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NEWS
June 1, 1998 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Diabetes isn't just about avoiding sugar. It's about needles, pricks and constant monitoring. It's about the long-term effects of extremely high blood-sugar levels: vision problems, kidney disease and amputations. And it's about avoiding extremely low blood-sugar levels that could lead to comas. "It's very difficult, even when they try their hardest, to control their blood glucose," said Jeffrey Joseph, assistant professor of anesthesiology at Jefferson Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University.
NEWS
June 11, 1996 | By Laura Meckler, ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Susan FitzGerald contributed to this article
The fight against diabetes is getting a $150 million shot in the arm: a major nationwide study aimed at prevention among people at risk for the disease. Researchers plan to recruit 4,000 people who have higher-than-normal blood sugar levels but do not yet have diabetes. The study will follow the participants for five years to test three approaches to preventing Type 2 diabetes, which accounts for 90 percent to 95 percent of all diabetes cases and affects about 15 million Americans.
NEWS
June 14, 1993 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Diabetics who rigorously control their blood-sugar levels can dramatically cut down on the complications of their disease, including damage to the eyes, kidneys and nerves, a landmark study has found. The long-awaited study found that patients who kept their blood sugar as close to normal as possible by getting three or more insulin injections a day and testing their blood sugar at least four times a day fared far better than patients who followed a standard routine of just one or two insulin shots and one blood-sugar test.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2011 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nobody likes needles. That simple idea is part of how former Jefferson Hospital surgeon Patrick Mooney hopes he and his investors will get rich. Whether delivering medicine or monitoring blood-sugar levels, sharp objects are often involved, but they don't always provide better results or financial efficiency - and they hurt. Mooney and his small company, Echo Therapeutics Inc., are developing devices that they hope will change all that. Echo, which had 17 people working in its facility in Franklin, Mass., moved its corporate headquarters to 8 Penn Center in Center City last week, and could add 25 people in the next 18 months, Mooney said in an interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2012 | byline w, o email
My 5 diabetes super foods 1. BLACK BEANS High in fiber and folate to regulate blood sugar. Use in soups, salads, chili. A 1/2-cup is a serving. Inexpensive, too! 2. CHOCOLATE Many experts say dark chocolate may help control blood sugar. Dark chocolate has more antioxidants than any other food. Sorry, a serving's just 1 ounce. 3. ONIONS Sulfur and flavonoids give onions a double bang for the buck. Sulfur helps with heart disease, thins the blood and boosts good cholesterol.
NEWS
November 30, 1994 | BY JUDY SINGELY
November has been "Diabetes Month," but for the 200,000 diabetics who live in the Delaware Valley, it is an every-month, everyday condition. For these people, blood sugar levels are often the first thing they think of upon waking, and the last thing on their minds before they fall asleep. They may never take a break from this condition, but they must have confidence in themselves. I tell my clients that living "well" with diabetes can be accomplished through knowledge, self-management and focus.
NEWS
April 28, 1988 | By Steve Stecklow and Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Pennsylvania Department of Health will investigate the case of a 76- year-old North Philadelphia man who died Friday at the James C. Giuffre Medical Center, a department spokesman said yesterday. The review of the care of Percy Walker of the 2600 block of North Warnock Street will be part of the department's continuing probe of patient care at the hospital, located at Eighth Street and Girard Avenue, said spokesman Gary Froseth. "Given the current situation at Giuffre, I think we would probably be remiss if we did not look at this particular incident," he said.
NEWS
August 14, 2006 | By John Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a mob scene worthy of Brad Pitt or Angelina Jolie. Nearly 1,000 people pushed into a Washington ballroom at the American Diabetes Association's annual convention, causing security guards to turn people away. The object of adoration wasn't a movie star or even a person, but rather a diabetes drug called Byetta, which helps to lower blood sugar. The new drug sold nearly $100 million in the last three months, partly because of an intriguing side effect: It helps people lose weight.
NEWS
July 9, 2005 | By Shirley Wang INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bob Maher's diabetes was shutting his body down. He no longer got the shakes or the sweats to warn him that his blood sugar was plummeting. Instead, he would just pass out. It made him scared to drive, to be alone, even to sleep. Chewie's going to change all that. The 2-year-old dog, an auburn Labrador mix named after the Star Wars character Chewbacca, has the ability to detect changes in Maher's blood sugar that are unrecognizable to Maher himself. Chewie then alerts Maher to correct it. To see the phenomenon "just makes the hair on the back of your neck stand up," said Jennifer Kriesel, director of development at Canine Partners for Life, a Chester County organization that trains service dogs for people with impaired mobility and medical conditions.
NEWS
August 1, 1990 | By Sydney Trent, Inquirer Staff Writer
The tall, distinguished-looking doctor with the gray-flecked beard leaned over a table and began explaining the results of a physical examination. Katherine "Kitty" Weismer, 73, listened intently. Weismer's blood sugar was high, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. "That means your body does not handle sugar in a completely normal fashion," said Martin Leicht. "This must be watched to make sure you don't become diabetic. " Weismer, a trim, petite woman with short gray hair, nodded.
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NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By Brian Maher, For The Inquirer
If you're a woman who exercises, the fear of bulking up may have crossed your mind. But regardless of what your fitness goals are, muscle can help you get there. Why women need to build muscle: Increase strength. Building muscle makes it easier to do everything from carrying groceries to keeping your balance to preventing injury to the joints while running, power walking, or bike riding. Rev up metabolism. Resting metabolic rate - the amount of calories burned while doing nothing - is determined by lean muscle mass.
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Managing diabetes can be tough. Tracking weight, monitoring glucose levels, counting carbohydrate consumption, and getting adequate exercise can tax even the most obsessively compulsive personalities, leading to fatigue or burnout when it no longer seems possible or even valuable to stick with the program. "The problem with diabetes is that it never goes away," said endocrinologist Mark Schutta. "It's a lifestyle disease, and it's challenging to lose weight, to take several medications, to monitor blood sugars.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The drama continued at Don Tollefson's fraud trial Thursday, when the former sportscaster complained of high blood sugar levels, ending the day's proceedings less than two hours after they began. Tollefson, 62, who has type 2 diabetes, had faced a second round of cross-examination by a Bucks County prosecutor over his charity's expenses. But Tollefson was instead taken to Doylestown Hospital by a Bucks County sheriff's deputy. Tollefson had told Bucks County Court Judge Rea Boylan that his blood-monitoring device showed dangerously high levels of blood sugar before arriving at court.
NEWS
January 4, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
G. Clayton Kyle, 90, formerly of Chestnut Hill, a Philadelphia endocrinologist who specialized in treating diabetes, died Wednesday, Dec. 24, of complications from a subdural hematoma at Beaumont at Bryn Mawr. Dr. Kyle spent his entire career at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) and served as the chairman of its medical board from 1977 until 1979. He rose to the level of clinical associate professor of medicine. Dr. Kyle's work centered on controlling the negative effects of diabetes.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
The first time Craig Alter, a pediatric endocrinologist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, heard the word for his specialty was as an eighth-grader. He was watching the original Star Trek when an endocrinologist joined Dr. McCoy to diagnose an adrenal condition in one of the starship Enterprise crew members. A longtime fan of the show, Alter also noted a second time when endocrinology played a role on the series. During the episode "Plato's Stepchildren," the crew encounters a character with dwarfism and Spock correctly states that it stemmed from a pituitary problem, another shout-out to Alter's future specialty.
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
When she was 13, Elizabeth Welsh entered a road race in Norristown. When she saw the huge trophy for the top female finisher, she made a vow: "I'm going to get that. " Welsh kept that promise, passing, among others, a fortysomething man to win the overall title. That trophy is in the bedroom of the house where she grew up in Haverford, draped with the many ribbons and medals she has won since in rowing and running contests. Welsh, 27, now lives in Fairmount. In May, she will receive her nurse practitioner degree from Villanova University, where she has been studying hard, perfecting clinical skills, and teaching nursing undergrads to earn her tuition.
NEWS
December 22, 2013 | By Joan Capuzzi, V.M.D., For The Inquirer
Daisy, a 3-year-old domestic short-haired cat, was brought to our clinic late last December because of a two-day history of vomiting, gagging, refusing food and water, and hiding under the bed. While being examined, the indoor cat assumed a hunched stance, with her neck somewhat outstretched. She was dehydrated, and her pulses were slightly weak. Her heart was racing, but she was breathing comfortably and her lungs sounded clear. Daisy's abdomen felt normal and did not seem painful when I palpated it. Her temperature, 102.5 degrees, was normal for a cat. During the exam, Daisy gagged a few times for no apparent reason.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Dr. John Stern, For The Inquirer
As he reached the end of a grueling 20-hour drive that took him halfway across the country, Bob was dreaming of what he would do when he reached home. He wanted to stretch his legs, visit his elderly mom, buy himself a dozen fresh crabs, steam them, and sit down to watch the Eagles. Not necessarily in that order. For years, Bob had been what doctors might categorize as a train wreck. A recovering alcoholic, he had been used to consuming a liter of vodka every few days. He smoked heavily too, and by the time he had reached his 40s, his body showed signs of all that hard living.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013
WHAT WOULD you say if I told you that you could profoundly cut your risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer? Significantly decrease your risk for Alzheimer's disease, too? And, better yet, that you could do all this without spending a single dime? Impossible, right? Wrong. All that and more may be possible simply by following the sage advice of Dr. Michael Mosley, a British medical journalist and co-author of The FastDiet: Lose Weight, Stay Healthy, and Live Longer with the Simple Secret of Intermittent Fasting . The "Fast Diet" is all the rage in Britain and could take flight here as well.
NEWS
March 26, 2013
DID YOU hear the footsteps last week? Are they coming for you next? The gargantuan CVS drugstore chain has ordered its nearly 200,000 employees to disclose personal health information - weight, height, body fat, blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar - or they will have a $600 penalty added to their annual health-insurance bill. CVS public-relations director Michael DeAngelis sees it differently, telling me that employees who take the survey will pay $600 less for health coverage.
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