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Blood Cells

SPORTS
May 11, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Within hours of helping the Colorado Avalanche advance to the Western Conference finals, Peter Forsberg walked into his favorite postgame hangout intent on enjoying a subdued celebration. As he strode through the trendy restaurant, Forsberg spotted Avalanche general manager Pierre Lacroix and team owner Stan Kroenke and told them he had a strange feeling in his stomach. About 30 minutes later, Forsberg's late-night plans changed drastically. He was heading for the emergency room, where tests revealed a ruptured spleen and internal bleeding that required surgery.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Botanical imagery has become a prime source of subject matter for a number of artists. For immediate confirmation, check out the exhibition called "Plant Life" at both locations of the Schmidt/Dean Gallery (through tomorrow) or the current Challenge show at the Fleisher Art Memorial. Two Fleisher artists, Rain Harris and Charlotte R. Yudis, draw extensively on plant forms, which coincidentally makes their contributions perfectly complementary. Harris is represented by two bodies of ceramic work, small objects in porcelain and larger ones in stoneware.
NEWS
April 7, 2000 | By Melia Bowie, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
America's future scientists were getting antsy - at least the 922 of them participating in this week's 52d Delaware Valley Science Fair were. Amid the organized chaos of vibrantly colored display boards and loud, echoing conversation inside the Fort Washington Expo Center, groups of teenage boys stood loosening their ties and young girls slipped in and out of now-painful pumps before plunking down in seats beside their exhibits. "It's about that time," said Henry Disston, president and director of the science fair, as he glanced at the scene outside his cramped office at the center.
SPORTS
March 11, 2000 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roger Neilson's bone marrow transplant was termed a success yesterday at Hahnemann University Hospital. The Flyers' coach now enters the most dangerous period in his recovery from multiple myeloma, or bone marrow cancer. "The next five to seven days are a really critical period for Roger," said Isadore Brodsky, Hahnemann's chief of hematology oncology, who did the procedure. "A lot of places don't isolate their patients, but we do. We've never lost someone after a transplant. But Roger is 65, and I don't want to take any chances.
NEWS
March 1, 2000 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a medical advance that could end painful finger pricks for the seven million diabetics who do them every day, researchers have extracted blood sugar right through the skin, without needles. The technique uses ultrasound to open microscopic spaces in the skin through which a tiny bit of fluid can escape. The fluid is then analyzed to determine glucose, or sugar, levels in the blood. The method, which was successfully tested on seven diabetics, is reported in the current issue of the journal Nature Medicine.
NEWS
November 11, 1999 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seven hospitals in the Philadelphia region have embraced an American Red Cross goal of providing all patients with an improved blood product. The so-called leukocyte-reduced blood has been stripped of white blood cells, which can lead to fever and other complications for patients receiving transfusions. Area facilities that have switched to the refined blood product include Chester County Hospital, Hahnemann University Hospital, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, Holy Redeemer Hospital in Meadowbrook, Underwood-Memorial Hospital in Woodbury, and the Deborah Heart and Lung Center in Browns Mills, according to Susan Sponar, spokeswoman for the American Red Cross Penn-Jersey Region.
NEWS
April 17, 1998 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They're critical building blocks of the body. They can restore a damaged blood-forming system and create the white and red blood cells and platelets that help the body heal, carry oxygen to tissues and fight off infections. They may be the key to treating leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, lymphoma and Fanconi's anemia. But the usual source of the so-called stem cells has been the bone marrow - and obtaining them requires expensive bone-marrow transplants, an exact donor match, and willing donors for a painful operation.
NEWS
December 2, 1997 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Donald Squire arrived at Allegheny University Hospitals/Graduate, ready for the usual fight. For a Jehovah's Witness like Squire, serious illnesses are often complicated by battles with doctors. The Witnesses refuse to accept blood transfusions - even transfusions of their own blood. A doctor near Squire's home, in Phillipsburg, N.J., had made it clear she was reluctant to treat his cancer, fearing that he would die without a transfusion after chemotherapy. Squire had heard that Graduate, in Center City, a two-hour drive from his home, might be more comfortable treating him, but he was still expecting resistance.
SPORTS
August 8, 1997 | by Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Writer
Jeremy Ilaoa always has weighed less than his fraternal twin, Jason, but never this much less. The way Jeremy sees things, it's better to be lighter than dead. Jeremy used to carry 215 pounds on his 6-2 frame, compared to Jason's 240. That was a fine weight for a 17-year-old junior playing strong safety for the high school football team in Walla Walla, Wash. Jason played defensive end and tight end. Now, Jeremy's down to 195. And he's happy about it, pacing the sidelines at Eagles training camp, the sun bouncing off his Eagles cap worn backward as he follows his host, Irving Fryar, with his soft brown eyes.
LIVING
May 12, 1997 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a neonatologist, Vinod Bhutani had taken blood from the heels of countless newborn babies. It wasn't pleasant watching their tiny fists clench and enduring their shrill, piercing cries. But he accepted their protests as the price of making sure they were healthy. He was surprised at how different things looked after his own daughter was born seven years ago. She was jaundiced: her skin looked unusually yellow. That is not uncommon in babies, but, in some cases, it can be a sign of metabolic problems serious enough to cause retardation and other neurological impairment if not treated.
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