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Blood Vessels

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BUSINESS
February 13, 1999 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Listen, Tess, we need to have a heart-to-heart here. It's about that chocolate heart you are selling at your stand at the Reading Terminal Market. "It's a little too weird looking," said Elizabeth Bryson, who works in a law office in Center City, checking out the heart yesterday at Theresa Mueller's Chocolate by Mueller booth. "But each to his own thing. That's why we don't have just vanilla ice cream. " The heart to which Bryson is referring is no ordinary Valentine-shaped chocolate.
LIVING
July 10, 1995 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Clare Murray's dreamy smile is deceptive. She is about to have a stainless-steel wire run into her 68-year-old heart. Her silver hair is hardly mussed by the pillow as she lies in a bed on the fourth floor at Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center in Camden. Her little gold earrings are still in place. Skin crinkles at the corners of her blue eyes when she talks. She says she is not afraid. She could have been playing bridge this noon. It would not have been a blood match.
NEWS
July 29, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A heated, computer-controlled nozzle glided smoothly back and forth, then up and down, depositing a thin trail of sugar in the shape of a delicate, miniature cage. A scene from a high-tech pastry kitchen? A 21st-century reboot of Willy Wonka's candy factory? Far from it. The sugar cage was a first step toward manufacturing blood vessels for artificial organs, made with a custom-built 3-D "printer" in a bioengineering lab at the University of Pennsylvania. Once they harden, these crisscrossing lines of sugar can be surrounded with a gel that contains cells from the desired type of organ - say, a liver.
NEWS
October 27, 1995 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The most common cause of ischemia - the heart affliction of Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin - is coronary artery disease, which accounts for the vast majority of the world's heart disease. Ischemia - the medical term for what happens when the heart doesn't get enough oxygenated blood - occurs when fatty deposits, called plaque, build up in a person's arteries, blocking the flow of blood. When that person exercises or becomes excited, the heart beats faster and, thus, requires more blood.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - One of the scariest parts of bypass surgery - having your heart stopped and going on a heart-lung machine while doctors fix your clogged arteries - does not cause mental decline, as many people have feared, and is safe even in the elderly, two landmark studies show. Bypass surgery is one of the most common operations in the world. There is debate about the best way to do it, and patients often are given a choice. Usually doctors stop the heart to make it easier to connect new blood vessels to detour around blocked ones.
SPORTS
November 15, 2012 | BY MARK KRAM, Daily News Staff Writer kramm.phillynews.com
BIANCA PATTERSON told herself not to panic. She had just received word that her husband, Eagles defensive tackle Mike Patterson, had collapsed with a seizure on the practice field during a training-camp session at Lehigh University in 2011. No one could give her any more information, except that he was undergoing tests at Lehigh Valley Hospital. But Bianca remained calm as she drove there from Cherry Hill, N.J. And she prayed. She wondered what it could have been. Nothing had ever happened like this before.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: What's a good strategy for improving my memory? I don't think I have Alzheimer's, but my memory at 74 years of age isn't quite what it used to be.   Answer: Millions of older people find that while they're not getting senile, it's taking longer to find the precise piece of information within their vast library of accumulated knowledge. Learning new information also seems to be a challenge for many older folks. Crossword puzzles, Sudoku, and other word games are one way folks try to keep their brain active.
NEWS
December 29, 2003 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Winter may be hazardous to your cardiovascular health, even if you spend it in a place that feels like summer. A well-known phenomenon - an increase in heart attacks during the winter months - has been documented even in such warm, sunny climates as Hawaii, Florida and Southern California. In Los Angeles, for instance, a study found 33 percent more heart attack deaths in December and January than June through September. "We used to think it [an increase in heart attacks] was related to the first snow of winter.
NEWS
December 10, 1986 | By Linda Herskowitz, Inquirer Staff Writer
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania announced a significant advance yesterday in their quest to use a muscle in the back as a booster pump to assist an irreversibly weak heart. If successful, the research could provide a new alternative for thousands of Americans suffering from congestive heart failure, most of whom die within one year of diagnosis. Researchers say it could provide a cost-effective alternative to drugs, and a much simpler, more effective treatment than heart transplants or a mechanical heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2013 | By Gloria Hochman, For The Inquirer
First of two parts on strokes in younger people. The second part will appear next Monday in Health & Science. Brent Wylie was arguing with the doctors in the emergency room at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta. They said he had just had a stroke; he insisted that he had had a few beers and was probably drunk. That's why he had fallen on the sidewalk and was slurring his words. "I had just graduated from college two months earlier, and I was totally healthy," Wylie, then 23, said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 13, 2014 | By Drs. Anthony Scarpaci and Janani Rangaswami, For The Inquirer
Sandra Smith sat on a gurney in the hallway of the emergency room for the second time in two weeks, feeling light-headed and unsure of what was going on. A healthy 70-year-old, she had had her only brush with a hospital two months earlier, when she had a laparoscopic repair of a hiatal hernia, a condition that gave her heartburn, but was fixed easily. "Your blood pressure drops significantly when you stand up, which is making you light-headed," the ER doctor said, explaining her symptoms.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - One of the scariest parts of bypass surgery - having your heart stopped and going on a heart-lung machine while doctors fix your clogged arteries - does not cause mental decline, as many people have feared, and is safe even in the elderly, two landmark studies show. Bypass surgery is one of the most common operations in the world. There is debate about the best way to do it, and patients often are given a choice. Usually doctors stop the heart to make it easier to connect new blood vessels to detour around blocked ones.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2013 | By Gloria Hochman, For The Inquirer
First of two parts on strokes in younger people. The second part will appear next Monday in Health & Science. Brent Wylie was arguing with the doctors in the emergency room at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta. They said he had just had a stroke; he insisted that he had had a few beers and was probably drunk. That's why he had fallen on the sidewalk and was slurring his words. "I had just graduated from college two months earlier, and I was totally healthy," Wylie, then 23, said.
SPORTS
November 15, 2012 | BY MARK KRAM, Daily News Staff Writer kramm.phillynews.com
BIANCA PATTERSON told herself not to panic. She had just received word that her husband, Eagles defensive tackle Mike Patterson, had collapsed with a seizure on the practice field during a training-camp session at Lehigh University in 2011. No one could give her any more information, except that he was undergoing tests at Lehigh Valley Hospital. But Bianca remained calm as she drove there from Cherry Hill, N.J. And she prayed. She wondered what it could have been. Nothing had ever happened like this before.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: What's a good strategy for improving my memory? I don't think I have Alzheimer's, but my memory at 74 years of age isn't quite what it used to be.   Answer: Millions of older people find that while they're not getting senile, it's taking longer to find the precise piece of information within their vast library of accumulated knowledge. Learning new information also seems to be a challenge for many older folks. Crossword puzzles, Sudoku, and other word games are one way folks try to keep their brain active.
NEWS
July 29, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A heated, computer-controlled nozzle glided smoothly back and forth, then up and down, depositing a thin trail of sugar in the shape of a delicate, miniature cage. A scene from a high-tech pastry kitchen? A 21st-century reboot of Willy Wonka's candy factory? Far from it. The sugar cage was a first step toward manufacturing blood vessels for artificial organs, made with a custom-built 3-D "printer" in a bioengineering lab at the University of Pennsylvania. Once they harden, these crisscrossing lines of sugar can be surrounded with a gel that contains cells from the desired type of organ - say, a liver.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 7:30 a.m. on a frigid winter day, the amputation-prevention team gathered in a conference room at Temple University Hospital for their weekly review of the most difficult cases. Podiatrist Andrew Meyr and blood-vessel surgeon Eric T. Choi - the "toe and flow" doctors - led a discussion with five other colleagues. Choi used his laptop computer to project a slide showing the feet of a 68-year-old African American diabetic. The right foot had a gaping wound on the heel. The toes of the left foot were black and shriveled by gangrene.
NEWS
December 29, 2003 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Winter may be hazardous to your cardiovascular health, even if you spend it in a place that feels like summer. A well-known phenomenon - an increase in heart attacks during the winter months - has been documented even in such warm, sunny climates as Hawaii, Florida and Southern California. In Los Angeles, for instance, a study found 33 percent more heart attack deaths in December and January than June through September. "We used to think it [an increase in heart attacks] was related to the first snow of winter.
NEWS
September 16, 2003 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
University of Pennsylvania researchers are testing a nonsurgical technique for repairing severe mitral-valve leaks that may spare patients the ordeal of open-heart surgery, the standard treatment. About four million Americans have a mitral valve that fails to close properly, allowing blood to leak back into the upper chamber of the heart. Although mild leaks are harmless or treatable with drugs, about 250,000 people develop such serious mitral-valve regurgitation each year that their hearts begin to weaken.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1999 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Listen, Tess, we need to have a heart-to-heart here. It's about that chocolate heart you are selling at your stand at the Reading Terminal Market. "It's a little too weird looking," said Elizabeth Bryson, who works in a law office in Center City, checking out the heart yesterday at Theresa Mueller's Chocolate by Mueller booth. "But each to his own thing. That's why we don't have just vanilla ice cream. " The heart to which Bryson is referring is no ordinary Valentine-shaped chocolate.
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