CollectionsBlimp
IN THE NEWS

Blimp

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 5, 1991 | E.W. FAIRCLOTH/DAILY NEWS
Airship Shamu, Sea World's seven-story killer whale blimp came to town yesterday to give a VIP tour to a Philadelphia Variety Club child, Stephen Cope, 8, from Reading, before proceeding to the skies over Veterans Stadium where the Philadelphia Eagles would take on the New York Giants. Here airship pilot Allan Judd chats with young Stephen before giving him a tour of the blimp's gondola.
NEWS
November 13, 1990 | By Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writer
All lit up and no place to go. Not that Philadelphia would go any place. But usually, when "Monday Night Football" comes to town, Center City likes to turn on the juice to show the blimp-bound football cameras there really is a Philadelphia beyond the Vet Stadium stands. Last night, with several newly topped skyscrapers making the city's skyline bigger and brighter than ever for the Eagles-Redskins clash, the lights were on. But the blimp was down. Blustery winds grounded the fickle craft, robbing TV viewers of the usual mood-of-the-city pictures that "Monday Night Football" likes to show between football plays.
NEWS
August 30, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. yesterday reversed its decision to let the government use one of the company's blimps to spy on drug smugglers along the Texas Gulf Coast, saying publicity had ruined chances for an effective test. The U.S. Customs Service had intended to borrow the Houston-based blimp for one week to determine whether the lighter-than-air ships could be used to detect drug runners. "With the widespread publicity about the project over the last two days, it would be difficult to get any meaningful reading on the ability of airships to contribute to the detection of drug smuggling operations," Thomas B. Riley, Goodyear's manager of airship operations, said in a statement.
NEWS
February 20, 2000 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
One the best shows in Las Vegas takes place each night when the gambling resorts' neon signs light up the night sky along the famous Strip. Now there's a new vantage point for getting a bird's-eye view of that nightly spectacle. Since last fall, a 165-foot blimp known as the Vegas.com airship has been carrying passengers, up to nine at a time, in the enclosed gondola that hangs beneath its helium-filled "envelope. " The blimp departs from North Las Vegas Airport and travels at about 20 m.p.h.
NEWS
October 12, 1995 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It seems some folks just have to have a target they can't miss. For the second time in two weeks, the red, white and blue blimp floating 30 feet above the new branch of the Keystone Savings & Loan Association in the Shoppes at Great Valley has had the air - or, rather, the helium - shot out of it. Two hundred cubic feet of helium, to be exact. "It shows no respect," said Barry DiLibero, owner of Aapex Sunrides, the hot-air balloon company in Chester Springs that owns the blimp, valued at $700.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2006 | By Thomas J. Brady INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When David Betzner wanted to diversify his mapmaking business, he decided to shoot for the sky. The result is Vertical View L.L.C., which takes aerial photographs from a small, unmanned blimp. The photos can be taken from as low as 12 feet, and offer high-resolution detail. Betzner said using an unmanned blimp was less expensive than using a helicopter. Yesterday, Vertical View sent its blimp aloft to take about 280 pictures of a planned condominium site at 1706 S. Rittenhouse Square St. Construction has not started, but the assignment was to take photographs at 29 elevations ranging from 56 to 360 feet to show prospective buyers of the condos views from each floor.
NEWS
October 20, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAKEHURST -- At 178 feet long and 56 feet high, the massive airship dwarfed members of the ground crew Thursday as they strained to hold on to tethering lines like so many Lilliputians trying to control Gulliver. Inside the gondola of the Navy's MZ-3A, pilots Mark Kynett and Larry Chambers made the final checks, and then - with two powerful engines roaring at their back - aimed the blimp at a sharp angle into the sky and took off from Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst. The ship's flight near historic Hangar 1 at the Naval Air Engineering Station conjured up images of Germany's ill-fated Hindenburg and its fiery destruction there 75 years earlier.
NEWS
February 19, 1988 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
This summer, the supercop that patrols the Jersey shore on the lookout for bad guys, or in this case, illegal ocean dumpers, could be a blimp. That is, if Assemblyman Anthony M. Villane Jr. (R., Monmouth County) and Assembly Speaker Chuck Hardwick (R., Union) get their way. Their bill establishing "eye in the sky" surveillance this summer to monitor the New York Bight and the New Jersey coast by airship passed the Assembly yesterday by a 72-1 vote. The bill now goes to the Senate.
NEWS
September 20, 2006 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a dream come true 80 years in the making for 87-year-old Valentine Seidle. For Betty Frey, 83, it was a desire to conquer childhood memories of the ill-fated Hindenburg's smoldering on the ground. And so yesterday they and four other seniors from two retirement communities in Philadelphia and Doylestown went to Atlantic City's Bader Field to board a gigantic white-and-blue blimp for a 30-minute ride above the casinos, Boardwalk and coastline. The ride on Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey's airship - one of only 20 such blimps in the world, Horizon said - was a wish granted by Horizon and the Twilight Wish Foundation.
NEWS
July 19, 2003 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kate Board will have the best seat at Monday night's Bruce Springsteen concert. She'll be so far above the Meadowlands that she won't be able to hear the songs, but the British-born Board won't mind a bit because she'll be high above in the cockpit of a 2,770-pound blimp. The flyover will be one of nearly three dozen that the Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey blimp will make this summer with Board at the helm. Next week, the huge white-and-blue airship will be in the sky over the Night in Venice Parade in Ocean City.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 20, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAKEHURST -- At 178 feet long and 56 feet high, the massive airship dwarfed members of the ground crew Thursday as they strained to hold on to tethering lines like so many Lilliputians trying to control Gulliver. Inside the gondola of the Navy's MZ-3A, pilots Mark Kynett and Larry Chambers made the final checks, and then - with two powerful engines roaring at their back - aimed the blimp at a sharp angle into the sky and took off from Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst. The ship's flight near historic Hangar 1 at the Naval Air Engineering Station conjured up images of Germany's ill-fated Hindenburg and its fiery destruction there 75 years earlier.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2012 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
AKRON, Ohio - I made my mother's lifelong dream come true on an overcast Tuesday morning. "Oh. My. Goodness," my mom said, her eyes shining as she peered down on the houses, roads, and farm fields below us. "This is so exciting. " Other people yearn for big things like sparkly jewelry, grand houses, massive fortunes. But my mother - Jean Metzger Graham - has always had another fascination. Blimps. Yes, blimps. Mom has lived her entire life in Northeast Philadelphia, and is the sort of person who rarely asks for anything for herself.
NEWS
August 10, 2012 | Breaking News Desk, Inquirer staff writer
The Army has followed the Navy in testing a new generation of blimps at the New Jersey military base where the Hindenberg infamously burst into flames in 1937. The Army's $517 million spy blimp - a high-altitude observation platform, according to the manufacturer - had its maiden flight Tuesday at Ocean County's Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst. (See video: http://ow.ly/cRi5E .) The Long Endurance Multi-Intelligence Vehicle, a 302-foot dirigible, can be manned or remote-controlled, according to Northrop Grumman.
SPORTS
October 7, 2010 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the daily jobs of a sportswriter is to check the e-mail, which can get piled up like a hoarder's living room if you let a day or two pass. The readers write, and you almost always try to answer. (Hey, why is my nose growing?) The other stuff - advertisements, White House messages, and warnings from the system administrator that your mailbox is over its limit - get immediately ignored or deleted. Every once in a while, however, one grabs your attention and forces you to open it at the risk of infecting your laptop with the latest evil computer virus.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2006 | By Thomas J. Brady INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When David Betzner wanted to diversify his mapmaking business, he decided to shoot for the sky. The result is Vertical View L.L.C., which takes aerial photographs from a small, unmanned blimp. The photos can be taken from as low as 12 feet, and offer high-resolution detail. Betzner said using an unmanned blimp was less expensive than using a helicopter. Yesterday, Vertical View sent its blimp aloft to take about 280 pictures of a planned condominium site at 1706 S. Rittenhouse Square St. Construction has not started, but the assignment was to take photographs at 29 elevations ranging from 56 to 360 feet to show prospective buyers of the condos views from each floor.
NEWS
September 20, 2006 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a dream come true 80 years in the making for 87-year-old Valentine Seidle. For Betty Frey, 83, it was a desire to conquer childhood memories of the ill-fated Hindenburg's smoldering on the ground. And so yesterday they and four other seniors from two retirement communities in Philadelphia and Doylestown went to Atlantic City's Bader Field to board a gigantic white-and-blue blimp for a 30-minute ride above the casinos, Boardwalk and coastline. The ride on Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey's airship - one of only 20 such blimps in the world, Horizon said - was a wish granted by Horizon and the Twilight Wish Foundation.
NEWS
July 20, 2003 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kate Board will have the best seat at Monday night's Bruce Springsteen concert. She'll be so far above the Meadowlands that she won't be able to hear the songs, but the British-born Board won't mind a bit because she'll be high above in the cockpit of a 2,770-pound blimp. The flyover will be one of nearly three dozen that the Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey blimp will make this summer with Board at the helm. This week, the huge white-and-blue airship will be in the sky over the Night in Venice Parade in Ocean City.
NEWS
July 19, 2003 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kate Board will have the best seat at Monday night's Bruce Springsteen concert. She'll be so far above the Meadowlands that she won't be able to hear the songs, but the British-born Board won't mind a bit because she'll be high above in the cockpit of a 2,770-pound blimp. The flyover will be one of nearly three dozen that the Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey blimp will make this summer with Board at the helm. Next week, the huge white-and-blue airship will be in the sky over the Night in Venice Parade in Ocean City.
NEWS
May 21, 2003 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At 2:30 on the afternoon of July 6, 1960, Frank Mikuletzky, first mate on the Doris May III, was cutting bait for bluefish on the Barnegat Ridge when the party boat's skipper suddenly opened the throttle to full speed ahead. "That wasn't normal," said Mikuletzky, who was 19 then and is 62 now. "I ran up to the bridge to see what was going on. Charlie Eble, the captain, told me a blimp had crashed. " In what was to become one in a series of Cold War disasters in New Jersey or off its coast, a 403-foot-long Navy blimp had plunged from the sky, killing 18 of its 21 officers and crew members.
SPORTS
September 21, 2001 | By Mike Bruton INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There will be some inconvenience, but fans should be able to relax and enjoy games at NFL venues Sunday and Monday as the league tightens security in an effort to prevent terrorism. The attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon last week prompted the league to reexamine its security regimen and add restrictions. The NFL says the changes will do little to change the habits of fans if they plan to arrive at the stadiums early and follow guidelines on parking and what they can carry into the various arenas.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|