CollectionsBlind People
IN THE NEWS

Blind People

NEWS
April 21, 1997 | By Heather Moore, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It makes no difference if Brandon Grady swims above or below the surface of the warm, heavily chlorinated water of the indoor pool at the Variety Club Campus. He sees the same thing. Darkness. But that has little to do with his ability to swim, said Grady, 16, who is blind. "I'd say I'm above average," he said, dripping wet and a little out of breath after the 100-foot backstroke. His self-evaluation was slightly more modest than that of his brother, Ben, who was with him here over the weekend for the 10th Northeast-Davidow Regional Games, hosted by the Pennsylvania Association for Blind Athletes (PABA)
NEWS
April 8, 1997 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four times a year, thousands of college undergraduates take the Law School Admissions Test, the first hurdle for those hoping to right society's wrongs in the courts. Now, the organization that administers the test has been sued in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia by three blind students who contend that the test poses a different kind of hurdle for them. Backed by the National Federation of the Blind, the students maintain that the Law School Admissions Council's refusal to let them use their own readers, or Braille note-taking equipment, ensures that the blind will do poorly on the grueling exam - and violates the federal Americans With Disabilities Act. This is believed to be the first time blind plaintiffs have challenged the constitutionality of a standardized test.
NEWS
November 17, 1996 | By Raphael Lewis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Lil Wyer cradled her brand-new bowling ball and grinned, even though the shiny blue bundle had spent as much of the night wallowing in the gutter as it had knocking down pins. Wyer, an Upper Darby retiree, was content with her performance. After all, she had just bowled an 88 in her first game of the night, 21 points above her season average. If she kept that up, "Three Guys and One Doll" stood a slim chance of defeating "Banana Bunch," the number-one team in the Delaware Valley Blind Bowlers' League.
NEWS
January 2, 1996 | By JOSEPH SOBRAN
Christians have always believed that God is omnipotent and omniscient. Well, the divine attributes have been expanded: He is now inclusive too. In fact He is no longer "He. " "Our Father-Mother in heaven, hallowed be your name," goes the Lord's Prayer (Catholics call it the Our Father) in The New Testament and Psalms: An Inclusive Version, published by Oxford University Press. This new version is not really a translation, but an attempt, based on the New Revised Standard Version, to correct earlier translations.
NEWS
September 15, 1995 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Patricia Kelly says she'll be back at her desk at the Chester County Association for the Blind in Coatesville Monday, though transportation will cost her $300 a month. Kelly, who is blind, has been stranded for two weeks at her home here without a ride to work. She said yesterday that she decided the cost was necessary to keep her $23,000-a-year job. "You can't beat the system," she said. The paratransit service now available in Chester County for blind people who are not elderly costs $1.50 a mile for door-to-door service - about $950 a month for Kelly.
NEWS
September 10, 1995 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Patricia Kelly has always considered herself a competent, contributing member of society. Although blind, she has been employed since 1974. But because of gaps in the public transportation system that Kelly considers unfair, she is facing the likelihood of being fired as early as Tuesday because she lost her ride to work two weeks ago. The county's paratransit service provides free or reduced-cost rides for pregnant teenagers, people...
NEWS
August 31, 1995 | By Molly Peterson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In March, 67-year-old Atsuko Yasumoto climbed, through heavy snow, to the top of a mountain near her native Tokyo. "Everybody told us to stop, but we continued," Yasumoto said of her climbing group, which tackles several mountains a year. "It was so hard, but we did it. " Yasumoto, who is blind, is no stranger to difficulties. But giving up has never been her style. She and two of her friends - also blind - are currently fulfilling a longtime dream to visit the United States.
NEWS
June 8, 1995 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Advocates for disabled people yesterday asked a federal judge to cite SEPTA for contempt of a 1992 order requiring the agency's bus and subway drivers to announce stops as a way to help blind passengers. "SEPTA continues to be in noncompliance with a very clear and simple requirement, that its drivers call out the stops," Thomas Earle, a lawyer with the Disabilities Law Project, told U.S. District Judge Louis C. Bechtle. "All we want is them simply calling out the stops," Earle added.
NEWS
June 4, 1995 | By Molly Peterson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When you're unable to see what you're doing, a task as seemingly simple as counting change can be a major undertaking. Pennies and nickels are nearly indistinguishable. "Now imagine doing that in a store, while the people behind you are telling you to hurry up," said Patty Silver, during an at-home demonstration of what it's like to live without sight. Silver, 42, who has been blind for almost 12 years, has developed many methods for meeting such challenges. When she speaks at schools, clubs, church groups and other organizations, she uses a crateful of materials for a hands- on demonstration of how she copes with blindness.
NEWS
January 5, 1995 | Daily News wire services
BOSTON HE'S INDICTED IN ABORTION SHOOTINGS A federal grand jury yesterday indicted John C. Salvi III on charges he carried across state lines the rifle he allegedly used to shoot up three abortion clinics in Massachusetts and Virginia, killing two women. The 22-year-old student hairdresser, who was being held in a Norfolk, Va., jail, could get up to 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine on each of two federal counts. The indictment should get Salvi back to Massachusetts faster than if he had gone through the extradition process between the states, legal experts said.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|