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Blood Cells

NEWS
February 26, 1997 | By Claude Lewis
Scientific researchers may soon revolutionize blood transfusions by chemically converting types A and B red blood cells to the universal type O. The conversion would allow any unit of blood cells to be transfused into most patients, removing the need to match specific blood types. If the new conversion process, which eliminates the "extra" molecule that determines blood type, holds up after additional clinical trials and testing, it may represent the most significant development in modern blood science.
NEWS
October 31, 1996 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the first time, scientists have demonstrated that it may be possible to restore the frayed immune systems of people who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, which causes AIDS. In an important new study, scientists at the National Institutes of Health have found that a human protein known as interleukin-2 can prompt large and sustained increases in the infection-fighting white blood cells that are destroyed by HIV. Without these cells, people with HIV are prey to secondary infections such as pneumonia, which eventually kill them.
NEWS
June 20, 1996 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Researchers have taken a major step in unraveling the mystery of how the AIDS virus infects human cells. In a flurry of new studies being rushed into scientific journals, five teams of scientists, including one at the University of Pennsylvania, have identified a protein on the surface of white blood cells that provides a portal for the virus to enter. The Penn team has identified two additional receptors that also provide gateways for HIV, which causes AIDS. The findings, reported in three journals beginning today, significantly advance knowledge about the complex biology of HIV. The studies also open up a new avenue for AIDS research that scientists hope will lead to new classes of drugs to treat HIV infection.
NEWS
August 15, 1995 | By Edward A. Robinson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A toxicologist testified yesterday that he could say "with a reasonable degree of scientific certainty" that a Cochranville man was drunk on the morning his van collided with a car, killing the driver. Testifying for the prosecution, John J. Spikes defended the effectiveness of blood tests that showed Gary D. Moore, 24, had a blood-alcohol level of 0.12 percent when he collided with the car driven by Larry Declue on the snowy morning of Jan. 20, 1990. Declue, a 51-year-old Arizona native, died at the scene of the wreck.
NEWS
June 12, 1995 | By Judy Baehr, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
On Wednesday, Haddonfield Police Cpl. George Ames will do for a second time something very few people get a chance to do even once. He will try his best to save a life. Ames will enter Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia, where his bone marrow will be harvested for transplant into a patient with leukemia. The recipient this time will be a 46-year-old man. Three years ago, it was a 36- year-old man. In 1992, Ames was notified that a National Marrow Donor Program search had discovered that he was a perfect match for someone with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)
NEWS
January 15, 1995 | By Alison Fitzgerald, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Joe Cerasi got married in September 1993, he probably already had the disease. The first symptoms showed up around then - he had lost weight, he was pale - but they could all be explained away. "My diet had changed drastically when I got married - you know, a lot of vegetables instead of fast food. I assumed that was a lot of the reason for the weight loss," he said. "By Christmas, people were saying I was whittling away, but I thought, 'A new wife, a new house, that's a lot of stress.
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After tracking 4,000 patients with sickle cell disease for a decade, researchers have finally brought a message of hope for tens of thousands of people with the painful disease: Just hang in there. Their study shows that people with sickle cell disease are living well into their 40s - twice as long as doctors had assumed. The extra window of life is more than a morale booster for patients. Studying them also has helped explain why some people live longer. "Most (sickle cell patients)
NEWS
November 28, 1993 | By Paul J. Lim, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
This week, seven new plays - the works of the winners in the Philadelphia Young Playwrights Festival - will be performed at Temple University's Tomlinson Theater. Three were written by students from Cheltenham. David Stamm, Rachael Samberg and Dana Kraviz won top honors this year in the festival, a regional competition for junior and senior high school students. And their reward is having their writings brought to life. They have found that to be a mixed blessing. For the last month, they have watched as experienced directors attempted to transform their words into living, breathing works of art. They've gotten advice from the Temple drama students who are serving as performers.
NEWS
October 13, 1992 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
When listeners of Ken Garland's morning show at WPEN (950-AM) yesterday were told that the 39-year radio veteran would forgo the magazine trivia segment, they knew something was up. And as Garland, 65, began struggling to explain the switching of the gears, the quaver in his voice confirmed their worst fears. "This is tough!" Garland said, pounding his fist on a table. "I'm giving it up, folks. " Broadcasting live from Eli's Pier 34, Garland yesterday announced to his radio audience and about 200 fans on hand that he has chronic leukemia.
NEWS
September 9, 1992 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
Q: Are there either vitamins or foods I can consume to help me from bruising so easily? I'm active and fair-skinned and seem to have bruises all the time. A: There are many causes of bruising, some of which are trivial, others not. For example, because of thinning of the skin, elderly people bruise easily, as do those of any age who take aspirin and related drugs, which can interfere with blood clotting. On the other hand, bruising is often the first sign of a coagulation abnormality, such as seen in leukemia, lymphoma, AIDS and other serious diseases.
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