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Blood Sugar

NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By MARIE MCCULLOUGH Inquirer Staff Writer
A few days after Mike Pezzano had gastric-bypass surgery, his diabetes disappeared. By the time he went home from Crozer-Chester Medical Center, the Folsom resident was off the four medications he had used for a decade to control his blood sugar. "When I left the hospital, they said, 'Monitor your blood sugar for a few days,' " recalls Pezzano, 53, who has shed more than 100 pounds in the year since his operation and is approaching his target weight of 200. "The readings were all normal.
NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jack McLaughlin is a bright, articulate Lionville Middle School sixth grader whose main mission these days, along with schoolwork, is keeping his blood sugar under control. Since his diabetes was diagnosed last year when he was 10, the Chester County boy has mastered the tedious process of managing the chronic illness, using a beeper-size, computerized pump that injects insulin into his bloodstream. Counting grams of carbohydrates in order to program the pump with the correct dosage has become as much a part of his daily life as getting dressed and brushing his teeth.
NEWS
November 17, 2009 | By MARIE MCCULLOUGH, Inquirer Staff Writer
A few days after Mike Pezzano had gastric-bypass surgery, his diabetes disappeared. By the time he went home from Crozer-Chester Medical Center, the Folsom resident was off the four medications he had used for a decade to control his blood sugar. "When I left the hospital, they said, 'Monitor your blood sugar for a few days,' " recalls Pezzano, 53, who has shed more than 100 pounds in the year since his operation and is approaching his target weight of 200. "The readings were all normal.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2008
THRIVING WITH TYPE 1 CATHERINE MILLER, who is 26 and lives in West Chester, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 15. "I wasn't really surprised because my mom has it, my grandmother and grandfather had it, a couple of my uncles have it, so it was inevitable for at least me or my brother to get it, and I was the lucky one. " It threw her for a loop initially. "I was 15 and they were giving me all sorts of medication," she says. "But I knew it was going to come. " Taking the time to eat right for blood-sugar control was her major challenge as a teenager.
NEWS
April 1, 2008 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When doctors told 28-year-old Nakia East that her 1-year-old's sudden weight loss and unusual thirst were caused by diabetes, she found herself thrust into a whole new level of parenting. "They told me everything was going to change," said East, who lives in Upper Darby. Since then, she has learned to inject her son, Yanaan, with insulin four times every day. She tracks every ounce of food he eats and measures his blood sugar after each meal. And then there are the terrifying moments when the readings plunge far too low. "They told me he's going to have this his whole life," she said recently, resigned to her son's fate.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2007 | By BETH D'ADDONO For the Daily News
THERE ARE always at least two desserts on the Feury family holiday table. That's not because chefs Terrence and Patrick Feury and their families are mad for sweets - if anything, the two brothers - who are on the verge of opening Maia, a restaurant, market and cafe in Villanova - prefer their desserts on the savory side. But their mother, Frances, who lives in North Jersey, has Type One diabetes and can't eat regular desserts. So for her they make a sugar-free dessert, usually something featuring seasonal fruit.
NEWS
August 14, 2006 | By John Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a mob scene worthy of Brad Pitt or Angelina Jolie. Nearly 1,000 people pushed into a Washington ballroom at the American Diabetes Association's annual convention, causing security guards to turn people away. The object of adoration wasn't a movie star or even a person, but rather a diabetes drug called Byetta, which helps to lower blood sugar. The new drug sold nearly $100 million in the last three months, partly because of an intriguing side effect: It helps people lose weight.
NEWS
November 22, 2005 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The evidence against nurse Jean Saxon was circumstantial, but overwhelming. It took a Bucks County jury only an hour to convict her yesterday of first-degree murder in the insulin-induced death of her husband, Jerry, 52, in March 2003. The prosecution argued that Saxon's weapon was unusual, but her motive wasn't: She injected her nondiabetic husband with insulin, causing his blood sugar to drop to a remarkably low level. She did it to gain $152,000 in life-insurance benefits, her husband's pension, their new home, and the freedom to be with the married coworker with whom she was having an affair, said Michelle A. Henry, chief deputy district attorney.
NEWS
July 9, 2005 | By Shirley Wang INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bob Maher's diabetes was shutting his body down. He no longer got the shakes or the sweats to warn him that his blood sugar was plummeting. Instead, he would just pass out. It made him scared to drive, to be alone, even to sleep. Chewie's going to change all that. The 2-year-old dog, an auburn Labrador mix named after the Star Wars character Chewbacca, has the ability to detect changes in Maher's blood sugar that are unrecognizable to Maher himself. Chewie then alerts Maher to correct it. To see the phenomenon "just makes the hair on the back of your neck stand up," said Jennifer Kriesel, director of development at Canine Partners for Life, a Chester County organization that trains service dogs for people with impaired mobility and medical conditions.
SPORTS
March 5, 2005 | By Rob Parent INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Like many teenagers, Brendan Hager doesn't have to be dragged out of bed to go to school. He sets his own routine when the morning bell tolls. "Wake up in the morning, see how my blood sugar is and then give myself the first shot," Hager said. It is the first of what commonly are four injections of insulin for Hager, a junior at Conestoga and a Type 1 diabetic who learned long ago to cope with his disease, and succeed despite it. Hager is the starting point guard for the Pioneers boys' basketball team, which opens play in the PIAA Class AAAA state tournament tomorrow against District 3's Red Lion at Carlisle High School.
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