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Blood Sugar

NEWS
June 24, 2001 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For Zachary Shapiro, 5, every day begins with a sharp pain. He was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 3, and his parents, Deirdre and Harvey Shapiro, must prick their son's finger every morning to check his blood sugar level and inject the proper dose of insulin. This week, Zachary, who often asks his parents if other people have diabetes, will be one of 199 children attending the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International Children's Congress 2001 in Washington.
NEWS
March 8, 2001 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge yesterday approved a class-action lawsuit against the city and police by a group of diabetics who say they were denied insulin or medical care while in police custody. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Petrese B. Tucker sets in motion a legal inquiry into why police purportedly failed to train personnel in handling diabetic detainees despite a 1982 agreement to settle a similar 1978 lawsuit. The legal issues were raised in February 2000 with a federal lawsuit filed by a Philadelphia cabaret owner who contended he was brought "close to death" after police arrested him in 1999 for a minor liquor-code violation, locked him in a holding cell for almost 24 hours, and denied him access to insulin and blood-pressure medicine.
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Adult-onset diabetes has risen to an epidemic 14.4 million cases in this country, and while scientists know this rise parallels the expanding waistlines of Americans, they could not figure out how carrying extra fat triggered the disease. Now, scientists at the University of Pennsylvania say they have discovered a hormone, resistin, which is released by fat cells and appears to bring on adult-onset, or type II, diabetes, which can lead to kidney failure, heart failure, nerve damage, blindness, and amputation of limbs.
NEWS
March 1, 2000 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a medical advance that could end painful finger pricks for the seven million diabetics who do them every day, researchers have extracted blood sugar right through the skin, without needles. The technique uses ultrasound to open microscopic spaces in the skin through which a tiny bit of fluid can escape. The fluid is then analyzed to determine glucose, or sugar, levels in the blood. The method, which was successfully tested on seven diabetics, is reported in the current issue of the journal Nature Medicine.
NEWS
November 16, 1998 | By Michelle Crouch, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sherrie Chinn, a 51-year-old Camden woman who learned late in life that she has diabetes, knew she should check her blood sugar every day. But she hated blood. And she didn't experience many symptoms - so it was easy to pretend the disease was not there. "I was very in denial," she said. "I was just like, 'I'll do it later, I'll do it later.' " Now, she does it every day - twice a day even. The difference, for Chinn, was a new computer program that links to her doctor.
LIVING
October 5, 1998 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here she comes, Miss America Nicole Johnson, wearing a charcoal-gray MiniMed 507C on her belt. Or discreetly tucked in the middle of her bra. Or other places. "During the pageant, I wore it on the inside of my thigh," the 24-year-old brunette confided in an interview last week. "I told the judges my worst fear was that this pump would slip down my leg. " We're talking insulin pumps, of course. The coronation last month of Johnson, a.k.a. Miss Virginia, has thrown a spotlight on diabetes.
NEWS
June 1, 1998 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Diabetes isn't just about avoiding sugar. It's about needles, pricks and constant monitoring. It's about the long-term effects of extremely high blood-sugar levels: vision problems, kidney disease and amputations. And it's about avoiding extremely low blood-sugar levels that could lead to comas. "It's very difficult, even when they try their hardest, to control their blood glucose," said Jeffrey Joseph, assistant professor of anesthesiology at Jefferson Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University.
FOOD
October 29, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
The Zone has been criticized as tough to follow, but you can still reap its benefits, Nancy Steadman writes in the current Redbook, by following these guidelines: First, make sure a 40-30-30 diet is right for you by testing how carbohydrate foods affect you. During the first two weeks, stay completely away from quickly digested carbs - bread, pasta and potatoes. You can gradually reintroduce them into your diet, but in small quantities. Maintain a specific ratio of protein to carbs for each meal - ideally, 3 grams of protein for every 4 of carbohydrates.
NEWS
August 7, 1997 | By Linda Wright Moore
For La'Shaira Cooke, summer is not about lazy afternoons, punctuated by play and Popsicles. Day camp and sports are not allowed. La'Shaira, 9, would like nothing better than to run wild and free in the August heat, anticipating a sweet custard cone to cool off at dusk. But because she suffers from "brittle" diabetes, such simple childhood pleasures are out of bounds. Sweet foods and too much activity can upset the delicate balance of insulin and sugar in her bloodstream, resulting in diabetic shock or other complications that land her in the hospital - or cost her her life.
NEWS
February 18, 1997 | By Monica Yant, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Preliminary diagnoses at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia indicate that Esther Elana Poncz died of an aneurysm-like eruption in her brain unrelated to her dental surgery, anesthetic, or her diabetes, her doctor said yesterday. Poncz, 17, of Wynnewood, a senior at Lower Merion High School, died Friday at Children's Hospital after having her wisdom teeth removed. She most likely suffered a condition similar to an aneurysm, in which a weak blood vessel in the brain fills up like a sac with blood over time, then erupts, said her physician, Lester Baker.
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