CollectionsBlackbeard
IN THE NEWS

Blackbeard

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2009 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
These pirates don't wear mascara! Indeed, one only has to look at the covers of Dynamite's outstanding new series, "Blackbeard: Legend of the Pyrate King," to realize this is a brutal, realistic tale that couldn't stand in starker contrast to "Pirates of the Caribbean" - the only successful pirate-themed entertainment vehicle in recent memory. Johnny Depp's Captain Jack Sparrow stood out in the cartoonish, campy "Pirates" films with traits highlighted by his clownish nature and affinity for eyeliner.
NEWS
July 8, 1992 | By Robert F. O'Neill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Marcus Hook Borough has been celebrating the 100th anniversary of its incorporation, and guess who has been left off the invitation list? None other than Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard the Pirate, a renegade sea captain who used the tiny Delaware River port as a haven and watering hole between his forays in the early 18th century. Accounts of Teach's carousings along Discord Lane (now Second Street) in the Hook have long been a part of local lore. Even though history describes him as "brutal, bloodthirsty and utterly depraved," Blackbeard has been romanticized by time, and residents are quick to point out the house along Market Street where he frequently visited a woman known only as Margaret.
NEWS
April 15, 1997 | By Michael Walzer
All history is revisionist. We regularly rediscover the past, see things from a different perspective, find new ways to compare ourselves with distant ancestors. Consider the early 18th-century pirates - Blackbeard and friends - as they have been rediscovered by colonial historians and nautical archaeologists. The pirates are still what they always were: freebooters and seafaring adventurers who plundered the merchant ships that crisscrossed the Caribbean and the western Atlantic.
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
It's pretty tough to keep a good town down. Take Marcus Hook, for example. It has been bombarded by the British, pillaged by pirates and invaded by Warlock bikers, and it still bounces back stronger than ever. Joke all you want about the Hook and its aromatic refineries - and many Philadelphians do - it doesn't upset the locals. They love the town the way parents love a baby, because it is their own. Life there, like the river it bounds, just goes on. And now Marcus Hook is planning a centennial celebration, 100 years of progress - and jokes - since it split from Lower Chichester in 1892.
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
As blasts from cannons filled the air, dozens of 18th-century reenactors swarmed Marcus Hook on Saturday, harking back to an era when the Delaware River community was a haven for plundering pirates, including the notorious Blackbeard. Hundreds turned out under sunny skies for the sixth annual Pirate Festival, a daylong waterfront event to raise money to preserve the Marcus Hook Plank House, a 1700s property that, according to legend, belonged to one of Blackbeard's mistresses, Margaret.
NEWS
March 23, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Looking for something to do Friday night? If you like Pirates, then this is for you. A documentary, Treasure: The Story of Marcus Hook , will be holding a free special preview screening at 7 p.m. in the Marcus Hook Community Center. The film chronicles the efforts of the Delaware County Borough of Marcus Hook to change it image - and future - by highlighting it's history. Pirate history to be exact. Arrr Matey, What say ye? The struggling Delaware River community of 2,400 residents, is sandwiched between two dying refineries.
NEWS
May 30, 1993 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Patricia Ann Miller wrote a book about "The Hook," to which local residents may at least give a look. That's because Marcus Hook, Pennsylvania: A Pictorial History, compiled and released last year in time for the borough's centennial celebration, is more visual than literary. The book was on sale yesterday at Marcus Hook's annual Memorial Day Parade. "They really don't read here in Marcus Hook. It's very blue collar," Miller said, as she sat on a park bench across the street from the borough library.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Who is Nicholas Brody? Is the antihero at the heart of Showtime's espionage thriller Homeland an American hero or an Islamist terrorist? Portrayed by British thesp Damian Lewis ( Life , The Forsyte Saga ) with a reserved intensity that can be disquieting to watch, Brody was a U.S. Marine sergeant held prisoner for eight years by al-Qaeda who came home in the pilot episode a hero. In Season 1, we found the military man had converted to Islam - and the Islamist cause - while in captivity.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2008 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
In an industry dominated by superhero titles, Zenescope continues to make a name for itself by offering quality titles different from anything else on the shelves. First, they turned "Grimm Fairy Tales" into a successful, "Law and Order"-esque franchise. Next, they breathed new life into the undead genre with "The Living Corpse. " Now, with the launch of "1001 Arabian Nights: The Adventures of Sinbad," the Fort Washington-based company has again produced a quality title for those looking for a fresh take on an old genre and a unique read.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2011
ONE OF the first things you notice when you enter Pat Croce's Villanova home is the pirate memorabilia. Sure, there are some mementos from his days as owner of the Sixers and there is evidence of his fascination with the late Harry Houdini. But the skull and crossbones motif is everywhere. On the walls, pillows, his desk - even in his mouth, where a molar is tattooed with a tiny skull wrapped in a red bandanna. On the stairs leading to his spacious home office, each step is decorated with tiny skulls and crossbones.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
As blasts from cannons filled the air, dozens of 18th-century reenactors swarmed Marcus Hook on Saturday, harking back to an era when the Delaware River community was a haven for plundering pirates, including the notorious Blackbeard. Hundreds turned out under sunny skies for the sixth annual Pirate Festival, a daylong waterfront event to raise money to preserve the Marcus Hook Plank House, a 1700s property that, according to legend, belonged to one of Blackbeard's mistresses, Margaret.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Who is Nicholas Brody? Is the antihero at the heart of Showtime's espionage thriller Homeland an American hero or an Islamist terrorist? Portrayed by British thesp Damian Lewis ( Life , The Forsyte Saga ) with a reserved intensity that can be disquieting to watch, Brody was a U.S. Marine sergeant held prisoner for eight years by al-Qaeda who came home in the pilot episode a hero. In Season 1, we found the military man had converted to Islam - and the Islamist cause - while in captivity.
NEWS
March 23, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Looking for something to do Friday night? If you like Pirates, then this is for you. A documentary, Treasure: The Story of Marcus Hook , will be holding a free special preview screening at 7 p.m. in the Marcus Hook Community Center. The film chronicles the efforts of the Delaware County Borough of Marcus Hook to change it image - and future - by highlighting it's history. Pirate history to be exact. Arrr Matey, What say ye? The struggling Delaware River community of 2,400 residents, is sandwiched between two dying refineries.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2011
ONE OF the first things you notice when you enter Pat Croce's Villanova home is the pirate memorabilia. Sure, there are some mementos from his days as owner of the Sixers and there is evidence of his fascination with the late Harry Houdini. But the skull and crossbones motif is everywhere. On the walls, pillows, his desk - even in his mouth, where a molar is tattooed with a tiny skull wrapped in a red bandanna. On the stairs leading to his spacious home office, each step is decorated with tiny skulls and crossbones.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2009 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
These pirates don't wear mascara! Indeed, one only has to look at the covers of Dynamite's outstanding new series, "Blackbeard: Legend of the Pyrate King," to realize this is a brutal, realistic tale that couldn't stand in starker contrast to "Pirates of the Caribbean" - the only successful pirate-themed entertainment vehicle in recent memory. Johnny Depp's Captain Jack Sparrow stood out in the cartoonish, campy "Pirates" films with traits highlighted by his clownish nature and affinity for eyeliner.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2008 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
In an industry dominated by superhero titles, Zenescope continues to make a name for itself by offering quality titles different from anything else on the shelves. First, they turned "Grimm Fairy Tales" into a successful, "Law and Order"-esque franchise. Next, they breathed new life into the undead genre with "The Living Corpse. " Now, with the launch of "1001 Arabian Nights: The Adventures of Sinbad," the Fort Washington-based company has again produced a quality title for those looking for a fresh take on an old genre and a unique read.
NEWS
July 11, 2006 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The most successful pirates, from Blackbeard and Jean Lafitte to Jack Sparrow, have always employed the element of surprise, sneaking up on their prey. When Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest, with Johnny Depp reprising his role as the deliciously dissolute Sparrow, raked in more than $135.6 million this weekend, that was far more plunder than anyone expected. The pirates' bounty brightened the mood in Hollywood, boosting its recovery from last summer's box office doldrums.
NEWS
February 7, 2002 | By Will Van Sant INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
No island is a man, but, as with men, isolation sometimes breeds a wild and coarse character. Take Petty's Island, 292 acres in the Delaware River, separated from Camden and Pennsauken by roughly 1,200 feet of water. The island's history is one of dueling and gambling. It has been a graveyard for ships and destination for floaters - corpses that turn up in the water, often in spring, when decomposition produces gases that lift them to the surface. The surviving lore is colorful.
NEWS
June 7, 1998 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As we pulled into Hyannis' Ocean Street Docks, we could see the flag-waving masts of the pirate ship bobbing on the shimmering water. Standing next to the small boat were about a dozen pint-sized pirates, wearing paper hats and painted scars, eager to set sail for the open seas. The 1 1/2-hour cruise promised lots of swashbuckling fun, with costumed pirates, water cannons to ward off an enemy frigate, even a sunken treasure. We were all set to start yo-ho-ho-ing when the ship's captain told me he had given away our places because we were five minutes late.
NEWS
November 21, 1997 | By Jeff Gammage, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Divers here have pulled barnacle-encrusted cannons and pewter dinner plates from the sandy offshore shallows, a bounty wrested from what they say was Blackbeard's pirate ship. To the people of this coastal boating village, the relics might as well be gold. Mayor Hunter Chadwick foresees new motels and restaurants jammed with wide-eyed tourists, eager to see the belongings of the seas' most notorious pirate. They would be whisked here on a four-lane highway connecting this isolated landing with the inland capital of Raleigh.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|