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Blood Sugar

NEWS
March 30, 2010 | By James Osborne INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The emergency call came in, and Dave Milsted and Bruce Wallace climbed into the ambulance and raced through traffic to a Cherry Hill apartment building. They arrived to find an elderly woman with a history of diabetes struggling to breathe. Milsted, 47, a paramedic who has been in the business since he was 16, should have started checking her blood sugar. But doing so would have violated state rules that prohibit anyone considered a first-responder from doing anything beyond what is defined as basic life support, regardless of certification.
NEWS
March 9, 2010 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Can soda make you fat? In what may turn out to be fortunate timing for Mayor Nutter's proposed two-cents-per-ounce tax on sugary drinks, the most comprehensive study yet on the issue was published yesterday. Researchers followed more than 5,000 young adults for 20 years as they moved around the country and faced changing prices of soft drinks, which were then matched to the participants' dietary choices and health. Among the findings, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine: A $1 increase in the cost of a two-liter bottle of soda - about 1.5 cents per ounce - translated to 124 fewer calories per day from all sources, 2.34 pounds lower body weight per year, and significant improvement in a measure of heart-disease risk.
NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By Karen Knee For the Inquirer
Quest for a new pancreas For people with Type 1 diabetes, managing blood sugar can be a full-time gig. Jeffrey Joseph, director of Jefferson Medical College's Artificial Pancreas Center, is trying to change that. An artificial pancreas, Joseph explained, would be like a pacemaker for blood sugar. The device would consist of a continuous blood-sugar monitor communicating with a "smart" insulin pump to give just the right dose of insulin. Instead of having to draw blood from four to 12 times a day - and still never knowing if their blood sugar is going up or down - diabetics could go about their day like the rest of us, without the fear of becoming hyper- or hypoglycemic.
NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By TOM AVRIL Inquirer Staff Writer
After she lost her job as a social worker last year, and her health insurance with it, Vanessa Sheppard chose a risky way to save money: She stopped buying the disposable test strips she needed to check her blood glucose level. Once, having not tested herself for days, the Type 2 diabetes patient felt so ill that she could not get out of bed. Her mother, who also has diabetes, came to visit and insisted that she borrow her glucose meter and a test strip. The result: a disturbingly high level exceeding 200. "You get real worried," said Sheppard, 50, of South Philadelphia, whose doctor had told her to shoot for readings between 90 and 130. "You know you need this to maintain your health.
NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By MARIE MCCULLOUGH Inquirer Staff Writer
A few days after Mike Pezzano had gastric-bypass surgery, his diabetes disappeared. By the time he went home from Crozer-Chester Medical Center, the Folsom resident was off the four medications he had used for a decade to control his blood sugar. "When I left the hospital, they said, 'Monitor your blood sugar for a few days,' " recalls Pezzano, 53, who has shed more than 100 pounds in the year since his operation and is approaching his target weight of 200. "The readings were all normal.
NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jack McLaughlin is a bright, articulate Lionville Middle School sixth grader whose main mission these days, along with schoolwork, is keeping his blood sugar under control. Since his diabetes was diagnosed last year when he was 10, the Chester County boy has mastered the tedious process of managing the chronic illness, using a beeper-size, computerized pump that injects insulin into his bloodstream. Counting grams of carbohydrates in order to program the pump with the correct dosage has become as much a part of his daily life as getting dressed and brushing his teeth.
NEWS
November 17, 2009 | By MARIE MCCULLOUGH, Inquirer Staff Writer
A few days after Mike Pezzano had gastric-bypass surgery, his diabetes disappeared. By the time he went home from Crozer-Chester Medical Center, the Folsom resident was off the four medications he had used for a decade to control his blood sugar. "When I left the hospital, they said, 'Monitor your blood sugar for a few days,' " recalls Pezzano, 53, who has shed more than 100 pounds in the year since his operation and is approaching his target weight of 200. "The readings were all normal.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2008
THRIVING WITH TYPE 1 CATHERINE MILLER, who is 26 and lives in West Chester, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 15. "I wasn't really surprised because my mom has it, my grandmother and grandfather had it, a couple of my uncles have it, so it was inevitable for at least me or my brother to get it, and I was the lucky one. " It threw her for a loop initially. "I was 15 and they were giving me all sorts of medication," she says. "But I knew it was going to come. " Taking the time to eat right for blood-sugar control was her major challenge as a teenager.
NEWS
April 1, 2008 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When doctors told 28-year-old Nakia East that her 1-year-old's sudden weight loss and unusual thirst were caused by diabetes, she found herself thrust into a whole new level of parenting. "They told me everything was going to change," said East, who lives in Upper Darby. Since then, she has learned to inject her son, Yanaan, with insulin four times every day. She tracks every ounce of food he eats and measures his blood sugar after each meal. And then there are the terrifying moments when the readings plunge far too low. "They told me he's going to have this his whole life," she said recently, resigned to her son's fate.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2007 | By BETH D'ADDONO For the Daily News
THERE ARE always at least two desserts on the Feury family holiday table. That's not because chefs Terrence and Patrick Feury and their families are mad for sweets - if anything, the two brothers - who are on the verge of opening Maia, a restaurant, market and cafe in Villanova - prefer their desserts on the savory side. But their mother, Frances, who lives in North Jersey, has Type One diabetes and can't eat regular desserts. So for her they make a sugar-free dessert, usually something featuring seasonal fruit.
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