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ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1986 | By RICK SELVIN, Daily News Staff Writer
"Say, why don't we break outta this smoky joint and go up to my place? I've got some great oil-on-velvet paintings - you know, Elvis, John Wayne, and a fabulous Sylvester Stallone - you'll love 'em. Oh well, another lonely night. Seems no one appreciates original artwork anymore. Like, just because you buy your paintings from a stand on an Exxon parking lot, doesn't make it schlock, right? What'd she mean, anyway, " 'Your taste is in your mouth, pal' "? Taste. It's all relative.
NEWS
May 8, 1992
Remember Ann Gorsuch Burford, the Sludge Queen? She was the loyal, true-believing venal nitwit Ronald Reagan put in charge of the Environmental Protection Agency, in one of the Great Communicator's few recorded attempts at black humor. What we taxpayers hadn't understood at the time is that the Sludge Queen never had any intention of protecting the environment. Her mandate was to make sure polluters made the right political contributions, that Superfund money could be misused by polluters and criminals in government and to make sure the president remained blissfully ignorant enough to retain his quaint belief that trees cause pollution.
NEWS
April 11, 1987 | By Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ralph Lauren brought a sense of British refinement to the fall collections, while Oscar de la Renta upped the ante on rich, glamour dressing with his leopard-patterned shoes and hats, curvy, fitted suits, and lavish ballgowns that would be a perfect foil for the Duchess of Windsor's jewels. And Seventh Avenue's much-heralded newcomer, David Cameron, harked back to the '60s with chiseled black minidresses in stretch wool punctuated with tiny silver zippers. Like just about every other designer on the face of the earth, Ralph Lauren showed short skirts Wednesday - about two inches above the knee - but they were so discreetly done one seldom noticed that the models' knees were bared.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1986 | Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
Women in the market for elegant, luxurious clothes - the sort that go nicely with diamonds and sables - need only do two-stop shopping this fall: at the salons of Valentino and Emanuel Ungaro. The two designers, who between them clothe just about all of the socialites, film stars and royals in Europe, don't skimp when it comes to designing sleek, dressy daywear and glamorous, entrance-making evening gowns. "These are rich-lady clothes, and they look it," commented Dawn Mello, president of Bergdorf Goodman, after Valentino's big, beautiful show Monday night.
LIVING
March 23, 1995 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Yves Saint Laurent put his ever-elegant stamp on a Paris season that, at last, has returned classy clothes to the limelight. And who can be more classy, and classic, than Saint Laurent? He has reigned for more than 30 years by designing refined apparel that makes women look beautiful. His show Tuesday was a fitting finale to the weeklong fall fashion previews here, a week in which conservative style took hold. French designers rediscovered wearable, well-made clothes and showed them instead of their standard outrageous fare.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2014 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
American Idol and its ilk have taught us to regard a singer's voice the way progressive-rock fans once cooed over instrumental solos. But what made Aretha Franklin, who performed at Revel Ovation Hall in Atlantic City on Saturday night, an epoch-defining figure was not simply talent or even technique, but judgment - not the notes she could hit but when she chose to hit them. Before she was the Queen of Soul - an honorific that also serves as the title of Rhino Records' nicely remastered recent collection - Franklin spent the better part of the 1960s letting producers pair her with overorchestrated jazz and pop standards, with results equivalent to a Van Gogh painted on black velvet.
NEWS
March 25, 1987 | By Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fall ready-to-wear collections of Valentino and Emanuel Ungaro represent two sides of the same luxurious, feminine fashion coin: one sleek and tailored, the other soft and pouffy. Both designers' creations demand scrupulous attention to accessories - ridiculously high heels, sheer black stockings, elaborate hats, extravagant jewelry. The women who wear these clothes are too rich and too thin, and too devoted to their pet designers, to ever question whether the clothes are a trifle silly and overdone.
NEWS
May 3, 1990 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
The bride wore ivory satin with a floral lace overlay and a lace tiara. Her gaze never wavered and she spoke not a word. She was 29 inches tall. The "bride" - circa 1900 - was one of 28 dolls from John Burbidge's "Les Petites Dames de Mode" collection on display at the Valley Forge Convention Center on Sunday. The "little ladies of fashion" were the main attraction at the fourth annual Delaware Valley Doll Show sponsored by the Women's Board of Lankenau Hospital. Proceeds of the event will benefit the medical research center at the hospital, said Susan Hellwege, chairman of the committee that organized the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1986 | By MADELINE DAVIS, Daily News Finds Columnist
What did Doris Day and Grace Kelly have in common besides the leading men of the 1950s? The actresses were fond of using headbands to keep their honey- blond hair off their creamy white but lightly freckled faces. Like many popular items from that era, headbands are making a comeback. Women everywhere who have enough hair to pull back are using headbands to do it. One of the nicest we've seen is available at Ann Taylor stores. This mini piece of millinery is covered in black velvet - campy for day wear, chic at night.
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | Daily News staff reports and Chic Simple
Got the "What do I wear?" blues this holiday season? We've got the antidote: Thanksgiving dinner This is a relatively subdued occasion, so don't go crazy. Save the sexy stuff for New Year's Eve. And don't wear anything tight - you need a waistband that forgives if you're planning to pig out. No Eagles jerseys, sweatsuits or athletic gear, please. Enough said. Now's the time to break out the black velvet. A black velvet skirt or pants will take you through the entire holiday season.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2014 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
American Idol and its ilk have taught us to regard a singer's voice the way progressive-rock fans once cooed over instrumental solos. But what made Aretha Franklin, who performed at Revel Ovation Hall in Atlantic City on Saturday night, an epoch-defining figure was not simply talent or even technique, but judgment - not the notes she could hit but when she chose to hit them. Before she was the Queen of Soul - an honorific that also serves as the title of Rhino Records' nicely remastered recent collection - Franklin spent the better part of the 1960s letting producers pair her with overorchestrated jazz and pop standards, with results equivalent to a Van Gogh painted on black velvet.
NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
The word distaff began life as a noun denoting an implement used in spinning flax and wool. These days it's most often encountered as an adjective (and a cliche) to characterize women's work or the female domestic realm in general. One of these antique mother's helpers stands at the entrance to an exhibition called "Reimagining the Distaff Toolkit," now in the Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College. Larry Ruhl, one of 27 artists in this traveling exhibition, presents the early 20th-century distaff, an ovoid basket form on a stick, as a Duchampian "readymade" sculpture.
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | Daily News staff reports and Chic Simple
Got the "What do I wear?" blues this holiday season? We've got the antidote: Thanksgiving dinner This is a relatively subdued occasion, so don't go crazy. Save the sexy stuff for New Year's Eve. And don't wear anything tight - you need a waistband that forgives if you're planning to pig out. No Eagles jerseys, sweatsuits or athletic gear, please. Enough said. Now's the time to break out the black velvet. A black velvet skirt or pants will take you through the entire holiday season.
FOOD
June 14, 1998 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Some people sing and dance for investors when trying to raise money to open a restaurant. Others cut open the mattress they've been stuffing and part with their life savings. But at the corner of 10th and Hall Streets in South Philadelphia, Frankie "Shank" Perri Jr. built a nest egg from a more unlikely source. He sold Christmas trees. In December 1996, Perri, 37, stood with 360 Douglas firs across the street from Shank's & Evelyn's, the legendary roast-beef luncheonette founded by his parents, where he came of age to the fragrant smell of giant giambotti omelets cooking and began his own career at the griddle.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1998 | By Murray Dubin, Dianna Marder and Jaqueline L. Urgo, FOR THE INQUIRER Inquirer Staff Writers Edward Colimore and Ralph Cipriano also contributed to this story
He was a working-class hero who liked his eggs fried in olive oil, not butter. He was cocky and kind, a skinny Italian with a taste for ricotta, ravioli and aged provolone, extra sharp. He crooned "Chicago, Chicago" and owned "New York, New York," but it was this region, South Philadelphia to South Jersey, that belonged to him. He sang no Philadelphia song, but his voice was ours for nearly six decades. Beginning in 1939, he performed everywhere, from the Steel Pier to the Spectrum, from the Latin Casino in Cherry Hill to the CR Club in South Philadelphia to the Sands in Atlantic City.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1996 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Charles Busch arrives on stage in the Barrymore Room of the Bellevue Hotel wearing a black velvet top; a green, flouncy wraparound skirt; and a smashing red wig. Later, he removes the skirt to reveal a pair of black pants that hug his trim figure like Saran Wrap. It is an altogether fetching outfit; if only he had some cabaret material to go with it. Busch is, of course, the New York drag artist - "gender illusionist," to the politically correct - who has written and starred in such outre hit plays as Vampire Lesbians of Sodom and Psycho Beach Party.
LIVING
March 23, 1995 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Yves Saint Laurent put his ever-elegant stamp on a Paris season that, at last, has returned classy clothes to the limelight. And who can be more classy, and classic, than Saint Laurent? He has reigned for more than 30 years by designing refined apparel that makes women look beautiful. His show Tuesday was a fitting finale to the weeklong fall fashion previews here, a week in which conservative style took hold. French designers rediscovered wearable, well-made clothes and showed them instead of their standard outrageous fare.
NEWS
May 8, 1992
Remember Ann Gorsuch Burford, the Sludge Queen? She was the loyal, true-believing venal nitwit Ronald Reagan put in charge of the Environmental Protection Agency, in one of the Great Communicator's few recorded attempts at black humor. What we taxpayers hadn't understood at the time is that the Sludge Queen never had any intention of protecting the environment. Her mandate was to make sure polluters made the right political contributions, that Superfund money could be misused by polluters and criminals in government and to make sure the president remained blissfully ignorant enough to retain his quaint belief that trees cause pollution.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Kate Tyndall, Special to The Inquirer
It should come as no surprise that the king of corsets and cone bras has teamed up with America's most theatrical pop singer. Madonna chose Jean Paul Gaultier, Paris' guru of the avant-garde, to produce the clothes for her Blond Ambition world tour, which began in Tokyo in April and starts a three-day run at the Spectrum in Philadelphia tomorrow night. The man who sent models clad as nuns down the runway at his women's-wear show last fall, who has been known to use tin cans and plastic garbage bags as design inspirations and who revels in corsets, seems a perfect match for the singer who changes her image as often as most people change their clothes.
NEWS
May 3, 1990 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
The bride wore ivory satin with a floral lace overlay and a lace tiara. Her gaze never wavered and she spoke not a word. She was 29 inches tall. The "bride" - circa 1900 - was one of 28 dolls from John Burbidge's "Les Petites Dames de Mode" collection on display at the Valley Forge Convention Center on Sunday. The "little ladies of fashion" were the main attraction at the fourth annual Delaware Valley Doll Show sponsored by the Women's Board of Lankenau Hospital. Proceeds of the event will benefit the medical research center at the hospital, said Susan Hellwege, chairman of the committee that organized the show.
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