SWAPO forces inexplicably flooded across the border from their bases in Angola, Mateus said the 30 guerrillas with him had all died.
NEWS
October 23, 1994 | By Tanika White, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Lyndia Grant is entering names on her computer. She flips through packets of photocopies of index cards bearing men's names in long, scrawling handwriting. Although she is quick, she is accurate. These are people's lives, people's histories, people's futures that she holds in her hands. Grant is the director of the Washington data-entry site of the African American Civil War Freedom Foundation, a group dedicated to researching and documenting the names of the little-known men who served in the United States Colored Troops during the Civil War. Next month, all 178,000 names will be available to the public.
NEWS
February 23, 1992 | By Al Haas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just in time for Black History Month, Hippocrene Books has published the Hippocrene Guide to Black America, a fascinating tour of the cultural and historical sites that punctuate the African American story. This newest addition to Hippocrene Books' guide series is an $11.95 paperback by Marcella Thum, who has written before on the African American heritage. Organized by state, it describes some 700 significant sites, ranging from historic homes and art and history museums to churches, battlefields and civil rights landmarks.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
Tony Green has what you might call a passion for the Civil War. But it's a passion that goes beyond that of a mere history buff. Green's great-uncle, Benjamin Green of Philadelphia, joined the Union Army in 1863 and was assigned to the Sixth Regiment of the United States Colored Troops. That history has passed down through the generations into Tony Green's hands. Today, Green presides over a small, New Jersey-based, multiracial group known as the Civil War Brotherhood, whose purpose is to preserve the memories and the relics of that period in American history.
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NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
After suffering a series of setbacks in the early days of the Korean War, U.S. officials were anxious for a victory. They got it on July 21, 1950, when the Buffalo Soldiers of the Army's 24th Infantry Regiment, which had just arrived in Korea, retook Yechon in a counterattack. Though the victory was short-lived, U.S. Rep. Thomas Lane of Massachusetts stood before the House and praised the black troops "who believed not only in the United States as it is, but in the nation that it will become when intolerance is also defeated.
NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Larry Margasak, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - They sat in wheelchairs as honored guests at President Obama's second inaugural, attended to almost minute-by-minute by active-duty members of the military. For these Tuskegee Airmen, members of the famed all-black unit of World War II and several years beyond, the tables surely turned. From the terrace of the Capitol, they watched an African American president being sworn in for his second term. And they were cared for reverently by many whites in uniform, who more than six decades ago would have had no contact with these two dozen veterans now sitting with green Army blankets across their laps.
NEWS
December 8, 2009
Creating enemies with aerial strikes Post-9/11 U.S. military action has so often disregarded civilian safety that official characterization of "collateral damage" as a tragic aberration lacks good faith. By even a ridiculously low estimate, the U.S. military has killed several times more innocent people than the terrorists did on 9/11 ("Escalate, then exit," Dec. 2). I don't totally reject a military component to U.S. policy on Afghanistan. If there are bad guys out there, fight them on the ground.
NEWS
July 4, 2007 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Better than a commutation Mere days before her DUI trial begins on July 11, news comes that Real Life poet Nicole Richie, 25, is pregnant - a condition that may save her from jail. TMZ.com, which says it has confirmed the pregnancy, says the pa is Nicole's bf, 28-year-old Good Charlotte singer Joel Madden. And In Touch Weekly says the couple are hard at work planning a summer wedding. (Better get a move on.) Nicole's legal troubles stem from a December incident during which she was busted driving the wrong way down an L.A. freeway and proceeded to admit to the cops that she was on marijuana and Vicodin.
NEWS
December 7, 2003 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
During the Civil War, there were only 14 black chaplains in the Union Army but there were nearly 200,000 black troops, according to Strike the Blow for Freedom, a history of one of the regiments. That little-known fact was startling to Jim Paradis, who has taught American history for 17 years at St. Mary's Hall/Doane Academy in Burlington City. Before learning that, he thought he knew quite a bit about the War Between the States. He had stumbled upon a 1913 book that seemed to detail the regiments formed in Philadelphia during the war. "It was a fascinating book that devoted pages to each of the regiments, many of whom had illustrious records," said Paradis, who went on to write Strike the Blow.
NEWS
February 23, 2003 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Philippa Duke Schuyler might not be a household name, but as lives go, hers was pretty remarkable. The only child of an African American journalist and a wealthy white farmer's daughter, Schuyler played Mozart and composed music from an early age, became a world-class pianist, had a day named after her at the New York World's Fair, and died at age 35. Norristown resident Russell Shockley would like more people to know about Schuyler and other...
NEWS
February 3, 2002 | By Chris Gray and Nora Koch INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In the Civil War papers of his great-grandfather William Henry Beck, Benjamin Franklin Beck sees a little of himself. Both men fought in the controversial military struggles of their time, the Civil War and Vietnam. Both men sustained disabling injuries that affected their lives after leaving the service. Now in honor of his long-deceased relative, Benjamin Beck dons the blue wool uniform and slouchy "bummer" cap of the Third Regiment Infantry of the U.S. Colored Troops and teaches others about African American involvement in the Civil War, an often-overlooked facet of history.
NEWS
February 6, 2000 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Sixth United States Colored Infantry, largely recruited and wholly trained in our region, fought as free men for the Union, but at enormous personal cost. In his recent book, Strike the Blow for Freedom (White Mane Books, 1999), James M. Paradis of Abington tells the story of this unit, which suffered mass casualties to illness, battle and the emotional trauma of war. The book, which adds to a growing number of histories of black Civil War regiments, offers sound scholarship with a human face.
NEWS
November 10, 1998 | By Meredith Fischer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A swastika spray-painted on the back of a Valley Forge National Historical Park war memorial to black Revolutionary War soldiers will not fade easily. Park officials said the paint used to desecrate the Patriots of African-American Descent Monument has seeped into the memorial's porous rock and formed a stain that for some will leave a lasting impression. "The chemicals have lightened it some," said Park Superintendent Arthur Stewart. "But so far, it is still there. What they have done is taken a national symbol and trashed it. " The swastika, about three feet in height, was first spotted about 2 p.m. Sunday by a woman running along the park's multi-use trail, adjacent to Route 23. It was the second time a swastika has been painted on the monument.
NEWS
July 23, 1998 | By Karen E. Quinones Miller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They served America with honor and valor during world crisis, and for their dedication they are being rewarded - more than 50 years after the fact. "It would have been nice to get it while we were still wearing a uniform," said Andrew W. Nix Jr., a North Philadelphia funeral director who is one of five African American World War II veterans to be awarded the Bronze Star in a ceremony today at the Pentagon. Honored will be J. C. Wade of Irving, Texas; Mate Montgomery of Chapman, Ala.; Vincent R. Malveaux of the Bronx, N.Y.; Marteller Pollock of Atlanta; and Nix. Nix, who is in South Africa on business until next week, will be represented by his wife, Dorothy.
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