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NEWS
September 11, 2016 | By Mike Natter, For The Inquirer
The screams of another child woke me from a restless sleep. When I opened my eyes, I found tubes and wires stuck all over my 9-year-old body. "Where am I?" I thought, watching a stretcher wheel by carrying a young boy, head wrapped in bloody gauze. The last thing I could remember was my father carrying me into the emergency room. It had been months since I slept through the night, because I had to keep getting up to use the bathroom due to the countless glasses of water I was chugging.
NEWS
June 1, 1998 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Diabetes isn't just about avoiding sugar. It's about needles, pricks and constant monitoring. It's about the long-term effects of extremely high blood-sugar levels: vision problems, kidney disease and amputations. And it's about avoiding extremely low blood-sugar levels that could lead to comas. "It's very difficult, even when they try their hardest, to control their blood glucose," said Jeffrey Joseph, assistant professor of anesthesiology at Jefferson Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University.
NEWS
June 11, 1996 | By Laura Meckler, ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Susan FitzGerald contributed to this article
The fight against diabetes is getting a $150 million shot in the arm: a major nationwide study aimed at prevention among people at risk for the disease. Researchers plan to recruit 4,000 people who have higher-than-normal blood sugar levels but do not yet have diabetes. The study will follow the participants for five years to test three approaches to preventing Type 2 diabetes, which accounts for 90 percent to 95 percent of all diabetes cases and affects about 15 million Americans.
NEWS
June 14, 1993 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Diabetics who rigorously control their blood-sugar levels can dramatically cut down on the complications of their disease, including damage to the eyes, kidneys and nerves, a landmark study has found. The long-awaited study found that patients who kept their blood sugar as close to normal as possible by getting three or more insulin injections a day and testing their blood sugar at least four times a day fared far better than patients who followed a standard routine of just one or two insulin shots and one blood-sugar test.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2011 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nobody likes needles. That simple idea is part of how former Jefferson Hospital surgeon Patrick Mooney hopes he and his investors will get rich. Whether delivering medicine or monitoring blood-sugar levels, sharp objects are often involved, but they don't always provide better results or financial efficiency - and they hurt. Mooney and his small company, Echo Therapeutics Inc., are developing devices that they hope will change all that. Echo, which had 17 people working in its facility in Franklin, Mass., moved its corporate headquarters to 8 Penn Center in Center City last week, and could add 25 people in the next 18 months, Mooney said in an interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2012 | byline w, o email
My 5 diabetes super foods 1. BLACK BEANS High in fiber and folate to regulate blood sugar. Use in soups, salads, chili. A 1/2-cup is a serving. Inexpensive, too! 2. CHOCOLATE Many experts say dark chocolate may help control blood sugar. Dark chocolate has more antioxidants than any other food. Sorry, a serving's just 1 ounce. 3. ONIONS Sulfur and flavonoids give onions a double bang for the buck. Sulfur helps with heart disease, thins the blood and boosts good cholesterol.
NEWS
November 30, 1994 | BY JUDY SINGELY
November has been "Diabetes Month," but for the 200,000 diabetics who live in the Delaware Valley, it is an every-month, everyday condition. For these people, blood sugar levels are often the first thing they think of upon waking, and the last thing on their minds before they fall asleep. They may never take a break from this condition, but they must have confidence in themselves. I tell my clients that living "well" with diabetes can be accomplished through knowledge, self-management and focus.
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
People with type 2 diabetes, the kind you are more likely to get as an adult, are at risk for a host of additional medical problems. Stroke and heart attack. Kidney disease. Blindness. Skin infections. Numbness in the feet. Add one more you and even your doctor may not have heard is connected: dementia. Diabetes at least doubles your risk of developing it. Even diabetics without dementia can have subtle cognitive problems. "Your average diabetologist, internal medicine doctor, they're still not aware of that information," said Luke Stoeckel, a neuropsychologist at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
NEWS
April 28, 1988 | By Steve Stecklow and Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Pennsylvania Department of Health will investigate the case of a 76- year-old North Philadelphia man who died Friday at the James C. Giuffre Medical Center, a department spokesman said yesterday. The review of the care of Percy Walker of the 2600 block of North Warnock Street will be part of the department's continuing probe of patient care at the hospital, located at Eighth Street and Girard Avenue, said spokesman Gary Froseth. "Given the current situation at Giuffre, I think we would probably be remiss if we did not look at this particular incident," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013
WHAT WOULD you say if I told you that you could profoundly cut your risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer? Significantly decrease your risk for Alzheimer's disease, too? And, better yet, that you could do all this without spending a single dime? Impossible, right? Wrong. All that and more may be possible simply by following the sage advice of Dr. Michael Mosley, a British medical journalist and co-author of The FastDiet: Lose Weight, Stay Healthy, and Live Longer with the Simple Secret of Intermittent Fasting . The "Fast Diet" is all the rage in Britain and could take flight here as well.
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NEWS
September 11, 2016 | By Mike Natter, For The Inquirer
The screams of another child woke me from a restless sleep. When I opened my eyes, I found tubes and wires stuck all over my 9-year-old body. "Where am I?" I thought, watching a stretcher wheel by carrying a young boy, head wrapped in bloody gauze. The last thing I could remember was my father carrying me into the emergency room. It had been months since I slept through the night, because I had to keep getting up to use the bathroom due to the countless glasses of water I was chugging.
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
People with type 2 diabetes, the kind you are more likely to get as an adult, are at risk for a host of additional medical problems. Stroke and heart attack. Kidney disease. Blindness. Skin infections. Numbness in the feet. Add one more you and even your doctor may not have heard is connected: dementia. Diabetes at least doubles your risk of developing it. Even diabetics without dementia can have subtle cognitive problems. "Your average diabetologist, internal medicine doctor, they're still not aware of that information," said Luke Stoeckel, a neuropsychologist at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
NEWS
June 5, 2016 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Erika Totten doesn't really remember the car crash. She recalls leaving her friend's house in Pennsylvania with her 2-year-old twins in the back of the car and heading back to her home in North Hanover, N.J. She vaguely remembers feeling a little confused, and a little lost. But the next thing she knew, she had run the car into a ditch, the police and ambulance arrived, and she was on her way to the hospital. No one was hurt. But the accident wasn't really a surprise. Totten had developed Type 1 diabetes at 21 after a severe case of mononucleosis that might have wiped out her insulin-producing beta cells.
NEWS
November 20, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
IT'S A TRADITION of Philadelphia sports, going to the strip club after an Eagles game, but one mother and daughter's postgame trip to the velvet gridiron, according to a federal lawsuit, was marred by double standards, illegal use of the hands by Philly's finest and a lacerated eyebrow. According to a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, Helen Reiber and her daughter, Heather Hughes, both of Coatesville, Chester County, attended an Eagles game on Nov. 17, 2013. The team was better then, their future still hopeful, and they stood atop the NFC East after beating Washington, 24-16.
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By Brian Maher, For The Inquirer
If you're a woman who exercises, the fear of bulking up may have crossed your mind. But regardless of what your fitness goals are, muscle can help you get there. Why women need to build muscle: Increase strength. Building muscle makes it easier to do everything from carrying groceries to keeping your balance to preventing injury to the joints while running, power walking, or bike riding. Rev up metabolism. Resting metabolic rate - the amount of calories burned while doing nothing - is determined by lean muscle mass.
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Managing diabetes can be tough. Tracking weight, monitoring glucose levels, counting carbohydrate consumption, and getting adequate exercise can tax even the most obsessively compulsive personalities, leading to fatigue or burnout when it no longer seems possible or even valuable to stick with the program. "The problem with diabetes is that it never goes away," said endocrinologist Mark Schutta. "It's a lifestyle disease, and it's challenging to lose weight, to take several medications, to monitor blood sugars.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The drama continued at Don Tollefson's fraud trial Thursday, when the former sportscaster complained of high blood sugar levels, ending the day's proceedings less than two hours after they began. Tollefson, 62, who has type 2 diabetes, had faced a second round of cross-examination by a Bucks County prosecutor over his charity's expenses. But Tollefson was instead taken to Doylestown Hospital by a Bucks County sheriff's deputy. Tollefson had told Bucks County Court Judge Rea Boylan that his blood-monitoring device showed dangerously high levels of blood sugar before arriving at court.
NEWS
January 4, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
G. Clayton Kyle, 90, formerly of Chestnut Hill, a Philadelphia endocrinologist who specialized in treating diabetes, died Wednesday, Dec. 24, of complications from a subdural hematoma at Beaumont at Bryn Mawr. Dr. Kyle spent his entire career at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) and served as the chairman of its medical board from 1977 until 1979. He rose to the level of clinical associate professor of medicine. Dr. Kyle's work centered on controlling the negative effects of diabetes.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
The first time Craig Alter, a pediatric endocrinologist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, heard the word for his specialty was as an eighth-grader. He was watching the original Star Trek when an endocrinologist joined Dr. McCoy to diagnose an adrenal condition in one of the starship Enterprise crew members. A longtime fan of the show, Alter also noted a second time when endocrinology played a role on the series. During the episode "Plato's Stepchildren," the crew encounters a character with dwarfism and Spock correctly states that it stemmed from a pituitary problem, another shout-out to Alter's future specialty.
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
When she was 13, Elizabeth Welsh entered a road race in Norristown. When she saw the huge trophy for the top female finisher, she made a vow: "I'm going to get that. " Welsh kept that promise, passing, among others, a fortysomething man to win the overall title. That trophy is in the bedroom of the house where she grew up in Haverford, draped with the many ribbons and medals she has won since in rowing and running contests. Welsh, 27, now lives in Fairmount. In May, she will receive her nurse practitioner degree from Villanova University, where she has been studying hard, perfecting clinical skills, and teaching nursing undergrads to earn her tuition.
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