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Blood Brothers

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1998 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
At the climax of Blood Brothers, a man, while pointing at the man standing before him, shouts at his mother: "Why didn't you give me away? I coulda been 'im!" The sentences make perfect sense in context, but even to someone who has not seen the musical, they indicate what kind of show Blood Brothers is. They also provide a way to see what does and doesn't work in the new musical that's concluding the Walnut Street Theatre's season. A mother who gives a child away is a sure sign of melodrama, and Blood Brothers is certainly that.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1993 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Because Willy Russell is an English playwright of some reputation who has written the book, music and lyrics to Blood Brothers, a musical that opened Sunday at the Music Box, he might stir memories of Noel Coward. They should be suppressed. It's not that Russell is without talent. He's the author of the comedies Educating Rita and Shirley Valentine, after all, and Blood Brothers has pleased a lot of people and won several prizes while running for nearly five years in London. For a while, you can understand its appeal.
NEWS
April 10, 2003 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Army unit's insignia depicting a gloved hand and raised saber inside a horseshoe conjures up images of mounted cavalry in the old West. Unit subdivisions have taken names such as Crazy Horse and Apache. And troopers sometimes wear Stetson hats and say "Garryowen" when greeting comrades, referring to the regiment's official tune. The Seventh Cavalry rides again - this time through the streets of Baghdad. It is riding tanks and armored vehicles in the conflict as the Seventh Cav's graying veterans watch the progress from their recliners and couches - cheering it on. "I'm watching too much of it," said Bill Beck, 59, of Camp Hill, Pa., a Vietnam veteran of the Seventh.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2004 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
The irreverent, hard-rocking Rye Coalition is at the North Star Bar tonight, hopefully previewing some of the songs the band's recorded with Dave Grohl for its upcoming - gasp! - major label debut. In the meantime, check out the video on the band's Web site (www.ryecoalition.com) for "Stop Eating While I'm Smoking. " It looks like every high school notebook doodle come to life, complete with evil robots, devils and Wendy O. Williams. The Sinners, the band led by beloved Tritone bartender Paul Dellevigne, opens the show (9 tonight, North Star Bar, 27th and Poplar streets, 215-684-0808, $8, www.northstarbar.
NEWS
February 7, 1995 | by Harriet Lessy, Daily News Staff Writer USA Today and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
You'd think that life would be good for all the beautiful Baldwin boys. But not so, says Billy, younger brother of Alec. Every time he wants to compete for a cool movie role, the name Tom Cruise pops up, he says. "In my age category, there's only Tom Cruise," Baldwin, who was born in '63, told W magazine. "If they don't get Tom Cruise, it's up for grabs for everybody else: Brad Pitt, Keanu Reeves, Billy Baldwin, Matt Dillon, Val Kilmer, or John Cusak. We're all waiting for his leftovers - or maybe smaller pictures that don't have the money or the scope for a Tom Cruise.
NEWS
October 18, 1996 | BY FRANCESCA CHAPMAN Daily News wire services, the New York Daily News and New York Post contributed to this report
We don't doubt for a minute that Fergie, the Duchess Without a Country, will settle in the United States when she finally skulks out of her native Britain. But Oklahoma? "I'm not going to say where I'd live if I moved here. However, I will say that the Midwest gets overlooked. I like what I've seen there," she recently mused to a reporter. This comes on the heels of Fergie's visit to Oklahoma City, where her Chances for Children charity recently donated $150,000 to a pediatric care center.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2002 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
Promising "Sex, Books, and Music," the 215 Festival kicks off tonight at the Free Library of Philadelphia with readings by Zadie Smith, Sarah Vowell, Jeffrey Eugenides, and others (7 p.m., 19th and Vine streets, 215-567-4341, $12), followed by an afterparty at the North Star Bar with Bigger Lovers and Lefty's Deceiver (10 tonight, 27th and Poplar Streets, 215-684-0808, $7). The Philadelphia Independent closes out the weekend with a Sunday afternoon snacktime reading featuring the Walkie Talkies and Candybot, a vengeful, candy-eating, poetry-reading robot (4 p.m., Space 1026, 1026 Arch St., 215-574-7630, free)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1990 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
For a troupe the rumors of whose death were greatly exaggerated, the Philadelphia Theatre Co. is showing remarkable signs of vitality on its road back to solvency. The PTC's indefatigable one-woman show, producing/artistic director Sara Garonzik, has announced a series of new play readings under the company's familiar STAGES banner. The readings will be held June 18, 19 and 20 at Temple University Center City's Stage III, at 1619 Walnut St. "It marks our re-entry into the Philadelphia art scene," says Garonzik, "bringing us one step closer to fulfilling our mission in this year of financial crisis.
NEWS
February 24, 1995 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
GREATEST HITS Bruce Springsteen / Columbia 1/2 Four fresh tracks reuniting Bruce Springsteen with the E Street Band, sound-brightening remasters of some older tracks like "Born to Run" and "The River" and the inclusion of his Grammy-nominated movie theme "Philadelphia" make this greatest-hits package (in stores Tuesday) quite desirable. Besides the single CD and tape packages, a limited-edition two-LP vinyl version also is available. Oozing sentimentality with its "Born to Run"-era cover, vintage pix of Bruce with the band and handwritten notes by the Boss explaining how he came to write songs like "Thunder Road" and "Atlantic City," the whole deal comes off as a musical peace offering.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1993 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
OK, theater buffs, put on your Jeopardy! hats and listen up. The category is Broadway, 1992-93: Answer: Fool Moon, Redwood Curtain, Solitary Confinement, Chinese Coffee. Stumped? Here's a hint: The 1992-93 Tony Awards, honoring the best in Broadway achievement, will be presented tonight at 9 p.m. at the Gershwin Theatre in New York. The ceremony, hosted by Liza Minnelli, will be telecast live on CBS (Channel 10). All right, time's up. Question: What were the only productions not nominated for the '92-'93 Tony as the season's best new play?
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NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
TORONTO - Colin Farrell and Martin McDonagh are like blood brothers, really. Irishmen of similar age (the actor is 36, the playwright and filmmaker, 42) and similar sensibilities (quick, jolly, sarcastic), they haven't sliced their thumbs open and let the blood pass between them, like fierce friends in an old movie. (At least, they're not telling anybody if they did.) But they have been responsible for gushing founts of fake blood in the two projects they've made together: 2008's inspired hit-men-in-hiding dark comedy, In Bruges, and Friday's Hollywood-underbelly screwball caper, Seven Psychopaths . Especially in Seven Psychopaths - in which Farrell stars as a screenwriter unwittingly caught up in a dog abduction scam that engenders the wrath of a shih tzu-loving local crime boss - the exploding heads, exploding limbs, and exploding Buicks are everywhere, achieving a kind of Peckinpah -esque crescendo of carnage.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2004 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
The irreverent, hard-rocking Rye Coalition is at the North Star Bar tonight, hopefully previewing some of the songs the band's recorded with Dave Grohl for its upcoming - gasp! - major label debut. In the meantime, check out the video on the band's Web site (www.ryecoalition.com) for "Stop Eating While I'm Smoking. " It looks like every high school notebook doodle come to life, complete with evil robots, devils and Wendy O. Williams. The Sinners, the band led by beloved Tritone bartender Paul Dellevigne, opens the show (9 tonight, North Star Bar, 27th and Poplar streets, 215-684-0808, $8, www.northstarbar.
NEWS
April 10, 2003 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Army unit's insignia depicting a gloved hand and raised saber inside a horseshoe conjures up images of mounted cavalry in the old West. Unit subdivisions have taken names such as Crazy Horse and Apache. And troopers sometimes wear Stetson hats and say "Garryowen" when greeting comrades, referring to the regiment's official tune. The Seventh Cavalry rides again - this time through the streets of Baghdad. It is riding tanks and armored vehicles in the conflict as the Seventh Cav's graying veterans watch the progress from their recliners and couches - cheering it on. "I'm watching too much of it," said Bill Beck, 59, of Camp Hill, Pa., a Vietnam veteran of the Seventh.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2002 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
Promising "Sex, Books, and Music," the 215 Festival kicks off tonight at the Free Library of Philadelphia with readings by Zadie Smith, Sarah Vowell, Jeffrey Eugenides, and others (7 p.m., 19th and Vine streets, 215-567-4341, $12), followed by an afterparty at the North Star Bar with Bigger Lovers and Lefty's Deceiver (10 tonight, 27th and Poplar Streets, 215-684-0808, $7). The Philadelphia Independent closes out the weekend with a Sunday afternoon snacktime reading featuring the Walkie Talkies and Candybot, a vengeful, candy-eating, poetry-reading robot (4 p.m., Space 1026, 1026 Arch St., 215-574-7630, free)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2001 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Most of our fathers and grandfathers who were in the fighting don't talk much about World War II. Now television shows us why. HBO tonight premieres the much-awaited, highly hyped Band of Brothers, the World War II movie to end all World War II movies - and not because of its transcendent drama, intense characters, or uplifting depictions of valiant heroism. It has almost none of that sort of thing. Band of Brothers is likely to put the World War II genre to an end because of its authenticity.
NEWS
January 22, 1999 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Just because she's playing a woman who lives in the past is no reason to presume Petula Clark does likewise. "I'm very much of the moment," said the singer/actress now embodying the role of silent screen star Norma Desmond in the kinder, gentler touring production of "Sunset Boulevard" ensconced at the Merriam Theater. "Truth is, I'm hopeless with dates, with anything that has to do with numbers. And I'm not a bit nostalgic, don't much care for dwelling in the past. " Yet it's equally clear that Clark is bringing a lot of herself to the role of Norma Desmond in Susan L. Schulman's new staging of the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical, as Clark previously did helming the "flagship" production in London's West End directed by Trevor Nunn.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1998 | By Jack Lloyd, FOR THE INQUIRER
'I had a career before 'Downtown,' and I've had a career after 'Downtown.' A lot of people don't seem to realize that. " So says Petula Clark. And a lot of those people she speaks of are in the United States. They remember the British singer for her hit records in the '60s - in addition to "Downtown," there were "I Know a Place," "Don't Sleep In the Subway," "I Couldn't Live Without Your Love," and "This Is My Song" - and her movies, including Finian's Rainbow with the late Fred Astaire and Goodbye Mr. Chips, in which she costarred with Peter O'Toole.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1998 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
At the climax of Blood Brothers, a man, while pointing at the man standing before him, shouts at his mother: "Why didn't you give me away? I coulda been 'im!" The sentences make perfect sense in context, but even to someone who has not seen the musical, they indicate what kind of show Blood Brothers is. They also provide a way to see what does and doesn't work in the new musical that's concluding the Walnut Street Theatre's season. A mother who gives a child away is a sure sign of melodrama, and Blood Brothers is certainly that.
NEWS
October 18, 1996 | BY FRANCESCA CHAPMAN Daily News wire services, the New York Daily News and New York Post contributed to this report
We don't doubt for a minute that Fergie, the Duchess Without a Country, will settle in the United States when she finally skulks out of her native Britain. But Oklahoma? "I'm not going to say where I'd live if I moved here. However, I will say that the Midwest gets overlooked. I like what I've seen there," she recently mused to a reporter. This comes on the heels of Fergie's visit to Oklahoma City, where her Chances for Children charity recently donated $150,000 to a pediatric care center.
NEWS
February 24, 1995 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
GREATEST HITS Bruce Springsteen / Columbia 1/2 Four fresh tracks reuniting Bruce Springsteen with the E Street Band, sound-brightening remasters of some older tracks like "Born to Run" and "The River" and the inclusion of his Grammy-nominated movie theme "Philadelphia" make this greatest-hits package (in stores Tuesday) quite desirable. Besides the single CD and tape packages, a limited-edition two-LP vinyl version also is available. Oozing sentimentality with its "Born to Run"-era cover, vintage pix of Bruce with the band and handwritten notes by the Boss explaining how he came to write songs like "Thunder Road" and "Atlantic City," the whole deal comes off as a musical peace offering.
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