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Black Woman

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NEWS
October 4, 2000 | by Cheryl D. Mills
It really was a beautiful thing: presidential candidates making nice to a black woman and meaning it. You don't see that every day in America. But when Oprah calls, even would-be presidents answer. Appearing on "Oprah" gave George W. Bush and Al Gore the chance to reach out to the all-so-important-but-only-at-election-time women's vote. Only during campaign season do you hear this many pundits and politicians talking about the "power of women. " Especially about the power of black women.
NEWS
September 28, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Staff Writer
If black women don't shift their conventional ways of thinking, joy will never be theirs, warns journalist and South Jersey native Sophia A. Nelson. And that is awful. "The journey to happiness is a marathon, not a sprint," Nelson said recently. "We all have to take a good look at ourselves and be willing to take it. " This journey is at the core of Nelson's new and much-talked-about book, Black Woman Redefined: Dispelling Myths and Discovering Fulfillment in the Age of Michelle Obama . In 11 chapters, Nelson takes on issues like dating outside the race, the impact of the church on black women, a tougher-than-nails attitude, and rape.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2012
WE'VE NEVER seen first lady Michelle Obama yelling or arguing with anyone. So why can't she shake the notion that she's angry? Worse, that she's an angry black woman. If you think about it, it makes no sense. Obama, who turned 48 yesterday, graduated from both Princeton and Harvard and is married to the most powerful man in the world. Her daughters are adorable. Their food - organic - is prepared by White House chefs. She has her own staff and gets to work on causes she's passionate about.
NEWS
August 8, 1990 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Talking with playwright Marian Hammonds Warrington, it's easy to understand why the voices of her characters, particularly black women, ring with what one critic called "richness of feeling. " There's an intensity about Warrington. Even when she is still, one can sense that she swells inside with emotion, that if she could, she would take all black womanhood in her arms and whisper in their ears poetic words, stirring them to confront the reality of their lives and to define themselves by their own terms.
LIVING
May 6, 1996 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Noise. Way too much of it. Connie Briscoe noticed it when she arrived at the Convention Center to read at Sistahs! - the recent celebration of African American women. Voices buzzed around her like flies. Background noises - the hiss of helium being pumped into balloons; music blasting through loudspeakers; a joyous but raucous gospel choir - all of which seemed to hover right over the place where Briscoe was scheduled to read from her latest novel, Big Girls Don't Cry. Uh-oh.
NEWS
October 24, 2007 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Anita Allen remembers an extraordinary remark made by one of her white, male University of Michigan philosophy professors in the 1970s when she was in graduate school seeking a Ph.D. in philosophy - a field that at the time lacked a single black woman professor. " 'Anita,' he told me," recalls Allen between the good-natured laughs that punctuate the seriousness of what she says, " 'you will have to pee on the floor of the American Philosophical Association convention to not get a job in philosophy.
NEWS
May 5, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - Tamron Hall made history early this year when she became the first black woman to coanchor Today 's news hours, joining Natalie Morales, Willie Geist, and Al Roker on the morning show's plush orange sofas. In an instant, the Temple University graduate - who is serious and to-the-point on MSNBC's NewsNation , and a compassionate listener on Investigation Discovery's Deadline Crime With Tamron Hall - added fun-loving and chatty to her on-air-personality arsenal.
NEWS
July 12, 2006 | By Orville Lloyd Douglas
Chances are you've watched her, the dark-skinned black woman with the weave and the polished clothes. She may have a couple of master's degrees or a doctorate. It doesn't matter because when you see her on TV your immediate perception is to hate her. She's the woman that people laugh about in private, the one they call the "angry black bitch. " Are all black women really like this? Of course not. Yet television networks, which control the images presented to the public, perpetuate these stereotypes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2011
HA, HA, HA. I'm laughing and smiling so no one will think I'm one of those angry, mean, overly aggressive, emasculating black women. I've been known to be curt and impatient when stressed, but I'm not an eye-roller or a neck-swiveler even when highly provoked. I know black women who fit that stereotype and who readily admit as much, but even they were incensed by the Pepsi MAX commercial that aired during Sunday's Super Bowl. In that ad, Pepsi not only resurrected the angry black woman, but had her hurling a soda can. In case you missed it, here's the recap: A black woman tries to get her guy to eat better by kicking him, pushing his face in a pie and stuffing his mouth with soap.
NEWS
May 30, 2008
RE FATIMAH Ali's "Advice for the Sister": I'm not surprised that a column so quickly criticizing Michelle Obama was written by another black woman. One of the things I love about Ms. Obama is that she is herself. Most black women today are too insecure to be themselves. She obviously is a confident woman. She is brilliant and attractive. I hope and pray that she won't listen to other women and their "girlfriends" who think black women are inadequate and need "jaw reshaping" and probably weaves or extensions down her back to sling and toss to give her self-esteem.
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NEWS
April 3, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
RAE MARIE WARNER was something of an oddity back in 1970: a black female Philadelphia police officer. In fact, there is every indication that Rae was the first African-American woman hired as a Philadelphia cop. The Police Department put her in the Juvenile Aid Division, as it did with all female police officers in those days. It didn't want them out on patrol. That policy has long been changed, and women today patrol the city streets along with the men. Rae Warner might have been one of the pioneers who helped bring about the change.
NEWS
August 31, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The worn, leather-bound diaries, each about the size of a smartphone, reveal a voice rarely found in print. In them, Emilie Davis, a young housekeeper and seamstress, chronicles her life as a free black woman in Philadelphia during the Civil War. "To day has bin a memorable day and i thank god i have bin sperd to see it," Davis wrote in an entry dated Jan. 1, 1863, the day the Emancipation Proclamation became official. It is the first sentence in a series that fills three pocket diaries, recounting Davis' life from 1863 to 1865.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
She surprised people. She was tall, more than six feet. Her voice - sonorous, precise, pleased at its own beauty - surprised, too, almost as much as the words it spoke. Poet, memoirist, and public voice Maya Angelou, who died Wednesday at age 86 at her home in Winston-Salem, N.C., made a life of escaping expectations. "She lived an epic life," said poet and publisher Lamont B. Steptoe, "and her success was well-deserved for what she went through. " At a news conference Wednesday, Mayor Nutter said, "I've been a fan and admirer of hers for a long, long time . . . . She spoke to so many different people through poems.
NEWS
May 5, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Pennsylvania's top two Democrats called Saturday on state Treasurer Rob McCord to pull the racially charged attack ad he is airing against front-runner Tom Wolf in the gubernatorial primary. Former Gov. Ed Rendell said the television spot was "one of the worst I have ever seen," adding that it was a style of politics "that makes me ashamed to have been part of this business for most of my adult life. " McCord, in an emotional news conference, later said he would continue to use the ad, calling it a "teachable moment" about the moral need to confront racism.
NEWS
May 5, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - Tamron Hall made history early this year when she became the first black woman to coanchor Today 's news hours, joining Natalie Morales, Willie Geist, and Al Roker on the morning show's plush orange sofas. In an instant, the Temple University graduate - who is serious and to-the-point on MSNBC's NewsNation , and a compassionate listener on Investigation Discovery's Deadline Crime With Tamron Hall - added fun-loving and chatty to her on-air-personality arsenal.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
IN A RECENT "Saturday Night Live" sketch, host Kerry Washington mocked the show's lack of an African-American female performer by having to play Michele Obama and Oprah and Beyonce , running on and off stage to change dresses and wigs. Well . . . Keenan Thompson may not have to play Whoopi Goldberg anymore, either. According to the Hollywood Reporter , SNL recently held two showcase auditions consisting entirely of African-American women. The goal: Get someone into the cast in January.
NEWS
July 16, 2013
USUALLY, I'm with Stu Bykofsky 100 percent, because he is always firmly rooted in the real world. So, when he stepped off into la la land I was completely floored. In la la land, where you reside, Stu, you can con yourself into believing that you can raise a young black man just like you raise a young white man. But - news flash - he, as a young black male, will have to face a real world where there are going to be more than a few white folks who are not going to hesitate to let him know that he is indeed not a young white man. When he comes home with questions about why stop-and-frisk affects only him and not his little white friends, what are Angela and her husband going to tell him?
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Suzanne Gamboa, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama and congressional leaders unveiled a full-length statue of civil rights icon Rosa Parks in the Capitol Wednesday, paying tribute to a figure whose name became synonymous with courage in the face of injustice. Parks becomes the first black woman to be honored with a full-length statue in the Capitol's Statuary Hall. A bust of another black woman, abolitionist Sojourner Truth, sits in the Capitol Visitors Center. Obama said that with the installation of the statue, Parks, who died in 2005, has taken her rightful place among those who have shaped the course of U.S. history.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
Cardiss Collins, 81, an Illinois Democrat who reluctantly filled her late husband's seat in Congress in 1973 and over the next quarter-century became one of the most prominent black women on Capitol Hill, died Feb. 3 at Inova Alexandria Hospital in Alexandria, Va. A family friend, Mel Blackwell, said she had complications from pneumonia. Mrs. Collins won a special election for the congressional seat six months after her husband, Rep. George Collins, died when a commercial jetliner on which he was a passenger crashed near Chicago's Midway Airport, killing more than 40 people.
NEWS
February 2, 2013 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
In the spring of 2007, I was named an Inquirer metro columnist. As flattered as I was to land such a premier reporting position, I honestly wasn't sure I was up to the task. Writing about life in the big city felt too heavy and daunting, especially for a former sports and features writer who had spent the bulk of her career in the toy department. I realize now that the chance to champion ordinary folks and write about the issues affecting all of us was the most extraordinary opportunity I would ever have.
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