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NEWS
March 9, 1989 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Of all the themes available to a photographer, none seems more fraught with anxiety for artist and subject, or more susceptible to misunderstanding by an audience, than the adolescent female nude, particularly if the artist is a man. Yet the pubescent female is a challenging and fascinating theme precisely because she connotes an incipient sexuality that society, and parents, try to ignore or deny. Capturing that quality without suggesting prurient interest is one of the more formidable tasks an artist could set for him or herself.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Herman Hassinger, an architect, and his wife, Doris, who lived in Moorestown before moving to Block Island, R.I., died Thursday, Oct. 25, in a small-airplane crash, a family spokesman said Wednesday. The two died of injuries from when their single-engine Beechcraft hit a light pole along I-93 in Hooksett, N.H., sending it into nearby woods. They were going to a board meeting at the private New Hampton (N.H.) School. Mr. Hassinger, 83, a retired Coast Guard commander, had operated Herman Hassinger Architects of Moorestown.
TRAVEL
May 1, 2011 | By Vinny Vella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Soarin' Eagle and Steeplechase, Coney Island's first new roller coasters in 84 years, are joining the legendary Cyclone and a revamped boardwalk. Cape May was just named one of the Top 10 beach destinations in the world by members of TripAdvisor (see "checkin," N4 ). And Washington will unveil a memorial to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on the National Mall. Whether it's a new ride or a perennial favorite, a site visited long ago or long overlooked, there are plenty of staycation spots that can be reached from Center City on one tank of gas. How many miles is that?
NEWS
May 6, 1999 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Stanley Emil Jacke, 74, of Malvern, a retired executive vice president of SmithKline Beecham, died of cardiac arrest Monday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia. Mr. Jacke worked for the ultrasonic division of SmithKline in Connecticut for 21 years before transferring to Philadelphia. He retired in 1984. After retiring, Mr. Jacke had his own consulting company, Aspen Sonics Inc., in Malvern, where he lived for 18 years. Mr. Jacke held 17 electrical engineering patents and is credited with inventing ultrasonic plastic welding, said his son, Doug.
NEWS
June 12, 2000 | by Regina Medina, Daily News Staff Writer
Capt. Thomas Michael Lippo, commander of the Police Department 12th District in Southwest Philadelphia, has some loyal friends. But one chum stands out. Here's a story about deep friendship, perseverance and good detective work. It involves Lippo, one of this year's Fencl Award finalists, and Capt. Bill Colarulo, who won the award in 1998. Three years ago, Lippo went on vacation with his wife, Susan. His mom was the only person who knew how to reach them. The 49-year-old police officer had taken his captain exam a few weeks before.
NEWS
March 24, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Weld Coxe, 81, a management consultant for architectural firms, died of complications from Parkinson's disease Tuesday, March 15, at Cathedral Village, the retirement community in Andorra, where he had been a founding board member. Mr. Coxe created a career in the 1960s when it became acceptable for architects to market themselves. Previously, the practice had been considered unethical, said his son, Donald. In 1967, Mr. Coxe established Weld Coxe & Associates in Philadelphia. The firm later became the Coxe Group, with offices in Center City and Seattle.
NEWS
October 30, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
CORPUS CHRISTI BOY, 10, EXPELLED IN ARSON ATTEMPT A 10-year-old boy was expelled from school yesterday after allegedly dousing his principal's office with gasoline and acid in an attempt to set it ablaze. School officials believe the boy was angry about being called to the office Monday after he was accused of hitting another pupil last week. Principal Gloria Garcia "called him in, he bolts from the office and leaves the campus," school district spokesman Scott Elliff said.
NEWS
December 19, 1990
In his autobiography, Benjamin Franklin told of how at age 17 he had decided not to become a complete vegetarian after all. This selection was suggested by Harriette Behringer. Being becalmed off Block Island, our people set about catching cod, and hauled up a great many. Hitherto, I had stuck to my resolution of not eating animal food, and I considered the taking of every fish as a kind of unprovoked murder, since none of them . . . could do us any injury that might justify the slaughter.
NEWS
July 12, 1992 | By Donald D. Groff, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Question: We're interested in visiting Branson, Mo., the site of country music theaters. None of the travel agents we've talked to has heard of it! W.B., Cherry Hill Answer: Branson is a tourist hot spot that some people think is eclipsing Nashville as the nation's country-music capital. It's located in southwest Missouri in the Ozarks, just above the Arkansas state line. Branson's country and mountain music heritage goes back many decades, but in recent years its theater scene has exploded.
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | By Mary Jane Fine, Inquirer Staff Writer
We never planned to vacation on Cape Cod. Nothing against it. We've been here before and, most likely, we'll come again. It simply wasn't in our plans. Our plans called for a week on Block Island, a favorite place, a year-after-year destination. But a developer changed all that. And, as it turned out, developers and real estate development became a theme for this vacation week. We never planned it that way. On the morning that our ferry would have been chugging into Block Island harbor, my husband and I were here, playing can-you-top-this with my aunt and uncle on the subject of real estate developers.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | By David Klepper, Associated Press
NARRAGANSETT, R.I. - Independent Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee is joining the Democratic Party ahead of his 2014 bid for a second term, his spokeswoman said Wednesday, confirming a move that Chafee has been talking about for months as a way to better position himself for reelection. Chafee would not immediately address the party switch when asked about it Wednesday after he exited a ferry from Block Island to the mainland, saying only that he would announce his decision at his local Board of Canvassers meeting in Warwick on Thursday.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Herman Hassinger, an architect, and his wife, Doris, who lived in Moorestown before moving to Block Island, R.I., died Thursday, Oct. 25, in a small-airplane crash, a family spokesman said Wednesday. The two died of injuries from when their single-engine Beechcraft hit a light pole along I-93 in Hooksett, N.H., sending it into nearby woods. They were going to a board meeting at the private New Hampton (N.H.) School. Mr. Hassinger, 83, a retired Coast Guard commander, had operated Herman Hassinger Architects of Moorestown.
TRAVEL
May 1, 2011 | By Vinny Vella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Soarin' Eagle and Steeplechase, Coney Island's first new roller coasters in 84 years, are joining the legendary Cyclone and a revamped boardwalk. Cape May was just named one of the Top 10 beach destinations in the world by members of TripAdvisor (see "checkin," N4 ). And Washington will unveil a memorial to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on the National Mall. Whether it's a new ride or a perennial favorite, a site visited long ago or long overlooked, there are plenty of staycation spots that can be reached from Center City on one tank of gas. How many miles is that?
NEWS
March 24, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Weld Coxe, 81, a management consultant for architectural firms, died of complications from Parkinson's disease Tuesday, March 15, at Cathedral Village, the retirement community in Andorra, where he had been a founding board member. Mr. Coxe created a career in the 1960s when it became acceptable for architects to market themselves. Previously, the practice had been considered unethical, said his son, Donald. In 1967, Mr. Coxe established Weld Coxe & Associates in Philadelphia. The firm later became the Coxe Group, with offices in Center City and Seattle.
NEWS
May 17, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard H. Magaziner, 91, a former Upper Dublin Township commissioner, died of congestive heart failure Thursday, April 22, in a nursing unit at the Quadrangle in Haverford, where he had lived for 10 years. His surviving brother, Henry, was the regional historical architect for the National Park Service from 1972 to 1988. Their father was the architect Louis Magaziner. Richard Magaziner spent his career, from 1953 to his 1984 retirement, with the Center City and Valley Forge offices of Connecticut General Life Insurance Co. and its successors.
NEWS
July 31, 2004 | By Dick Cooper INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joe Ferry had hoped to use the light of July's blue moon to guide his approach to his father's home on Ireland's coast. Instead, the moonlight helped him this week as he sailed back into the Chesapeake Bay. His attempt to single-handedly sail his 32-foot boat across the Atlantic was cut short when he realized early in the voyage that he and his boat were not ready for the task. Ferry, 57, sat on the couch in the den of his home in Springfield, Delaware County, across from a wall of family photos, as he talked yesterday about his decision to put the trip off "for another year or two. " "One thing about people my age is that we get to make some sober decisions," he said.
NEWS
June 24, 2004 | By Dick Cooper INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A wry grin crosses Joe Ferry's face, and his blue eyes brighten as he opens a chart that tracks the winds of the North Atlantic. He points to a spot about 500 miles east of New Jersey where his trip will change course for Ireland. Ferry, 57, of Springfield, Delaware County, will leave Ocean City, N.J., on July 4. He will be reversing the passage his father, Joseph D. Ferry, made to America 75 years ago. Ferry is going on a 32-foot sailboat, alone. Ferry says he has sailed the Chesapeake and rowed the Schuylkill for years but has not sailed farther than the 160 miles to Block Island, R.I. He says he doesn't have a profound answer to why he is going solo.
NEWS
June 12, 2000 | by Regina Medina, Daily News Staff Writer
Capt. Thomas Michael Lippo, commander of the Police Department 12th District in Southwest Philadelphia, has some loyal friends. But one chum stands out. Here's a story about deep friendship, perseverance and good detective work. It involves Lippo, one of this year's Fencl Award finalists, and Capt. Bill Colarulo, who won the award in 1998. Three years ago, Lippo went on vacation with his wife, Susan. His mom was the only person who knew how to reach them. The 49-year-old police officer had taken his captain exam a few weeks before.
NEWS
May 6, 1999 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Stanley Emil Jacke, 74, of Malvern, a retired executive vice president of SmithKline Beecham, died of cardiac arrest Monday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia. Mr. Jacke worked for the ultrasonic division of SmithKline in Connecticut for 21 years before transferring to Philadelphia. He retired in 1984. After retiring, Mr. Jacke had his own consulting company, Aspen Sonics Inc., in Malvern, where he lived for 18 years. Mr. Jacke held 17 electrical engineering patents and is credited with inventing ultrasonic plastic welding, said his son, Doug.
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