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Blood Cancer

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NEWS
February 5, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
In a new approach to fighting cancer, doctors say they have used ultraviolet light to activate a powerful drug in the bloodstream and apparently vaccinate cancer victims against their own disease. The technique, described in today's New England Journal of Medicine, has produced remarkable remissions in some people, suffering a relentlessly fatal form of blood cancer, who had not responded to ordinary treatment. The therapy - which was tested at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City and at the medical centers at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of California at San Francisco, the University of Vienna and the University of Dusseldorf - appears to marshal the body's own immune defenses to zero in on cancer and destroy it. It seems to do this without causing nausea, hair loss or any of the other common side-effects of chemotherapy or radiation.
NEWS
December 26, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: Can you explain acute myelogenous leukemia? Someone we know was recently diagnosed with it, and two weeks later he was dead. What makes it so deadly? Answer: Acute myelogenous leukemia, or AML, is a cancer of the blood in which immature, abnormal white blood cells grow rapidly and uncontrollably in the bone marrow and interfere with its ability to produce red blood cells, healthy white blood cells, and platelets. It's a fairly rare cancer, with men affected more often than women.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
One of the biggest challenges for the companies now racing to develop T-cell therapies for cancer is figuring out how to make personalized, living products on an assembly-line scale. Each patient's own T-cells - the soldiers of the immune system - must be siphoned from the blood, coaxed to multiply, genetically engineered to recognize and attack cancer cells, then returned to the patient. Now, Cellectis, a French biotechnology company partnering with Pfizer, says it has used gene-editing technology to achieve a major advance: a "universal" T-cell product, made with healthy donor cells and used "off-the-shelf.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Shares of Merck rose Thursday after the drugmaker said its Keytruda immuno-oncology medicine succeeded in a study of patients with advanced lung cancer and showed a survival advantage over patients given standard chemotherapy. Based on the results, an independent data monitoring board recommended that the clinical trial be stopped and that patients receiving chemotherapy be allowed to switch to the company's treatment. Merck, based in Kenilworth, N.J., employs about 9,200 in West Point and Upper Gwynedd in Montgomery County.
NEWS
July 10, 2016
On June 10, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) hosted its grand finale to its fund-raising competition with the announcement of the 2016 Man and Woman of the Year. The Eastern Pa. chapter of LLS, the world's largest voluntary health agency dedicated to finding cures for blood cancer, set a goal of raising $500,000 in the competition, which started March 29. About 400 attended the event at the Loews Philadelphia Hotel. The $384,000 in proceeds will go toward finding a cure for leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, and myeloma.
NEWS
September 8, 2012
Former U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter, who announced Aug. 28 that he was again battling cancer, was released Friday from the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, his family said. Specter, 82, was expected to return to the hospital periodically for additional treatment of non-Hodgkins lymphoma, a brief announcement said. Specter, who first was elected in 1980, has had repeated medical troubles, starting with a benign brain tumor diagnosed in 1993. He had radiation treatments in 1996 and a heart bypass operation in 1998.
NEWS
March 20, 2016
The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) drew more than 600 to its Red & White Ball at the Marriott Downtown Philadelphia on March 12. Supporters enjoyed an evening that included a silent auction, cocktails and hors d'oeuvres, dinner, and dancing, all for a great cause. LLS is the world's largest voluntary health agency dedicated to blood cancer. The mission of LLS is to support cancer research to seek treatments and cures for leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, and myeloma. The event brought in a record- breaking $570,000, bringing the total to $1.4 million raised over the last three years by the Red & White Ball.
NEWS
March 6, 2009 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scientists would receive $5.5 million to study a first-of-its-kind cancer cluster in Northeastern Pennsylvania under a provision inserted by Sen. Arlen Specter in the federal spending bill moving through Congress. The cluster is potentially linked to environmental hazards. Under the $410 billion federal spending bill moving through Congress, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention would receive $5 million to study cases of polycythemia vera (PV), a rare blood cancer that turned up in unusually high numbers in an area 80 miles northwest of Philadelphia, said Specter (R., Pa.)
SPORTS
April 16, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
STATWISE, IT was the greatest day Adam DiMichele ever had. The former Temple quarterback, now the Owls' wide receivers coach, helped sign up 225 people for the "Be the Match" bone marrow registry yesterday. The program, operated by the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP), helps find matches for those in need. According to the NMDP website, a person is diagnosed with a blood cancer every 4 minutes. And, every 10 minutes, someone dies from a blood cancer. Each year, thousands with blood cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma are cured.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 10, 2016
On June 10, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) hosted its grand finale to its fund-raising competition with the announcement of the 2016 Man and Woman of the Year. The Eastern Pa. chapter of LLS, the world's largest voluntary health agency dedicated to finding cures for blood cancer, set a goal of raising $500,000 in the competition, which started March 29. About 400 attended the event at the Loews Philadelphia Hotel. The $384,000 in proceeds will go toward finding a cure for leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, and myeloma.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Shares of Merck rose Thursday after the drugmaker said its Keytruda immuno-oncology medicine succeeded in a study of patients with advanced lung cancer and showed a survival advantage over patients given standard chemotherapy. Based on the results, an independent data monitoring board recommended that the clinical trial be stopped and that patients receiving chemotherapy be allowed to switch to the company's treatment. Merck, based in Kenilworth, N.J., employs about 9,200 in West Point and Upper Gwynedd in Montgomery County.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Celator Pharmaceuticals in Ewing Township near Trenton has agreed to be acquired by Ireland-based Jazz Pharmaceuticals for about $1.5 billion in cash. Celator's shares surged more than 70 percent Tuesday after the announcement, to close at $30.08, up $12.55. The company has an experimental treatment for a rare blood cancer. Celator announced in March positive results in a late-stage trial for Vyxeos, which showed "statistically significant" overall survival rates in patients with acute myeloid leukemia, a cancer of the blood and bone marrow.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
One of the biggest challenges for the companies now racing to develop T-cell therapies for cancer is figuring out how to make personalized, living products on an assembly-line scale. Each patient's own T-cells - the soldiers of the immune system - must be siphoned from the blood, coaxed to multiply, genetically engineered to recognize and attack cancer cells, then returned to the patient. Now, Cellectis, a French biotechnology company partnering with Pfizer, says it has used gene-editing technology to achieve a major advance: a "universal" T-cell product, made with healthy donor cells and used "off-the-shelf.
NEWS
April 20, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
Merck & Co. said Mondaythe Food and Drug Administration has granted "breakthrough therapy designation" for its Keytruda medicine to treat relapsed classical Hodgkin lymphoma, a blood cancer. The company said the designation, intended to expedite the development and review of drugs that treat serious or life-threatening diseases or conditions, is the fourth "breakthrough therapy" status for Keytruda, a humanized monoclonal antibody that works by increasing the ability of the body's immune system to help detect and fight tumor cells.
NEWS
March 20, 2016
The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) drew more than 600 to its Red & White Ball at the Marriott Downtown Philadelphia on March 12. Supporters enjoyed an evening that included a silent auction, cocktails and hors d'oeuvres, dinner, and dancing, all for a great cause. LLS is the world's largest voluntary health agency dedicated to blood cancer. The mission of LLS is to support cancer research to seek treatments and cures for leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, and myeloma. The event brought in a record- breaking $570,000, bringing the total to $1.4 million raised over the last three years by the Red & White Ball.
NEWS
September 8, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four years ago, University of Pennsylvania researchers published early but electrifying results. An experimental T-cell therapy eradicated end-stage leukemia in two patients, and put a third in remission. Soon after that, pharmaceutical giant Novartis partnered with Penn, aiming to commercialize the breakthrough. Since then, a more modest picture of success has emerged in treating the blood cancer, a type called chronic lymphocytic leukemia that usually strikes in middle age or later.
NEWS
August 14, 2015
D EAR ABBY: I'm writing in response to "Not Talking About the Future," whose wife has breast cancer, was told she has only a few years to live and feels sad when her kids talk about their futures. My dad was diagnosed with stage four multiple myeloma, a type of blood cancer, in 2006. He was told that even the most aggressive treatment would buy him only two or three more years. Well, he's now working on year nine. While I must admit that it's been hard at times for me to stay positive about his prognosis, I try not to let it show.
NEWS
April 8, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The breakthrough cancer immunotherapy being developed by the University of Pennsylvania and Novartis Pharmaceuticals can now move ahead without the cloud of a patent lawsuit. Novartis on Monday agreed to settle that long-running fight by paying $12.25 million now - and more in the future - to Juno Therapeutics, a well-funded biotech start-up that is also working on therapies designed to harness the immune system to beat cancer. Juno will share some of the payments with St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, which launched the legal battle in 2012, claiming Penn effectively stole key technology that the esteemed Memphis hospital had invented.
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