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Blake Robbins

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NEWS
January 12, 2012 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of Lower Merion's unforgettable families has a message: Forget about us. "We're done," Michael Robbins said Wednesday. Robbins spoke minutes after his daughter Paige, 20, dropped her invasion-of-privacy lawsuit against the Lower Merion School District, the same district that last year paid his son Blake $175,000 to resolve allegations that it had spied on him through a school-issued laptop. But like Blake Robbins' case, which drew an international spotlight to the district and stirred finger-pointing and contempt from parents and officials inside it, this one didn't end without a dose of theater.
NEWS
March 3, 2010 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Many of the Lower Merion district high school parents who met last night to figure out how to respond to a lawsuit over alleged laptop spying agreed they want a say in the process. About 150 people gathered at Narberth Borough Hall to discuss whether they could and should join together to influence the litigation and oppose its becoming a class action. Bryn Mawr resident Michael Boni, a group founder and a lawyer, said that unless a way was found to resolve the laptop lawsuit without lengthy legal proceedings, the cost to the district could run "into the millions.
NEWS
February 25, 2010 | By WILLIAM BENDER, benderw@phillynews.com 215-854-5255
Lynn Matsko wouldn't answer reporters' questions yesterday, but the look on her face said it all. She's had enough. Matsko, the Harriton High assistant vice principal at the center of the Lower Merion School District webcam scandal, choked back tears twice as she rebutted the "unjust and inaccurate" rumor that she had "spied" on a student through the camera embedded in his school-issued laptop. "I find the allegations and implications that I have, or ever would, engage in such conduct to be offensive, abhorrent and outrageous," said Matsko, the mother of two teenaged boys.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By John P. Martin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Lower Merion School District has agreed to pay $10,000 to a teen secretly recorded by his school-issued laptop, the fourth settlement with a student since the webcam scandal broke last year. The school board approved the payout at its meeting Monday night, spokesman Doug Young said. Lower Merion paid more than $1.6 million last year to litigate and settle allegations that it spied on students through webcams on the laptops it gave to each of its nearly 2,300 high school students.
NEWS
January 11, 2012 | By John P. Martin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of Lower Merion's unforgettable families has a message: Forget about us. "We're done," Michael Robbins said Wednesday. Robbins spoke minutes after his 20-year-old daughter Paige dropped her invasion-of-privacy lawsuit against the Lower Merion School District, the same district that last year paid his son Blake $175,000 to resolve allegations it spied on him through a school-issued laptop. But like Blake Robbins' case, which drew an international spotlight to the school district and stirred finger-pointing and contempt from parents and officials inside it, this one didn't end without a dose of theater.
NEWS
December 8, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The sister of the student who brought the first webcam lawsuit against the Lower Merion School District two year ago now has filed her own federal lawsuit, which administrators have slammed as "an attempted money-grab and a complete waste of tax dollars. " Paige Robbins, 19, of Penn Valley, alleges that the district invaded her privacy when it remotely snapped pictures via a laptop in her home while she was undressed. She is the sister of Blake Robbins, 17, who as a sophomore at Harriton High School sued the Lower Merion district for invasion of privacy and agreed to a $175,000 settlement.
NEWS
December 9, 2011
PHILADELPHIA Bouncer bill gets OK Bouncers will be required to receive proper training and register with the city before they may begin working at local clubs and bars, thanks to a bill approved yesterday by City Council. Council voted unanimously to pass the bill, which Councilman Bill Greenlee sponsored after he was inspired by horrifying stories about reckless bouncers in a May Daily News story. Mayor Nutter is expected to sign the bill. Change in lead-paint bill City Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown made some changes yesterday to a bill that would require landlords to have a certified technician conduct a dust-wipe test when property built before 1978 is turned over to a new tenant, to prevent lead-based paint exposure.
NEWS
December 29, 2011 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Lower Merion School District has resolved another lawsuit with a former student over its secret monitoring of student laptops. The district reached a settlement last week with Joshua Levin, a 2009 graduate of Harriton High School. In a lawsuit filed in June in federal court, Levin contended the district violated his civil rights by capturing nearly 8,000 webcam photos and screen shots from his school-issued laptop between September 2008 and March 2009. Levin's lawyer said Wednesday the settlement proposal was larger than the $10,000 payments offered to other affected students but he would not discuss details.
NEWS
June 9, 2011 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eight months after the Lower Merion School District thought it had settled the furor over secret monitoring of its students' laptops, the district faces a new legal battle on the issue. On Monday, a 2009 graduate of Harriton High School sued the district, saying it violated his civil rights by capturing nearly 8,000 webcam photos and screen shots from his laptop between September 2008 and March 2009. The plaintiff, Joshua Levin, contends he was "shocked, humiliated, and severely emotionally distressed" after viewing the images last summer.
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NEWS
January 12, 2012 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of Lower Merion's unforgettable families has a message: Forget about us. "We're done," Michael Robbins said Wednesday. Robbins spoke minutes after his daughter Paige, 20, dropped her invasion-of-privacy lawsuit against the Lower Merion School District, the same district that last year paid his son Blake $175,000 to resolve allegations that it had spied on him through a school-issued laptop. But like Blake Robbins' case, which drew an international spotlight to the district and stirred finger-pointing and contempt from parents and officials inside it, this one didn't end without a dose of theater.
NEWS
January 11, 2012 | By John P. Martin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of Lower Merion's unforgettable families has a message: Forget about us. "We're done," Michael Robbins said Wednesday. Robbins spoke minutes after his 20-year-old daughter Paige dropped her invasion-of-privacy lawsuit against the Lower Merion School District, the same district that last year paid his son Blake $175,000 to resolve allegations it spied on him through a school-issued laptop. But like Blake Robbins' case, which drew an international spotlight to the school district and stirred finger-pointing and contempt from parents and officials inside it, this one didn't end without a dose of theater.
NEWS
December 29, 2011 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Lower Merion School District has resolved another lawsuit with a former student over its secret monitoring of student laptops. The district reached a settlement last week with Joshua Levin, a 2009 graduate of Harriton High School. In a lawsuit filed in June in federal court, Levin contended the district violated his civil rights by capturing nearly 8,000 webcam photos and screen shots from his school-issued laptop between September 2008 and March 2009. Levin's lawyer said Wednesday the settlement proposal was larger than the $10,000 payments offered to other affected students but he would not discuss details.
NEWS
December 9, 2011
PHILADELPHIA Bouncer bill gets OK Bouncers will be required to receive proper training and register with the city before they may begin working at local clubs and bars, thanks to a bill approved yesterday by City Council. Council voted unanimously to pass the bill, which Councilman Bill Greenlee sponsored after he was inspired by horrifying stories about reckless bouncers in a May Daily News story. Mayor Nutter is expected to sign the bill. Change in lead-paint bill City Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown made some changes yesterday to a bill that would require landlords to have a certified technician conduct a dust-wipe test when property built before 1978 is turned over to a new tenant, to prevent lead-based paint exposure.
NEWS
December 9, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sister of the student who brought the first webcam lawsuit against the Lower Merion School District two years ago has filed her own federal lawsuit, which administrators have slammed as "an attempted money-grab and a complete waste of tax dollars. " Paige Robbins, 19, of Penn Valley, alleges the district invaded her privacy when it remotely snapped pictures via a laptop in her home while she was undressed. She is the sister of Blake Robbins, 17, who as a sophomore at Harriton High School sued the Lower Merion district for invasion of privacy and agreed to a $175,000 settlement.
NEWS
August 24, 2011 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Lower Merion School District has agreed to pay $10,000 to a teen secretly recorded by his school-issued laptop, the fourth settlement with a student since the webcam scandal broke last year. The school board approved the payout at its meeting Monday night, spokesman Doug Young said. The district did not identify the student. Lower Merion paid more than $1.6 million last year to litigate and settle allegations that it spied on students through webcams on the laptops it gave to each of its nearly 2,300 high school students.
NEWS
June 9, 2011 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eight months after the Lower Merion School District thought it had settled the furor over secret monitoring of its students' laptops, the district faces a new legal battle on the issue. On Monday, a 2009 graduate of Harriton High School sued the district, saying it violated his civil rights by capturing nearly 8,000 webcam photos and screen shots from his laptop between September 2008 and March 2009. The plaintiff, Joshua Levin, contends he was "shocked, humiliated, and severely emotionally distressed" after viewing the images last summer.
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