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Blasphemy

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NEWS
March 20, 2008
RE THE March 6 "Holy Trinity" back page: Shame, shame, shame! I'm saddened and disappointed that you elected to defile the most holy and blessed trinity with this "sardonic" reference at any time, but especially now, the holiest and most sacred time on the Christian calendar. Facetious is one thing, satire, too. Sarcasm has its place. But blasphemy has NO place, except in the infernal regions - the bowels of Hades. I shall pray for you. M.A. Vare, Philadelphia
NEWS
October 2, 2012
By Jonathan Zimmerman In 2007, George Kalman received notice that he had violated a law against blasphemy. But Kalman wasn't in Pakistan, Egypt, or any of the other Middle Eastern countries that have burst into violence over an anti-Muslim YouTube video. No, Kalman was right here in Pennsylvania. After filling out a form to register his new film company as "I Choose Hell Productions L.L.C.," the Downingtown resident got a letter informing him that his request was rejected under a state law barring "blasphemy, profane cursing, or swearing" in corporate names.
NEWS
March 8, 1989 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
Move over Salman Rushdie, song siren Madonna may quickly replace you at the top of the blasphemy list. There's a great noise being made in the music world surrounding a video by the blond pop star who's making it rich while singing such songs as "Papa Don't Preach," "I'm a Material Girl," and her latest effort, "Like a Prayer. " Madonna's video, along with a Pepsi ad, are the subject of much controversy because an Italian Christian group has labeled the video "blasphemous.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
It's about time. After a week of anti-American violence in the Muslim world over a video that offends Islam, President Obama finally made a rousing defense of free speech, even if it insults religion. Following the outburst of outrage in Libya and Egypt, American officials repeatedly deplored the video. There should have been more U.S. outrage over a campaign of violence orchestrated by Islamists and abetted by some Muslim leaders. In his annual address to the U.N. General Assembly on Tuesday, Obama went a good ways toward setting the record straight.
NEWS
January 18, 2004
By sometime around 10 tonight, we'll know. Know whether to say Houston! as a cry of triumph, or an anguished curse. Know whether the play now known as Fourth and Forever will be recalled as the pivot of a season to treasure, or a pleasant footnote in yet another grim tale. Know whether the next two weeks will be a crescendo of sweet expectation, or a grim coda. Whether Philadelphia and its beloved Eagles will bask in the hype that America lavishes on its favorite sporting event, or try glumly to ignore it. You'll see no predictions here about what will befall the Birds tonight at Lincoln Financial Field.
NEWS
January 2, 2004
RE: M. ANTHONY Vare's letter "It's blasphemy Signe" (Dec. 17): In his letter Vare mentions "her" twice. Being a longtime reader of the Daily News, I always thought Signe was a guy. The Daily News has never really made it clear to its readers by way of a photograph exactly what Signe looks like. So Signe is not a guy editorial cartoonist. To be perfectly honest with you, "That's news to me!" Wayne E. Williams Camden
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1992 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Imagine a Hollywood teen-rebel drama like East of Eden intruding on the New Delhi soundstage of an Indian movie musical, and you can almost guess the alternately moody, farcical and exuberant personalities of Masala. Written, directed by and starring Temple University grad Srinivas Krishna, the frantically entertaining film, set in Toronto, focuses on a recovered junkie, Krishna (played by the filmmaker) - a first-generation American cut off from the members of his immediate family, who have died in a plane crash.
NEWS
October 9, 2012
The message to religious zealots Jonathan Zimmerman's essay "America's war on blasphemy" (Oct. 2) should remind us that our message to religious zealots should not be, "Please, be more tolerant of our blasphemy," but rather, "Your religious rules don't apply to us. " We have no obligation to follow another religion's rules on food, hats, or deity drawings. Blasphemy is defined by the believer. Thus, for nonbelievers, there is no such thing as blasphemy. Most people of the industrial nations understand that nonbelievers are free to not believe.
NEWS
August 1, 1989 | BY CAL THOMAS
Remember the 1984 Democratic National Convention in San Francisco? The hall looked like the flag factory George Bush visited during the 1988 campaign. San Francisco Democrats sought to visually trump the Republicans, whom they had accused of "wrapping themselves in the flag. " By golly, Democrats would show they could out-flag-wrap the Republicans. The hypocrisy of that ploy is now revealed by the stands of many Democrats against a constitutional amendment to protect the flag. these Democrats say such an amendment is "over-reacting," as if to suggest that flag burning is rational behavior.
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NEWS
October 9, 2012
The message to religious zealots Jonathan Zimmerman's essay "America's war on blasphemy" (Oct. 2) should remind us that our message to religious zealots should not be, "Please, be more tolerant of our blasphemy," but rather, "Your religious rules don't apply to us. " We have no obligation to follow another religion's rules on food, hats, or deity drawings. Blasphemy is defined by the believer. Thus, for nonbelievers, there is no such thing as blasphemy. Most people of the industrial nations understand that nonbelievers are free to not believe.
NEWS
October 2, 2012
By Jonathan Zimmerman In 2007, George Kalman received notice that he had violated a law against blasphemy. But Kalman wasn't in Pakistan, Egypt, or any of the other Middle Eastern countries that have burst into violence over an anti-Muslim YouTube video. No, Kalman was right here in Pennsylvania. After filling out a form to register his new film company as "I Choose Hell Productions L.L.C.," the Downingtown resident got a letter informing him that his request was rejected under a state law barring "blasphemy, profane cursing, or swearing" in corporate names.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
It's about time. After a week of anti-American violence in the Muslim world over a video that offends Islam, President Obama finally made a rousing defense of free speech, even if it insults religion. Following the outburst of outrage in Libya and Egypt, American officials repeatedly deplored the video. There should have been more U.S. outrage over a campaign of violence orchestrated by Islamists and abetted by some Muslim leaders. In his annual address to the U.N. General Assembly on Tuesday, Obama went a good ways toward setting the record straight.
NEWS
September 8, 2012 | By Rebecca Santana, Associated Press
ISLAMABAD - In a rare move, a Pakistani judge granted bail Friday to a young, mentally challenged Christian girl accused of insulting Islam by burning pages of the religion's holy book. Activists who had pressed for the girl's release welcomed the rare decision to grant bail in a blasphemy case. But defense lawyers expressed concern for her safety in a conservative country where blasphemy allegations often result in vigilante justice. The girl's plight has drawn new attention to Pakistan's harsh blasphemy laws, which critics claim are used to persecute minorities and settle personal vendettas.
NEWS
August 21, 2012 | By Rebecca Santana, Associated Press
ISLAMABAD - A Christian girl has been sent to a Pakistani prison after being accused by furious Muslim neighbors of burning pages of the Islamic holy book, the Quran, in violation of the country's strict blasphemy laws. A police official said Monday that there was little evidence pages of the book had been burned, and that the case would likely be dropped. But hundreds of angry neighbors gathered outside the girl's home last week demanding action in a case raising new concerns about religious extremism in this conservative Muslim country.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2011 | By Howard Gensler
A CONSERVATIVE religious leader is mad at an actress. Hollywood? No, Pakistan. That's where Veena Malik is under fire from Muslim cleric Mufti Abdul Qawi for appearing to cuddle with Indian actor Ashmit Patel on "Bigg Boss," the Indian version of "Big Brother. " Cuddling with an Indian in India? There are few worse sins in Pakistan. Imagine "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?" as holy war. Malik, however, isn't taking the criticism of her making out lying down.
NEWS
March 20, 2008
RE THE March 6 "Holy Trinity" back page: Shame, shame, shame! I'm saddened and disappointed that you elected to defile the most holy and blessed trinity with this "sardonic" reference at any time, but especially now, the holiest and most sacred time on the Christian calendar. Facetious is one thing, satire, too. Sarcasm has its place. But blasphemy has NO place, except in the infernal regions - the bowels of Hades. I shall pray for you. M.A. Vare, Philadelphia
NEWS
January 18, 2004
By sometime around 10 tonight, we'll know. Know whether to say Houston! as a cry of triumph, or an anguished curse. Know whether the play now known as Fourth and Forever will be recalled as the pivot of a season to treasure, or a pleasant footnote in yet another grim tale. Know whether the next two weeks will be a crescendo of sweet expectation, or a grim coda. Whether Philadelphia and its beloved Eagles will bask in the hype that America lavishes on its favorite sporting event, or try glumly to ignore it. You'll see no predictions here about what will befall the Birds tonight at Lincoln Financial Field.
NEWS
January 2, 2004
RE: M. ANTHONY Vare's letter "It's blasphemy Signe" (Dec. 17): In his letter Vare mentions "her" twice. Being a longtime reader of the Daily News, I always thought Signe was a guy. The Daily News has never really made it clear to its readers by way of a photograph exactly what Signe looks like. So Signe is not a guy editorial cartoonist. To be perfectly honest with you, "That's news to me!" Wayne E. Williams Camden
NEWS
December 16, 1999 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of Lebanon's most beloved singers, Marcel Khalifa, was acquitted yesterday of blasphemy in a trial that many Lebanese regarded as a test case of their nation's position as a cultural oasis in a conservative Arab world. The top court in Beirut said that Khalifa had not intended to demean the Islamic religion in a ballad based on the biblical story of Joseph. The lyrics to the song include a short verse from the Koran, which Lebanon's Sunni Muslim authorities said defied a prohibition against setting the Koran to music.
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