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Blood Sugar

NEWS
April 9, 2012 | Stacey Burling
Several large studies have shown that people with diabetes are at especially high risk for Alzheimer's disease. Steven Arnold, director of the University of Pennsylvania's Memory Center, said diabetics are 50 to 100 percent more likely to get the fatal, memory-destroying disease. This has made researchers increasingly interested in the role that insulin, the hormone that's out of whack in diabetes, might play in Alzheimer's. In the brain, Arnold said, insulin is important for cell growth and releasing neurotransmitters that allow cells to communicate.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2012
HERE ARE some tips (and a favorite snack recipe) from Tony Luke for those who'd like to follow his lead and remake their physical appearances in an organic and healthy way: * Understand that it's not about dieting or exercising for a specific period of time. "You will never keep the weight off if you don't make it a lifestyle change and if you don't make exercising as important a part of your life as getting up and showering in the morning. " * Moderation is the key. " 'Healthy' doesn't mean just eating wheat grass and alfalfa sprouts.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2011
I HATE TO ADMIT this, but I'm an addict. That's right. I am a slave to sugar, and until I came to terms with this simple fact, I struggled to keep excess weight off. Until quite recently, every confection I encountered called my name. I had the absolutely most wicked sweet tooth - one I honestly got from my parents, who are both confectionery snobs, if you will. I could even overindulge in nature's sweets like dates, figs, prunes and raisins. I can remember a time when I would go to Essene Market & Cafe in South Philly and dust off an entire tub of coconut date rolls on my stroll back home.
NEWS
June 7, 2011
IREAD WITH dismay your recent story ( "Split at the Top in D.A. Office?" ) and my tenure there as first assistant district attorney. The story, relying exclusively on anonymous sources, presented a terribly inaccurate picture of the office, was unfair to the overwhelming majority of prosecutors who work there and was even more unfair to the district attorney. There was none of the "simmering tension" described in the article, nor did anything "come to a boil. " Instead, after a year-and-a- half during which the only person who put in longer hours than I did was the district attorney, I needed to deal with some personal matters, and to consider my role as an administrator versus my satisfaction in a courtroom setting.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2011 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nobody likes needles. That simple idea is part of how former Jefferson Hospital surgeon Patrick Mooney hopes he and his investors will get rich. Whether delivering medicine or monitoring blood-sugar levels, sharp objects are often involved, but they don't always provide better results or financial efficiency - and they hurt. Mooney and his small company, Echo Therapeutics Inc., are developing devices that they hope will change all that. Echo, which had 17 people working in its facility in Franklin, Mass., moved its corporate headquarters to 8 Penn Center in Center City last week, and could add 25 people in the next 18 months, Mooney said in an interview.
NEWS
April 11, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: What is your opinion on taking D-Ribose for fibromyalgia? Answer: D-Ribose is one of those supplements that have garnered a lot of attention recently. D-Ribose is a 5-carbon sugar (unlike 6-carbon glucose sugar) directly involved in the production of "ATP," the fuel that every cell in the body uses for its energy production. D-Ribose doesn't raise blood sugar; rather it's directly converted to ATP. It can even lower blood sugar a bit. Supporters of D-Ribose claim it decreases pain, improves mental clarity, increases energy, improves stamina, creates an improved sense of well-being, and strengthens heart performance.
NEWS
March 30, 2010 | By James Osborne INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The emergency call came in, and Dave Milsted and Bruce Wallace climbed into the ambulance and raced through traffic to a Cherry Hill apartment building. They arrived to find an elderly woman with a history of diabetes struggling to breathe. Milsted, 47, a paramedic who has been in the business since he was 16, should have started checking her blood sugar. But doing so would have violated state rules that prohibit anyone considered a first-responder from doing anything beyond what is defined as basic life support, regardless of certification.
NEWS
March 9, 2010 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Can soda make you fat? In what may turn out to be fortunate timing for Mayor Nutter's proposed two-cents-per-ounce tax on sugary drinks, the most comprehensive study yet on the issue was published yesterday. Researchers followed more than 5,000 young adults for 20 years as they moved around the country and faced changing prices of soft drinks, which were then matched to the participants' dietary choices and health. Among the findings, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine: A $1 increase in the cost of a two-liter bottle of soda - about 1.5 cents per ounce - translated to 124 fewer calories per day from all sources, 2.34 pounds lower body weight per year, and significant improvement in a measure of heart-disease risk.
NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By Karen Knee For the Inquirer
Quest for a new pancreas For people with Type 1 diabetes, managing blood sugar can be a full-time gig. Jeffrey Joseph, director of Jefferson Medical College's Artificial Pancreas Center, is trying to change that. An artificial pancreas, Joseph explained, would be like a pacemaker for blood sugar. The device would consist of a continuous blood-sugar monitor communicating with a "smart" insulin pump to give just the right dose of insulin. Instead of having to draw blood from four to 12 times a day - and still never knowing if their blood sugar is going up or down - diabetics could go about their day like the rest of us, without the fear of becoming hyper- or hypoglycemic.
NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By TOM AVRIL Inquirer Staff Writer
After she lost her job as a social worker last year, and her health insurance with it, Vanessa Sheppard chose a risky way to save money: She stopped buying the disposable test strips she needed to check her blood glucose level. Once, having not tested herself for days, the Type 2 diabetes patient felt so ill that she could not get out of bed. Her mother, who also has diabetes, came to visit and insisted that she borrow her glucose meter and a test strip. The result: a disturbingly high level exceeding 200. "You get real worried," said Sheppard, 50, of South Philadelphia, whose doctor had told her to shoot for readings between 90 and 130. "You know you need this to maintain your health.
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