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Bladder Cancer

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NEWS
October 13, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
DOCTORS WITH AIDS Would you let a doctor who has AIDS treat you? When 2,000 people nationwide were asked that question by University of California at San Francisco researchers, 85 percent said they would switch doctors if theirs had the disease. The same 85 percent thought it likely that the disease can be spread from doctor to patient - which the researchers pooh-poohed, saying it's never been known to happen. And 45 percent said doctors who have AIDS shouldn't be allowed to practice.
NEWS
February 4, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
In a setback to the food and cosmetic industries, the government will not appeal to the Supreme Court a ruling that food and cosmetics with traces of carcinogens must be kept off the market, federal officials said yesterday. Ruling in a case involving food and cosmetic dyes known to cause cancer in animals, the Food and Drug Administration refused last year to ban the dyes, arguing that the cancer risk was so small as to be legally insignificant. But a federal appeals court threw out the FDA ruling in October, concluding that a 1958 law known as the Delaney Clause, after its principal author, required the agency to ban any food additive known to cause cancer in humans or animals.
NEWS
June 5, 2004 | By Frederick Cusick and Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Joe Niagara, 76, known as the Rockin' Bird and one of the great Philadelphia disc jockeys from the golden age of rock and roll, died of heart failure yesterday following cancer surgery at Bryn Mawr Hospital. He had been fighting bladder cancer for the last few years. His wife, Evelyn, said he died about 3:30 a.m. Mike Bowe announced the death yesterday afternoon on WPEN-AM (950), Mr. Niagara's last station. "When people mention the great disc jockeys of Philadelphia, they always mention Joe Niagara, Hy Lit and Jerry Blavat," said Clark DeLeon, a former Inquirer columnist who is writing a biography of Lit. "Niagara transcended being a normal disc jockey.
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Huizhong Wu, Inquirer Staff Writer
Milton Alexander Wohl had a message for those attending his funeral. Don't smoke. He had specifically requested that the rabbi say "Don't smoke" during the service. And the rabbi agreed. "People were kind of shocked," Joan Wohl, Dr. Wohl's wife of 63 years, said. "But that was how strongly he felt. " Dr. Wohl, 90, of Center City, died Monday, April 20, after a battle with bladder cancer at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. He had been a smoker and wanted people to know that smoking is directly related to bladder cancer.
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | By Brielle Urciuoli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph M. Prota took the initiative once a year to round up clothes and boots that he and his coworkers at the Delaware River Port Authority no longer used and give them to the homeless people who often camped out under the Walt Whitman Bridge. Almost every day, especially during the colder months, he would also bring them food, such as soup, chocolate, coffee, and hot chocolate. "We're going to keep that tradition up in honor of Joe," a colleague, Frank Natanni, said Tuesday. "He was an all-around great guy Mr. Prota, 59, of Williamstown, died Thursday, Sept.
NEWS
May 15, 1997 | Daily News wire services
Study is critical of medical marijuana Smoking marijuana has less medical benefit than taking the drug's active ingredient in its pure form, and neither is of much use when side effects are considered, a new study says. The active ingredient in marijuana, THC, has been shown to be medicinally useful for such things as fighting nausea after chemotherapy and restoring appetite in AIDS patients, said the study published yesterday in the Annals of Internal Medicine. But THC is more effective when taken in its pure form, the prescription drug dronabinol, than when smoked, according to Dr. Eric A. Voth and Dr. Richard H. Schwartz, whose conclusions came from analyzing earlier studies.
NEWS
December 9, 1999 | By Carrie Budoff, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The cancer rate in the township's East Riverton section, sandwiched between an industrial park and a federal Superfund site, is no different from what is expected statewide, according to a state study released yesterday. Epidemiologists from the Department of Health and Senior Services came to that conclusion after a yearlong analysis of surveys completed by residents of 276 homes in the neighborhood. State and local officials began studying East Riverton last December after longtime resident Dorothy Waxwood determined that 65 of the 102 homes in a three-block radius had residents who either had died of cancer or were battling the disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2011 | By Howard Gensler
ACCORDING TO TMZ.com, Justin Bieber has agreed to a cheek swab when he returns to the U.S. to prove that he is not the father of Mariah Yeater 's baby. Or Mariah Carey 's babies. TMZ sources say Justin's attorney, Howard Weitzman , contacted Yeater's attorneys to confirm that Justin will take the test. They've already chosen a lab to administer the test. Justin is so confident he's not the daddy - and he probably hasn't slept with so many women that he'd already be forgetting them - that once he's cleared he plans to sue Yeater to send a message to others who seek to profit off claims of future Bieber babies.
NEWS
May 15, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Delran woman admitted Monday that she faked bladder cancer two years ago and collected donations from supporters. Lori E. Stilley, 41, who was arrested in September, pleaded guilty to theft by deception in Superior Court in Burlington County. Family members and supporters raised more than $12,000 after she announced she had cancer in February 2011. Supporters helped prepare meals and planned Stilley's wedding in nine days, covering the cost. But people grew suspicious when Stilley postponed her hospice care after announcing on Facebook in November 2011 that a "miracle" was coming.
NEWS
February 16, 1986
Richard J. Hickey (Op-ed Page, Jan. 31) challenges whether cigarette smoking causes lung cancer. His major point is temporal ambiguity: Given concomitant events, it is difficult to discern cause from effect. Hence, Mr. Hickey argues, persons predisposed to lung cancer may crave cigarettes (nicotine). One way to discern cause from effect is to order the two events in time, presuming that causes precede effects. Following 19-century Victorianism, men began smoking in record numbers.
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NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Huizhong Wu, Inquirer Staff Writer
Milton Alexander Wohl had a message for those attending his funeral. Don't smoke. He had specifically requested that the rabbi say "Don't smoke" during the service. And the rabbi agreed. "People were kind of shocked," Joan Wohl, Dr. Wohl's wife of 63 years, said. "But that was how strongly he felt. " Dr. Wohl, 90, of Center City, died Monday, April 20, after a battle with bladder cancer at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. He had been a smoker and wanted people to know that smoking is directly related to bladder cancer.
NEWS
September 28, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Memorial services are set for Saturday, Oct. 18, for John R. Hild Sr., 71, a retired Philadelphia fire captain and safety administrator, who died Tuesday, Aug. 12, of bladder cancer at a hospice in Lecanto, Fla. A longtime resident of Southwest Philadelphia, Mr. Hild had retired to Crystal River, Fla., in 2003. Born in Philadelphia, he graduated in 1961 from John Bartram High School, where he played baseball. After high school, Mr. Hild enlisted in the Marine Corps and served eight years as an active reservist.
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | By Brielle Urciuoli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph M. Prota took the initiative once a year to round up clothes and boots that he and his coworkers at the Delaware River Port Authority no longer used and give them to the homeless people who often camped out under the Walt Whitman Bridge. Almost every day, especially during the colder months, he would also bring them food, such as soup, chocolate, coffee, and hot chocolate. "We're going to keep that tradition up in honor of Joe," a colleague, Frank Natanni, said Tuesday. "He was an all-around great guy Mr. Prota, 59, of Williamstown, died Thursday, Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oscar noms thrill stars The film industry is buzzing about the Oscar nominations. It was like 5:30 a.m. in Malibu, Calif., when Matthew McConaughey , wife Camila , and infant son Livingston heard that Matthew got a best-actor nod for Dallas Buyers Club . "We're having a really good alarm clock with the news," he told USA Today. David O. Russell 's American Hustle picked up 10, including acting noms for Jennifer Lawrence , Christian Bale , Bradley Cooper , and Amy Adams . "It's like I'm still in the experience.
NEWS
May 15, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Delran woman admitted Monday that she faked bladder cancer two years ago and collected donations from supporters. Lori E. Stilley, 41, who was arrested in September, pleaded guilty to theft by deception in Superior Court in Burlington County. Family members and supporters raised more than $12,000 after she announced she had cancer in February 2011. Supporters helped prepare meals and planned Stilley's wedding in nine days, covering the cost. But people grew suspicious when Stilley postponed her hospice care after announcing on Facebook in November 2011 that a "miracle" was coming.
SPORTS
April 26, 2013
The USGA said Thursday it has received a record number of entries for the U.S. Open Championship June 13-16 at Merion Golf Club in Ardmore. The 9,860 entrants top the previous mark of 9,086 for the 2009 championship at Bethpage State Park's Black Course in Farmingdale, N.Y. Among the record total are 52 players, including 11 past champions, who are exempt from qualifying. COLLEGES: Eddie Jordan has signed his first recruit at Rutgers. The new coach announced Thursday that guard-forward Craig Brown has signed a letter of intent to play for the Scarlet Knights.
SPORTS
November 28, 2012 | Daily News Wire Reports
THE FAMILY of former NFL coach Jack Pardee says the NFL defensive great has been diagnosed with gall bladder cancer and has 6 to 9 months to live. Daughter Anne Pardee confirmed to the Associated Press on Tuesday that the cancer has spread to other organs and that her 77-year-old father plans to move to a Denver hospice. The College Football Hall of Fame inductee's wife, Phyllis, has been receiving care at the same center since having a stroke. Anne Pardee said her father was in good spirits despite the diagnosis.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lori E. Stilley told friends last year that she had Stage IV bladder cancer and was preparing to die. Supporters raised more than $12,000 for expenses and prepared her meals. Her "Team Lori Rocks" page on Facebook attracted more than 300 friends. Family members and others helped cover the cost for her to get married. It was the least they could do. But no one accompanied the Delran resident to see a doctor, an acquaintance now recalls. Or viewed lab reports or medical bills around her home.
NEWS
September 22, 2012
NEW YORK - Dorothy Carter, 94, a former stage actress who starred in the adaptation of the groundbreaking novel Strange Fruit on Broadway and later became an educator and a children's book author, has died after battling bladder cancer. She died Sept. 14 in New York, family friend Mary Zaslofsky said Friday. Ms. Carter, born in 1918 in Kissimee, Fla., studied drama at Spelman College and later was taught by Stella Adler in New York. She made her Broadway debut in 1945 in Lillian Smith's adaptation of her novel Strange Fruit , an interracial love story.
SPORTS
July 24, 2012
In a stirring ceremony in Cooperstown, N.Y., former Reds shortstop Barry Larkin and the late Ron Santo, a standout third baseman for the Cubs and later a beloved broadcaster for the team, were inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Larkin, who played his entire 19-year career with Cincinnati, retired after the 2004 season with a .295 career average, 2,340 hits, 1,329 runs scored, and 379 stolen bases. After wiping away tears as his teenage daughter sang the national anthem, Larkin thanked the people who helped him along his journey, none more important than his mother, Shirley, and father, Robert, who were seated in the first row. "If we were going to do something, we were going to do it right," Larkin said.
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