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Blood Products

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NEWS
November 8, 1996 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A King of Prussia company that recently recalled some blood products because of possible bacterial contamination has suspended production at its sole U.S. manufacturing plant. The company, Centeon LLC, said it did not know when production would resume, but in a filing this week with the Securities and Exchange Commission stated that it did not expect to start distribution again before the first quarter of 1997. The estimate comes amid an inspection of the Kankakee, Ill., plant by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
NEWS
May 23, 1996 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Did you hear the one about the country that spent more than two years and $30 million in taxpayer dollars on a high-profile investigation of blood-product safety, then sued itself to keep the results secret? That's the drama that began unfolding in a courtroom yesterday, where a massive legal battle has erupted over a government inquiry into how thousands of Canadians contracted the AIDS virus and hepatitis C from transfusions received in the 1980s. At the center of the fray is Justice Horace Krever, an Ontario appeals court judge who presides over Canada's Commission of Inquiry Into the Blood System.
NEWS
July 18, 1995 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Not until it faced competitive pressures from abroad did a major American drug company aggressively attempt to eliminate from its blood products the viruses that were sickening thousands of hemophiliacs, according to sworn statements and confidential corporate documents in a lawsuit. Executives of Baxter Healthcare Inc. decided in 1979 to expedite the company's virus-killing research for hemophilia blood-clotting medicines after they learned that a West German competitor was on the brink of introducing a clotting drug that was heat-treated to kill hepatitis.
NEWS
July 7, 1995 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There was much prayer yesterday on West State Street. Out by the curb, just down from the Statehouse, Andrea McGann, 45, of Deptford, was in a van, starving herself and praying for God's intercession with Gov. Whitman to restore her job at the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). And up on the Statehouse steps was Andrea Johnson, 40, of Edison, confined to a wheelchair by multiple sclerosis and suffering from the virus that causes AIDS, contracted through her deceased husband, who was a hemophiliac.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | By Donna Shaw and Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Two years after a government commission blamed the Food and Drug Administration for "a failure of leadership" that allowed HIV-tainted blood products to kill thousands of Americans, the agency continues to stumble. Dangerous blood products take a month to recall, even after they are identified. Patients aren't notified when they have used contaminated medicines. If physicians call the FDA's emergency hotline on weekends or holidays, they get clerks, not medical experts. Those deficiencies and more were the subject of testimony and government reports released yesterday by a congressional subcommittee that is investigating the safety of the nation's blood supply.
NEWS
March 15, 1996 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With one Japanese company's top executives apologizing on their knees, the worldwide industry whose tainted blood products transmitted the AIDS virus to thousands of hemophiliacs agreed yesterday to pay $420,000 to each victim in Japan, plus monthly payments for as long as the victims live. The settlement concludes a case in which the companies and the Japanese government were accused of concealing their knowledge that the products contained HIV, the AIDS virus. Sources who asked not to be identified said another potential settlement, this one for the estimated 8,000 to 10,000 infected hemophiliacs in the United States, was being discussed.
NEWS
March 6, 1997 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge in Chicago yesterday gave four drug companies until early June to finalize a proposed settlement and pay $100,000 a person to about 4,600 HIV-infected hemophiliacs. U.S. District Judge John F. Grady said that if the companies did not agree to his schedule, he would reject the settlement as unfair. He set a May 1 deadline for them to notify him of their intentions. "We're going to do everything possible to see that this works," said Guy Esnouf, a spokesman for Rhone-Poulenc Rorer Inc,.
NEWS
November 27, 1997 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a sweeping report that harshly criticizes bureaucrats and industry alike for the 1980s tainted-blood scandal, a Canadian government commission concluded yesterday that a Montgomery County company broke Canadian law by not disclosing that its hemophilia medicines might be contaminated with the AIDS virus. "The principal actors in the blood system . . . refrained from taking essential preventative measures until causation had been proved," said the commission head, appeals court Justice Horace Krever.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two companies that make blood-clotting products have agreed to pay up to $160 million to hemophiliacs who contracted the AIDS virus from the medicines. The settlement with Rhone-Poulenc Rorer Inc. and Baxter International Inc. calls for the companies to contribute equally to a fund for U.S. citizens or residents who contracted HIV from the clotting agents, which are derived from human blood. Infected partners and children, as well as other survivors, also would be eligible for compensation.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three more high-ranking officials at the American Red Cross, including the head of its computer and information systems, have announced their resignations. The latest round of departures was announced internally last week, about a week after Red Cross president Richard F. Schubert announced that he would leave the organization, which is based in Washington, at the end of May. Shubert, 52, who had served as president since January 1983, said he was leaving to pursue other opportunities.
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BUSINESS
June 25, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia region and New Jersey are home to many pharmaceutical and life-sciences companies that send and receive finished medicines and raw drug ingredients around the globe. American Airlines officials snipped a ribbon and provided tours Tuesday at Philadelphia International Airport of a new $5 million cargo refrigeration facility catering to the cold storage needs of these companies. The 25,000-square-foot renovated warehouse opened six weeks ago, and can handle nearly four times the amount of perishable, time-sensitive, and valuable airfreight - including vaccines, blood products, gene therapies, tissues, insulin and immunotherapies - that travel in the belly of planes on American and merger partner US Airways passenger flights.
NEWS
August 19, 2013 | By Rong Hu and John Stern, For The Inquirer
One in an occasional series on attempts to solve a medical mystery. It was supposed to be a routine surgery. At least, as routine as surgery can be on the aorta - the largest blood vessel in the body, one connected directly to your heart, the one that carries all the blood going to every part of your body other than your lungs. The story started about two years ago, when a CT scan done for chest pain and difficult breathing showed that M.E. had an aortic aneurysm. An aneurysm is a dilation of a blood vessel - basically, part of the blood vessel begins to balloon and get wider.
NEWS
July 13, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The American Red Cross has issued an emergency request for blood and platelet donors, blaming hot weather and summer vacations for lower-than-expected donations in June. Donations last month were the lowest since 1997, said Anthony Tornetta, a spokesman for the Penn-Jersey Region of the Red Cross, based in Philadelphia. The organization collected 410,000 units of blood from volunteers last month, down 11 percent from the 459,000 collected in June 2012. Each unit is slightly more than a pint.
NEWS
June 8, 2009 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
The road to becoming a dancer, particularly for a girl, is a long, hard, highly competitive one. She must practice thousands of pli?s and tendus, and deal with sore muscles, strict diets, painful pointe shoes, blisters, bunions - and all the other dancers waiting in the wings. For 14-year-old Michaela DePrince, the road has been even rougher, carrying her from an African orphanage to a new life in Cherry Hill. But she already has begun to be noticed. In January, she won the Youth Grand Prix in the junior age division at the Philadelphia regional semifinal of the Youth America Grand Prix, the world's largest competition for student dancers.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2003 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Aventis S.A. said yesterday that it had a deal to sell its King of Prussia-based blood-products business to CSL Ltd. of Australia for $675 million and contingent payments that could add $250 million to the total. The company, Aventis Behring, makes blood-protein therapies, producing more than 30 plasma-derived medicines for people with illnesses ranging from hemophilia to immune deficiencies. About 275 of the 5,800 employees of Aventis Behring work in its King of Prussia headquarters.
NEWS
December 26, 2002 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If tensions with Iraq turn into a shooting war, the blood and plasma that battlefront medics might need to treat wounded Americans will come from here. McGuire Air Force Base in Burlington County and Travis Air Force Base in California are the only military facilities in the nation with labs that receive, store and ship blood overseas for the Air Force, Army and Navy. In a squat, warehouse-like building that many at McGuire know more as a place to get ice than a blood center, three members from each branch of the service work side by side, checking incoming shipments of blood and preparing to send them to U.S. bases in Europe and the Middle East.
NEWS
September 2, 2001 | By Arthur L. Caplan
The Bush administration and Congress were consumed recently over the controversy over public funding of embryonic stem-cell research. This is a subject of crucial importance: The prospect for cures for hundreds of thousands of Americans in five or 10 years hangs in the balance. But Congress and the administration are not paying sufficient attention to another issue that will affect the health of every American by this fall: ensuring an adequate supply of blood to keep our health-care system running as our nation gets ready to respond to the threat of mad cow disease.
NEWS
November 21, 2000 | By Matthew P. Blanchard, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A medical crusade that began in the Bible's Book of Deuteronomy took another step forward last week when Warminster Hospital unveiled its Center for Bloodless Medicine and Surgery. The center is a relief for area Jehovah's Witnesses, whose reading of Deuteronomy forbids them to accept blood transfusions - even if it is their own blood. Using an arsenal of strange gadgets such as the "harmonic scalpel" - which simultaneously cuts tissue and seals blood vessels - the hospital says it will now be able to perform major surgery without using a drop of outside blood.
NEWS
April 28, 1998 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Responding to widespread criticism, the world's major producers of plasma products vowed yesterday to work harder to ensure that critically ill patients will receive a life-sustaining medicine called intravenous immune globulin, now in short supply. "At this time, we cannot estimate how long the current shortage will last," said Jan Bult, executive director of the International Plasma Products Industry Association. But the organization "understands the critical need" for the product "and the seriousness of the current shortage," Bult told the government's Advisory Committee on Blood Safety and Availability meeting in Washington.
NEWS
November 27, 1997 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a sweeping report that harshly criticizes bureaucrats and industry alike for the 1980s tainted-blood scandal, a Canadian government commission concluded yesterday that a Montgomery County company broke Canadian law by not disclosing that its hemophilia medicines might be contaminated with the AIDS virus. "The principal actors in the blood system . . . refrained from taking essential preventative measures until causation had been proved," said the commission head, appeals court Justice Horace Krever.
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