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Blind Date

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NEWS
February 12, 1989 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
The Romans had Cupid. The Greeks had Eros. Abington High School students have Lou Martin. Though not a matchmaker by avocation, Martin, a sociology and psychology teacher, has been setting up blind dates for the last six years as part of his class lessons on dating, marriage and family. He's the modern-day version of the old village matchmaker. "It's like (the television show) The Love Connection," said Nancy Baksis, a senior who volunteered to go on a blind date when she took Martin's sociology class.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2004 | HOWARD GENSLER gensleh@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
THE WORLD OF reality TV is a strange place, but it's hard to imagine tuning in to "Blind Date" and getting "America's Most Wanted. " But that's what happened when Ulrick White recently appeared on the show, looking for love. The New York Daily News reports that White has been eluding police for a year after being sought in the rape of a California woman. Turns out she was watching the show the night White was a contestant and she realized he was her attacker after a possible female match referred to him by his nickname and he replied with his thick Jamaican accent.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2000 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Put a jilted husband (Reg Rogers), a neurotic single woman (Ally Sheedy), and a handgun together on a blind date, and the trigger-happy results are this New York comedy that advocates emotional recognition rather than physical confrontation. In this sharp if sitcommy farce written and directed by Adrienne Shelly, Rogers plays a brokenhearted real estate broker whose wife has left him for his good friend, who bought a country house from him. Sheedy plays an aging punkette who agrees to go on a "mercy date" with him, only to hear Mr. Heartbreak bluntly enumerate the ways that she is a loser.
LIVING
August 30, 1995 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bob and Elaine Smith easily could have been one of the couples in the book The Good Marriage - with one exception. When asked about disappointments in the marriage, unlike Judith S. Wallerstein's subjects, they drew a blank. The Center City couple met on a blind date - Bob's 27th, he sheepishly confesses - when he was in medical school and she was a freshman in college. The attraction was immediate and intense. What did they do on their first date? "We talked," said Elaine, with a "what else would we do?"
NEWS
October 31, 2000 | By Kaitlin Gurney, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Eleven sorority sisters bade Amanda Cuneo goodbye on Friday with the tenderness appropriate before a trip to Siberia. But the Rowan University senior was just going on a first date - with the whole world watching, it seemed. Cuneo's South Philly blind date with Troy Querec will be shown in December on the TLC Daytime show A Dating Story. Her Alpha Sigma Alpha sister Ariana Tsoutsas played matchmaker for Cuneo, 23, and Querec, 22, a childhood friend who works as a cancer researcher at the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 28, 1987 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
In much the same way that Bruce Willis is the PG-rated Mickey Rourke, Blind Date, his movie debut, is a sanitized After Hours. But don't blame Willis. It's not his fault that the excruciating Blind Date has as many laughs as a surgeon extracting his own funnybone. You can see the high concept behind director Blake Edwards' botch: Lure couch potatoes to theaters by featuring three beloved television actors - Willis, John Larroquette and William Daniels - in a farce in which they play characters similar to their TV personas.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"Blind Date," a comedy starring Kim Basinger, Bruce Willis, John Larroquette and William Daniels. Directed by Blake Edwards. Screenplay by Dale Launer. Running time: 96 minutes. A Tri-Star release. At area theaters. At one point deep into "Blind Date," William Daniels putts a golf ball under his bed. Don't ask why - that's not the point. The point is that we know - know - that one beat after the ball rolls under, we will hear a soft thud, and one beat after that we will hear Bruce Willis emit a muffled groan.
NEWS
August 27, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James A. Grundy, 81, formerly of Riverton, retired owner of an insurance agency for car collectors, died of Alzheimer's disease Friday at Manor Care in Towson, Md. Mr. Grundy graduated from Lower Merion High School. During World War II, he served in the Army in the Philippines and Korea. After his discharge, he worked for an insurer in Philadelphia, then established his firm in Jenkintown in the mid-1950s. He began to specialize in policies for classic cars after his father-in-law, Sam Baily, a collector, said the policies would be profitable because the cars were valuable and unlikely to be damaged in accidents.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2002 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
At least somebody's getting married. ABC's sex-and-romance "reality" show, The Bachelor, premiered Monday, parading 25 beautiful women past a prime-time hunk of beef, promising that if he loves one of them enough, he'll propose to her on the air April 29. He's just as likely to run screaming from his bachelor pad to escape the voracious lovelies. But yesterday in Los Angeles, Brad Gilbert and Wendy Czaikoski were scheduled to take real wedding vows. They met on Blind Date, the biggest wave in a tide of so-called relationship shows that titillate a predominantly youthful audience on the fringes of the TV nation.
NEWS
June 28, 2010
Martin Ginsburg, 78, the husband of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and a prominent lawyer in his own right, died Sunday from complications of metastatic cancer. The Supreme Court said in a statement that Mr. Ginsburg died at home. The Ginsburgs celebrated their 56th wedding anniversary just last week. They met on a blind date as undergraduates at Cornell University. Martin Ginsburg was an expert in tax law and taught at New York University, Columbia University, and Georgetown University over the course of his career.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
While I'm away, readers give the advice. On playing a bad hand: I've been going toe-to-toe with an autoimmune disorder for 40 years. It went undiagnosed for 13 months; once it became clear what it was, I spent several years being livid that it was not cancer, because I was sure at least cancer would kill me. I also went through periods when I had to get up in the morning to take my meds, then go back to bed to wait for them to work....
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2015 | By Drew Lazor, For The Inquirer
No professionals are forced to bear witness to more mind-numbingly bad dates than bartenders, making them uniquely qualified to comment on the singles scene. Now that it's put-yourself-out-there, spring-fling season, online dating tools like Tinder, Match.com, and OkCupid will be flooded with activity from new users and from dating vets returning after a long, cold hiatus. Bartenders see everything that happens - even if they don't want to. "It's like watching a movie, and there's that awkward moment where you're like, 'I don't want to watch!
NEWS
April 18, 2013
Mickey Rose, 77, a childhood friend of Woody Allen's who cowrote his movies Bananas and Take the Money and Run , died of cancer April 7 at his home in Beverly Hills, his daughter, Jennifer, told the Los Angeles Times. Mr. Rose and Allen met in high school in Brooklyn, N.Y., and became friends. They shared a love of jazz and baseball. Mr. Rose met his late wife, Judy, through a blind date arranged by Allen. Mr. Rose became a TV comedy writer. He wrote for Johnny Carson and Sid Caesar and for shows including The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour , All in the Family , and The Odd Couple . Allen said Rose was one of the funniest people he has known - and a "wonderful first baseman.
NEWS
January 27, 2013 | By Roger Moore, MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE
Movie 43 is a collection of one-joke short films strung together as a feature, movies seemingly built on this guiding directive: Find big-name stars and see how far they'll go for a laugh. Thus, you have Kate Winslet on a blind date with Hugh Jackman trying not to notice - or be utterly revolted by - the scrotum growing out of his neck. There's Halle Berry caught up in a first-date game of Truth or Dare with Brit comic Stephen Merchant that involves tattoos, plastic surgery, and sitting still while Snooki from Jersey Shore gives an interpretive reading of Moby Dick . If you're the sort who laughs at the title of that novel, this might be the movie for you - a dizzying array of actors in a wide variety of oh-no-they-didn't sketches, almost all using sex as punch lines.
NEWS
January 17, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph Straus Jr., 91, of Lafayette Hill, retired chairman of the former Strouse, Greenberg & Co., died Saturday, Jan. 12, of natural causes at his home. Mr. Straus was a nationally known real estate figure in Philadelphia from the 1950s through the mid-1990s. He joined Strouse as a partner in the mid-1960s and became its chairman. "He was one of the early pioneers in the development of large, enclosed regional shopping centers on the East Coast," said his son, Jim. One was Deptford Mall.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2013 | By Dan Gross
M ARK WAHLBERG and director Allen Hughes will be in town Tuesday to attend a red-carpet screening of their new film, "Broken City," at 7 p.m. at the Prince Music Theater (1412 Chestnut). Mayor Nutter and Greater Philadelphia Film Office chief Sharon Pinkenson will introduce the pair and make a special presentation to Wahlberg, who has shot several films in the area, including "Invincible," "The Lovely Bones" and "Shooter. If you'd like to attend, email your name and phone number to Philly@43KIX.com . A limited amount of free tickets remain.
NEWS
January 1, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jane Grinspan, 66, of Merion, a writer, cook, and longtime publications director for the Franklin Institute, died Sunday, Dec. 30, of breast cancer, at her home. Mrs. Grinspan was a 50-year resident of the Philadelphia area. Her family said she was a renaissance woman with wide-ranging talents. In 1971, she was hired at the Franklin Institute, where she spent 39 years as a writer and editor before retiring in 2010. She relished the city's food and arts scene, and parlayed her knowledge into restaurant reviews that appeared in the Bulletin in the early 1970s.
NEWS
December 18, 2012 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
AFTER HIS USUAL hyperactive week as the city's chief financial watchdog, City Controller Alan Butkovitz spends a couple of hours on Sunday afternoon chillin' a few blocks from home at the Country Club Restaurant in Rhawnhurst with his wife of 39 years, Theresa. "We met in 1971 when I was late for a blind date with Theresa's friend, Mary, at Logan Circle," Butkovitz said. "Mary said she left after a couple of sailors tried to pick her up. " "I was in the room afterward when Mary told Alan off on the phone," Theresa says.
NEWS
December 11, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara Ann McBride Nolan, 67, a nurse and longtime zoo volunteer who taught visitors about animals and nature, died on Wednesday, Dec. 5, of ovarian cancer at her home in Springfield, Delaware County. Mrs. Nolan became enamored with nature, animals, and conservation while growing up on a farm in the Valley Forge area and parlayed that love into 23 years as a docent, or volunteer teacher, for the Philadelphia Zoo. During that time, she served on many zoo committees and participated in several animal behavior programs.
NEWS
November 14, 2012 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stan Morantz, 69, of Warrington, a longtime Philadelphia business owner and inventor, died Saturday, Nov. 10, at Doylestown Hospital of complications from Lou Gehrig's disease. Morantz Ultrasonics, headquartered in Northeast Philadelphia, with an office in Las Vegas, and having $3 million in revenue annually, grew from his father's drapery business at 40th and Chestnut Streets. While working for his father, who used labor-intensive techniques to make draperies, he invented tools and processes to speed up manufacturing.
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