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Blizzard

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BUSINESS
January 16, 1996 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER The Associated Press also contributed to this report
Snow plowers and salt sellers have been heralded as the smartest businesspeople around, but there are others profiting from the Blizzard of '96. To see how companies benefited from the frozen stuff, you have to consider the situations that consumers were in. Let's start at the beginning. First, they were stuck at home. Once channel-surfing got boring, the next option was the VCR. "Business doubled last week," said Richard Stallings, day manager at the TLA Video outlet on Spring Garden Street.
NEWS
February 15, 1994 | BY DAVID M. VITA
Do these words sound familiar? "There is a winter storm warning posted for Philadelphia with the potential for a heavy accumulation of snow. " One cannot count on all the fingers and toes how many times these words have been said to no avail. These "snowstorms" mostly never seem to materialize. Meteorologists from the National Weather Service and newscasters from the three major networks time and time again have caused mass panic in this city for nothing. On the local news, the newscasters always seem to put the emphasis of a given weather forecast on all areas except Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 8, 1987 | By Cheryl Baisden, Special to The Inquirer
Four Gloucester County College students, calico baby bonnets tied under their chins, stood in the student center cafeteria draining orange juice from their baby bottles. As each finished the snack he squealed a contented "goo- goo ga-ga" at the lunchtime crowd. Under normal circumstances, imitating babies in front of 300 fellow students would have earned the students the disdain of their classmates, but on this day - the day before April Fools' Day - such antics endeared them to their friends and gave them a chance for a windfall.
NEWS
January 29, 1988 | By Tom Fox, Inquirer Editorial Board
When the snow began piling up the other day I got to thinking about the celebrated Blizzard of '88, a monumental snowstorm that lives on in Philadelphia lore. I don't know why I thought about the Blizzard of '88. This week's snowfalls were a piece of cake compared to the dump that slowed Philadelphia to a crawl on March 11 and 12, 1888, almost a century ago. In my early years in Philadelphia I heard old men, men in their 80s and beyond, talk about the Blizzard of '88. They said it was the worst storm ever, and if I didn't believe it, I should check National Geographic.
NEWS
February 6, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
Last month's blizzard blew through the city's entire annual $5.2 million snow budget - and a few million more, according to city estimates. Philadelphia spent $8.5 million to clean up the 22.5 inches of snow dumped the weekend of Jan. 23, city spokesman Mike Dunn said. The snowstorm was one of Mayor Kenney's first tests. He had been in office less than three weeks when he had to oversee the snow emergency. His administration estimates it spent $1.7 million in employee overtime, $1.4 million on salt, and $5.4 million on contractors.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1993 | By Andrew Cassel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hit hard by blizzards and bombings, Cigna Corp. reported sharply lower profits for the first quarter of 1993. Before accounting changes and gains on the sale of investments such as bonds and real estate, the Philadelphia-based insurance company earned $16 million, or 22 cents per share, in the quarter, down from $64 million, or 89 cents per share, a year ago. Cigna's property-casualty insurance division lost $79 million in the quarter, even...
NEWS
January 23, 1996 | LOUIS J. GAMBACCINI, President/CEO Southeastern Pa. Transit Authority
The Broad Street Subway stuttered a bit, but never really skipped a beat during the Blizzard of '96. In fact, it would lead the legion of SEPTA blizzard busters, starting with the rail services and then, after lifting of travel restrictions, the bus fleets, in the most dramatic demonstration in history that public transit matters to everyone in this region. There was never a time during the blizzard SEPTA was out of service. In fact, SEPTA employees worked in the most severe weather conditions to assure that vehicles would be "at your service" as soon as possible.
SPORTS
November 16, 1998 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
When the new-look Rage lost at New England in the ABL season opener earlier this month, the question arose whether the team's performances in two preseason victories - including one over the Blizzard - were mere happenstances. Perhaps it was just the season opener that was out of character. The Rage (3-1) returned to Hartford yesterday and beat New England, 80-72. It was the third straight victory under new coach Anne Donovan since the opening setback - the Rage's best run since taking the first three games of last season.
SPORTS
March 21, 1999 | By Pete Schnatz, FOR THE INQUIRER
Hitting their stride with the NPSL playoffs just around the corner, the Kixx turned in another impressive performance last night by burying Buffalo, 21-7, at the First Union Spectrum. In extending their season-high winning streak to six games, the Kixx (20-14) treated the crowd of 10,279 to a display of hard-nosed, disciplined defense and a balanced, opportunistic offense. Nine players recorded at least one point in the blowout for the East Division leaders. And when they weren't scoring, the Kixx were scrambling back to their own end, blanketing the Blizzard attackers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2015
THIS WEEK'S epic snowstorm turned out to be a big bust. But before we knew that, the lucky among us spent Monday night with hot toddies, warming our toes in front of fireplaces with our significant others. Some of those not already all loved up turned to Craigslist in a frantic search for last-minute blizzard boyfriends and girlfriends. That's right. Nestled among all the usual Craigslist ads for anonymous sex encounters and threesomes were quite a few postings from Philadelphians desperately seeking blizzard buddies with whom to weather yesterday's snowfall, which weathercasters had predicted accumulations of up to a foot.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 7, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis, Staff Writer
While admitting no missteps in its storm planning, the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission on Tuesday pledged to improve its weather-forecasting capacity after coming under fire for its response to a January blizzard that stranded hundreds of motorists for 24 hours. The recommendation came in a 30-page "After Action Report" that summarized what commission officials had billed as its comprehensive, 10-week internal review of how it handled the storm. But the report did little to pinpoint any failures of internal planning.
NEWS
March 26, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania and New Jersey stand to receive more than $85 million in federal disaster money to pay for costs associated with the January blizzard. President Obama signed a "major disaster" declaration Wednesday that made Federal Emergency Management Agency funds available to 22 of the 67 counties in Pennsylvania. He signed a similar declaration last week for 17 of New Jersey's 22 counties. Locally, Bucks, Burlington, Camden, Chester, Montgomery, and Philadelphia Counties qualified for the assistance under the complicated federal requirements for damage thresholds.
NEWS
February 20, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis, Staff Writer
A day before last month's blizzard left hundreds of motorists stranded along a stretch of road under his agency's supervision, the Pennsylvania Turnpike's chief executive attended a Harrisburg briefing at which the governor's top meteorologist warned that at least 12 to 18 inches of snow would fall along the corridor. Forecaster Jeff Jumper repeated his projections in three video briefings to state officials the next day, including one monitored by turnpike managers. "Anything along the track of the turnpike would have been among the hardest-hit areas," Jumper said Thursday, recalling his message.
NEWS
February 12, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis, Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Weeks after a snowstorm trapped hundreds of trucks, buses, and cars on an 11-mile stretch for a day, Pennsylvania Turnpike officials said Wednesday they would start testing removable median barriers that might prevent such bottlenecks in the future. In the first legislative hearing on the debacle, turnpike and state police officials insisted they did their best in responding to the ferocious storm that battered the state and paralyzed roads on Jan. 22 and 23. But they said they had limited options to remove vehicles and drivers buried by snow and hemmed in by the permanent concrete medians that divide the turnpike in a stretch with no exits between Bedford and Somerset.
NEWS
February 6, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
Last month's blizzard blew through the city's entire annual $5.2 million snow budget - and a few million more, according to city estimates. Philadelphia spent $8.5 million to clean up the 22.5 inches of snow dumped the weekend of Jan. 23, city spokesman Mike Dunn said. The snowstorm was one of Mayor Kenney's first tests. He had been in office less than three weeks when he had to oversee the snow emergency. His administration estimates it spent $1.7 million in employee overtime, $1.4 million on salt, and $5.4 million on contractors.
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis and Chris Palmer, STAFF WRITERS
For nearly 24 hours, said Philadelphia lawyer Mark Kaltenbach, he had gone nowhere but the driver's seat of his car, stranded with 500 other motorists on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. It was dark, bitter cold - wind chills were in the single digits - and blizzardlike conditions were everywhere. He got out of his car and walked. Kaltenbach trudged in snow 2 to 3 feet deep from mile marker 129 to mile marker 127.5, only to find that a turnpike telephone recording had wrongly said he would find emergency workers there.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
Over the weekend, tons of snow were whipped into a frenzy by gale-force winds and deposited unevenly onto roofs in the region. A little bit on some sections of roof; a lot on others. Now, after a couple of days of higher temperatures and melting, weight shouldn't be a major issue, though roofs that aren't in good repair may still run the risk of cave-in. Jonas was the first major storm of the winter, and unless a residential roof structure is damaged or decayed, it should be able to support 20 pounds per square foot of snow before becoming stressed, the Insurance Information Institute says.
NEWS
January 27, 2016
By John C. Raines I am 82 years old and live on a narrow street near Fitler Square in Center City. And during last weekend's snowstorm, I worried about my front walk and shoveling. I am not as strong as I used to be. And then I heard a shovel - not mine - on the walk outside. It was the young family down the street. They were taking care of me, without my even asking. It is so easy to be cynical these days. It is so easy to give up on something called the common good. It is so easy to give up on dreams that reach out beyond our own desperate ones for our isolated future.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | BY DAN GERINGER, Staff Writer
SEPTA General Manager Jeff Knueppel, who announced Monday that 75 percent of the blizzard-battered public-transit system was running again, said he was teased by a reporter earlier this winter after buying gigantic snow-fighting machines. The 28-year SEPTA veteran, who has battled the four biggest snowstorms in Philadelphia history, oversaw the purchase of a rail-riding, snow-throwing monster truck with a rotating arm that looks like something out of Mad Max: Fury Road . "It was the age-old situation where you buy a snowblower and there's a winter with no snow," Knueppel told the Daily News, laughing.
SPORTS
January 26, 2016 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
NEW YORK - I went to Brooklyn to cover a game and ended up covering a practice. I mean, we're talking about a practice.   The original assignment: the Flyers vs. the New York Islanders Saturday night at the Barclays Center. As tasks go, this did not rank up there with covering the America's Cup in Australia, which The Inquirer did once during the golden age of newspapers and United States yacht racing. Still, I was looking forward to seeing Brooklyn's relatively new arena for the first time.
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