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Blood Disorder

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SPORTS
March 14, 2001 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Hakeem Olajuwon, who led the Houston Rockets to a pair of NBA titles over a 17-year career and became the league's all-time shot-blocker, is suffering from a blood condition that may have ended his stellar career with the team. The Rockets yesterday announced that Olajuwon has a blood problem in a vein in the lower half of his left leg and will require medication that will keep him off the court for three to six months. The fear is that taking a drug called coumadin, a blood thinner, could result in a more serious internal injury if he had hard contact while on the court.
NEWS
May 16, 2005 | From Daily News wire services
Supporters of gay Catholics denied communion in Minn. A Roman Catholic priest denied communion to more than 100 people at the Cathedral of St. Paul in St. Paul, Minn., yesterday, saying they could not receive the sacrament because they wore rainbow-colored sashes to church to show support for gay Catholics. Since 2001, the Rainbow Sash Alliance has encouraged supporters to wear the multicolored fabric bands on each Pentecost Sunday, but this was the first time they had been denied communion.
NEWS
August 19, 1987 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
For weeks after her daughter, Courtney, died in a boating accident, Betty Brooks said, a deep depression made her unable to cope with the simplest tasks. "But as much as I wanted to grieve, I realized the only way to go on living was to dig my way back by helping others," said Brooks, 38, a lifelong Cumberland County resident. Her way of digging back has been to raise money to fight sickle-cell anemia. And she and her husband, Willie, 39, have been raising money since the drowning death of her daughter two years ago. Even though no one in their families has sickle-cell anemia, a hereditary blood disorder affecting mostly black Americans, the two Millville residents have launched their own drive to raise money to combat the often-deadly disease that affects more than a quarter-million children nationwide.
SPORTS
February 16, 1992 | By Marc Narducci, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
He has participated very little during practice lately and doesn't even partake in the pregame drills. But once the game begins, nobody would ever suspect that there was anything physically wrong with Cherry Hill East High guard Adam Schwartz. The 6-foot senior has a rare blood disorder that weakens him considerably. For the last week, he has been basically limited to game action. However, while he is struggling physically, his game has yet to suffer. Yesterday, Schwartz scored 25 points as host Cherry Hill East defeated Sterling, 68-56, in a nonleague game.
NEWS
June 25, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
THE BOTTOM LINE Women, now there's an alternative to your third-string underwear. You know, those old pairs saved to wear during menstrual periods. Tanya Allen of Detroit has invented a disposable underwear. Made of a polyester and rayon blend, Allen's Toujours Frais undies (the name is French for "always fresh") are 85 percent biodegradable. Distributed by Allen's Forever Fresh company, they sell for about $1 apiece. FULL DISCLOSURE As far as most of you are concerned, there's no argument: Ninety percent of Americans believe health-care professionals should be required to tell their patients if they are infected with AIDS, according to a Gallup poll taken for Newsweek.
SPORTS
May 5, 1998 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Among the many qualities that make Haverford School's Mike Cunningham special is an upbeat approach to his continuing battle against cancer. "The doctors don't say I'm cured, but I say I am," he said. Cunningham, 46, has been named the first recipient of the Michael F. Mayock Distinguished Teacher-Coach Award. Mayock, who retired from teaching in June 1996, coached football at Malvern Prep (1956-62) and Haverford School (1970-76, 1983-87) and was respected throughout the area for his knowledge and demeanor.
NEWS
April 11, 1997 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Gloria Campisi contributed to this report
Joseph D. D'Angelo, a restaurant owner and youth sports coach from Roxborough, died Tuesday of cancer. He was 37. A popular, well-loved man in his neighborhood, D'Angelo overcame a crippling blood disorder as a boy and went on to play football in high school and college. When he was diagnosed with cancer last August, D'Angelo remained optimistic. "He was a fighter," said his wife, Patricia. "He was making plans a week before he died about going on a cruise. " News of his death brought silence to the normally raucous lunchroom at Holy Family School, where nearly every child knew D'Angelo through his coaching and volunteering.
NEWS
December 11, 1991 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
Q: What is the cause of sleepwalking? Who does it usually affect? What are some of the symptoms. And is there a cure for this condition? A: Sleepwalking (somnambulism) is a poorly understood and relatively rare disorder, most common in children and marked by the performance of complex acts during what appears to be deep sleep. The patient seems to be out of contact with the environment while experiencing a vivid, hallucinatory drama. The eyes are usually open and the patient may mumble repetitiously, walk about and engage in a variety of activities.
SPORTS
September 20, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his first public comments since blood clots were diagnosed in his lungs and right calf in early August, Flyers defenseman Kimmo Timonen admitted that his career is hanging by a thread. "My desire is that I want to play, but the chance of me playing is really slim. That's the fact," Timonen said at a hastily called news conference Thursday at the Flyers' training facility in Voorhees. Timonen, 39, who had planned for 2014-15 to be his 16th and final season, said that he has seen several doctors since his diagnosis and that the blood clots have not gone away.
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SPORTS
February 9, 2015 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
KIMMO TIMONEN shook his head as he unlaced his skates yesterday, still sweating after ending his longest on-ice absence since he started playing hockey at age 7 in Finland. "I saw a couple articles where people say crazy things," Timonen said. "People who don't know what they're talking about saying I'm going to bleed out on the ice if I get cut. " Words dripping with sarcasm, he added, "Good image for my family. " Timonen took the first stride toward resuming his career yesterday - on blood-thinning medications, with a blood disorder, a month shy of his 40th birthday - with one message in mind.
SPORTS
January 31, 2015 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 90 minutes after Flyers coach Craig Berube strongly implied that veteran defenseman Kimmo Timonen was going to play this season, general manager Ron Hextall called an impromptu news conference Thursday night and explained that a decision was still in the works. "I just want to clarify that there has been no definitive decision on Kimmo coming back," Hextall said. "There's still a process going on. " Timonen, 39, has missed the season because of blood clots in his lungs and leg. The clots in his lung have cleared, the Flyers said.
SPORTS
September 20, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his first public comments since blood clots were diagnosed in his lungs and right calf in early August, Flyers defenseman Kimmo Timonen admitted that his career is hanging by a thread. "My desire is that I want to play, but the chance of me playing is really slim. That's the fact," Timonen said at a hastily called news conference Thursday at the Flyers' training facility in Voorhees. Timonen, 39, who had planned for 2014-15 to be his 16th and final season, said that he has seen several doctors since his diagnosis and that the blood clots have not gone away.
SPORTS
May 27, 2009 | By Don McKee INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Holmgren was in Toronto yesterday on a scouting trip when he heard the heartrending news that popular former Flyer Peter Zezel lay near death at a hospital in the city. "The last time I talked to him, I knew something was really wrong," the Flyers' general manager said. "But still, the news today is really tragic. For a young man . . . " About an hour after Holmgren spoke with The Inquirer, Mr. Zezel's death was announced. He was 44. According to Toronto newspapers and the Associated Press, nearly 10 years ago, Mr. Zezel was found to have a rare blood disorder called hemolytic anemia.
NEWS
May 16, 2005 | From Daily News wire services
Supporters of gay Catholics denied communion in Minn. A Roman Catholic priest denied communion to more than 100 people at the Cathedral of St. Paul in St. Paul, Minn., yesterday, saying they could not receive the sacrament because they wore rainbow-colored sashes to church to show support for gay Catholics. Since 2001, the Rainbow Sash Alliance has encouraged supporters to wear the multicolored fabric bands on each Pentecost Sunday, but this was the first time they had been denied communion.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2004 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Centocor Inc., based in Horsham, has warned doctors that some patients taking its rheumatoid arthritis drug Remicade developed fatal blood and central nervous system disorders. Centocor, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, said in an Aug. 11 letter to health-care professionals that it was revising Remicade's label to advise that patients who develop symptoms of a blood disorder or infection, including persistent fever, should discontinue treatment and seek medical help immediately.
SPORTS
March 14, 2001 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Hakeem Olajuwon, who led the Houston Rockets to a pair of NBA titles over a 17-year career and became the league's all-time shot-blocker, is suffering from a blood condition that may have ended his stellar career with the team. The Rockets yesterday announced that Olajuwon has a blood problem in a vein in the lower half of his left leg and will require medication that will keep him off the court for three to six months. The fear is that taking a drug called coumadin, a blood thinner, could result in a more serious internal injury if he had hard contact while on the court.
SPORTS
May 5, 1998 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Among the many qualities that make Haverford School's Mike Cunningham special is an upbeat approach to his continuing battle against cancer. "The doctors don't say I'm cured, but I say I am," he said. Cunningham, 46, has been named the first recipient of the Michael F. Mayock Distinguished Teacher-Coach Award. Mayock, who retired from teaching in June 1996, coached football at Malvern Prep (1956-62) and Haverford School (1970-76, 1983-87) and was respected throughout the area for his knowledge and demeanor.
NEWS
April 11, 1997 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Gloria Campisi contributed to this report
Joseph D. D'Angelo, a restaurant owner and youth sports coach from Roxborough, died Tuesday of cancer. He was 37. A popular, well-loved man in his neighborhood, D'Angelo overcame a crippling blood disorder as a boy and went on to play football in high school and college. When he was diagnosed with cancer last August, D'Angelo remained optimistic. "He was a fighter," said his wife, Patricia. "He was making plans a week before he died about going on a cruise. " News of his death brought silence to the normally raucous lunchroom at Holy Family School, where nearly every child knew D'Angelo through his coaching and volunteering.
NEWS
February 13, 1995 | By Alison Fitzgerald, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Nick Cerasi stood by the cafeteria's double doors like a maitre d', meeting and greeting everyone who walked in. "Hi there, thanks for coming. Welcome. Registration's at that table. Thank you for coming out in the cold. . . . Thank you. . . . Thank you. " At 2:30 p.m., after nearly six hours of glad-handing at Highland Regional High School in Gloucester Township, a look of disbelief shaded Cerasi's eyes as people continued to pour through the door in groups of three or five.
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