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Blood Cells

SPORTS
March 11, 2000 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roger Neilson's bone marrow transplant was termed a success yesterday at Hahnemann University Hospital. The Flyers' coach now enters the most dangerous period in his recovery from multiple myeloma, or bone marrow cancer. "The next five to seven days are a really critical period for Roger," said Isadore Brodsky, Hahnemann's chief of hematology oncology, who did the procedure. "A lot of places don't isolate their patients, but we do. We've never lost someone after a transplant. But Roger is 65, and I don't want to take any chances.
NEWS
October 18, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gayle Levick Goldglantz, 62, of Elkins Park, a medical-practice manager who endured four kidney transplants in a history-making fight for life, died of cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse on Sunday, Oct. 16, the day before her 40th wedding anniversary. Mrs. Goldglantz discovered she had kidney disease after a blood test for her marriage license in 1971. "The doctors told us we would have a very bleak future," her husband, Harvey, later told The Inquirer. In 1976 and 1977, Mrs. Goldglantz had two kidney transplants from cadavers; the organs were rejected after one month and one week.
NEWS
May 2, 2012 | Mike Vitez
The Inquirer is presenting one profile a day of participants in Sunday's Blue Cross Broad Street Run. See full coverage at www.philly.com/broadstreetrun. By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER In 2009, in his Chester County kitchen, Tom Kramer turned frustration and desperation into inspiration. He would turn what he loved — running, training — into a cause that could save the life of his wife, Pam, and the lives of many like her. Pam has a rare form of blood cancer, myelofibrosis, that eats away at her bone marrow and will eventually be fatal.
NEWS
July 21, 2003 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1988 in Paris, a boy with a life-threatening form of anemia was saved by a new, experimental therapy - a few ounces of blood from his newborn sister's umbilical cord. Soon, what had been just a waste product of childbirth was being hailed as a therapeutic miracle. Facilities for freezing and storing umbilical cord blood began to spring up around the world. Now, 15 years after that first "cord blood transplant," it is clear the procedure has several advantages over a bone marrow transplant, the older, more common way of rebuilding damaged blood and immune systems.
NEWS
October 29, 1990 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Researchers in Philadelphia are among a team of scientists experimenting with a drug that is proving successful in treatment of sickle cell anemia, a debilitating blood disease that affects 1 in 500 black people. The drug is hydroxyurea, which has been used for about 15 years to treat chronic leukemia and other blood disorders. Now, it is being administered in preliminary trials to a handful of those who have "crises" associated with sickle cell anemia, painful bouts of throbbing pain that sometimes put the sufferer in the hospital.
NEWS
February 21, 1992 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
JUST THE FACTS Health hazards you may never have considered: Twice as many shy college students as bolder types have hay fever, Men's Health magazine reports. About 85 percent of men get athlete's foot between the ages of 13 and 40. And to deal with health problems, according to a poll of 500 Americans, 6 percent have tried acupuncture and 2 percent have been to a faith healer. CANCER TREATMENT Good news on cancer: Daily doses of the drug cisplatin, combined with radiation, seem to increase the survival of patients with inoperable non- small-cell lung cancer.
NEWS
June 17, 1988 | Marc Schogol and includes reports from Family Circle magazine and Inquirer wire services
MISCARRIAGE PREVENTION. Some women who had suffered repeated miscarriages gave birth after being injected with blood cells from their husbands, an experimental treatment that might help 50,000 U.S. women. The treatment overcame an immune-system abnormality that had produced up to 11 consecutive miscarriages, says immunologist James Mowbray of St. Mary's Hospital in London. Treatment for such women also is offered at Philadelphia's Jefferson Medical College. SPIDER-VEIN TREATMENT.
BUSINESS
March 26, 1992 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
What does it take to succeed in a biotechnology company? Patience, says George L. Bird Jr., chairman and majority owner of Gen Trak Inc. in Plymouth Meeting. "Biotech" is today what "plastics" was to an earlier generation - the shorthand word for an industry a lot of people think has a big future. Biotech covers a multitude of companies that deal quite literally with blood and guts - and all the cells and DNA (the genetic code in cells) therein. Gen Trak's piece of this action is a group of blood cell products using HLA - human leukocyte antigens - for tissue matching and diagnosis.
NEWS
October 13, 1992 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
When listeners of Ken Garland's morning show at WPEN (950-AM) yesterday were told that the 39-year radio veteran would forgo the magazine trivia segment, they knew something was up. And as Garland, 65, began struggling to explain the switching of the gears, the quaver in his voice confirmed their worst fears. "This is tough!" Garland said, pounding his fist on a table. "I'm giving it up, folks. " Broadcasting live from Eli's Pier 34, Garland yesterday announced to his radio audience and about 200 fans on hand that he has chronic leukemia.
NEWS
March 11, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Still groggy from painkillers, Maddie Major, 7, clutched her stuffed Pooh Bear and laid her head on her father's shoulder as he carried her to the hospital cafeteria. Maddie, dad Tim, mom Robyn, and big sister Candace spent that February morning at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, where a doctor extracted samples of the child's spinal fluid and bone marrow. In a few days, the biopsies would reveal whether Maddie's leukemia had been wiped out by an experimental gene therapy made from her own white blood cells - crucial disease fighters called T cells.
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