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Blood Sugar

NEWS
August 1, 1990 | By Sydney Trent, Inquirer Staff Writer
The tall, distinguished-looking doctor with the gray-flecked beard leaned over a table and began explaining the results of a physical examination. Katherine "Kitty" Weismer, 73, listened intently. Weismer's blood sugar was high, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. "That means your body does not handle sugar in a completely normal fashion," said Martin Leicht. "This must be watched to make sure you don't become diabetic. " Weismer, a trim, petite woman with short gray hair, nodded.
NEWS
July 9, 2005 | By Shirley Wang INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bob Maher's diabetes was shutting his body down. He no longer got the shakes or the sweats to warn him that his blood sugar was plummeting. Instead, he would just pass out. It made him scared to drive, to be alone, even to sleep. Chewie's going to change all that. The 2-year-old dog, an auburn Labrador mix named after the Star Wars character Chewbacca, has the ability to detect changes in Maher's blood sugar that are unrecognizable to Maher himself. Chewie then alerts Maher to correct it. To see the phenomenon "just makes the hair on the back of your neck stand up," said Jennifer Kriesel, director of development at Canine Partners for Life, a Chester County organization that trains service dogs for people with impaired mobility and medical conditions.
NEWS
August 3, 1986 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
A former cabby, Morris Goren was strong. But this summer, Goren, who had been sparring for years with a formidable opponent, found that he had been dealt a stinging blow. Goren, 63, has diabetes that he has been able to keep under control. But this summer, a checkup revealed that his blood-sugar level had zoomed to a dangerously high level of 600, well above the normal range of 70 to 140. His doctor immediately sent him to Montgomery Hospital in Norristown, where Goren helped inaugurate the new Diabetes Treatment Center.
NEWS
November 16, 1998 | By Michelle Crouch, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sherrie Chinn, a 51-year-old Camden woman who learned late in life that she has diabetes, knew she should check her blood sugar every day. But she hated blood. And she didn't experience many symptoms - so it was easy to pretend the disease was not there. "I was very in denial," she said. "I was just like, 'I'll do it later, I'll do it later.' " Now, she does it every day - twice a day even. The difference, for Chinn, was a new computer program that links to her doctor.
NEWS
October 9, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
HYPERTENSION Even small lifestyle changes, such as reducing salt intake to less than 5 grams a day and limiting alcohol to two drinks daily, can help reduce your risk of high blood pressure. That's according to a Northwestern University Medical School five-year study of adults who cut their weight by 5 percent, limited sodium or salt intake to 4.5 grams daily, reduced alcoholic-beverage consumption to two drinks a day, exercised 30 minutes a day at least three days a week and stopped smoking.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2008
THRIVING WITH TYPE 1 CATHERINE MILLER, who is 26 and lives in West Chester, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 15. "I wasn't really surprised because my mom has it, my grandmother and grandfather had it, a couple of my uncles have it, so it was inevitable for at least me or my brother to get it, and I was the lucky one. " It threw her for a loop initially. "I was 15 and they were giving me all sorts of medication," she says. "But I knew it was going to come. " Taking the time to eat right for blood-sugar control was her major challenge as a teenager.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | By Jeff McGaw, Special to The Inquirer
The bag of peanut-butter cookies and a container of cake frosting that Betsy Comstock carries in her purse could someday save her or one of her children's lives. Comstock and her children have juvenile diabetes, a form of the disease that can lead to blindness, stroke, kidney failure, brain disorders or even death. About 11 million Americans, and an estimated 100 million people worldwide, have diabetes. The sugary treats that Comstock carries can be used to regulate her blood- sugar levels if she begins to feel dizzy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2013
1PROMOTES BRAIN HEALTH Researchers have long known that exercise promotes brain health. So, after doing your daily Sudoku puzzle, lace up your sneakers and get moving. 2 MAY PREVENT COLDS People who exercise regularly appear to get fewer colds. Exercise may spike the immune system, experts believe, helping to ward off colds. 3HELPS YOU HAVE A HEATHY PREGNANCY Exercising during pregnancy is beneficial to baby and mom. Most healthy women can exercise safely throughout pregnancy.
NEWS
April 9, 2012 | Stacey Burling
Several large studies have shown that people with diabetes are at especially high risk for Alzheimer's disease. Steven Arnold, director of the University of Pennsylvania's Memory Center, said diabetics are 50 to 100 percent more likely to get the fatal, memory-destroying disease. This has made researchers increasingly interested in the role that insulin, the hormone that's out of whack in diabetes, might play in Alzheimer's. In the brain, Arnold said, insulin is important for cell growth and releasing neurotransmitters that allow cells to communicate.
LIVING
October 5, 1998 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here she comes, Miss America Nicole Johnson, wearing a charcoal-gray MiniMed 507C on her belt. Or discreetly tucked in the middle of her bra. Or other places. "During the pageant, I wore it on the inside of my thigh," the 24-year-old brunette confided in an interview last week. "I told the judges my worst fear was that this pump would slip down my leg. " We're talking insulin pumps, of course. The coronation last month of Johnson, a.k.a. Miss Virginia, has thrown a spotlight on diabetes.
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