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Bloomsday

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In honor of Bloomsday, the literary holiday commemorating the odyssey of Leopold Bloom, the hero of James Joyce's Ulysses, the Art Museum is hosting a festival of Joyce-inspired films on Saturday. Unlike many literary novelists whose works are so one-dimensional on screen, some of Joyce's books adapt very well. His stream-of-consciousness narration, itself perhaps influenced by cinema techniques, enables viewers to get into the heads of the characters of Mary Ellen Bute's Finnegans Wake (1965)
NEWS
June 17, 2004 | By Michael D. Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia read its way through James Joyce's Dublin again yesterday, as it has done every June 16 for the last dozen years. Nearly 100 local celebrities, along with lesser-known Joyce fans, took turns navigating the intricate prose of Ulysses in a public reading on the 100th anniversary of the day the novel, an epic that many consider the premier English-language novel of the 20th century, was set. The readers stood on the sidewalk in...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bloomsday, the literary celebration of James Joyce's modernist classic Ulysses , is held across the world every June 16. From Australia to Hungary, from the Czech Republic to Philadelphia, fans gather to read and discuss Joyce's allusive, poetical, musical, and often elusive work. The local Bloomsday event features a daylong reading of passages from the novel by more than 75 local men and women drawn from every walk of life at three locations - the steps of the Free Library of Philadelphia's Central Library, Rittenhouse Square, and the Rosenbach Museum & Library.
NEWS
May 19, 2013
It's hard to say whether Warren Bloom would be a bad traffic judge. That's because the job, for which Bloom is seeking the Democratic nomination on Tuesday, has virtually no prerequisites beyond possessing a pulse, living in Philadelphia, and winning a pale imitation of an election. It's somewhat easier to determine whether Bloom has, at least at times, been a bad taxpayer, a bad uncle, and a very bad rapper. That's because he owes more than $20,000 in taxes (which might be helped by a traffic judge's $91,000 salary)
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stately, plump, a 1922 first edition of James Joyce's Ulysses sits in state at the Rosenbach Museum and Library. And right across from it, 310 yellow rubber gloves dangle from the ceiling in a concentric spiral, bearing, in black Sharpie, the entire text of Ulysses , starting with Stately, plump on Glove 1 and, right in the center, finishing with the word Yes   on the ring finger of Glove 310. It's called Thy Father's Spirit:...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1994 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On June 16, 1904, Leopold Bloom, a quintessentially ordinary man living in Dublin, spends the day doing quintessentially ordinary things, in James Joyce's extraordinary novel Ulysses. He feeds the cat. He makes breakfast for himself and his wife, Molly - tea and toast for her and pork kidneys for himself. He goes to the "jakes," as the Irish call the outhouse. He walks to his job as an ad canvasser. For lunch he has a Gorgonzola cheese sandwich and a glass of wine. He walks along the beach and gazes at the girls.
NEWS
June 13, 2004 | By Frank Wilson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the 20th anniversary of the events in Ulysses - thought by many the greatest novel of the 20th century - James Joyce wrote this in his notebook: "Today, 16 of June 1924 twenty years after. Will anybody remember this date. " The suggestion of doubt is uncharacteristic. Joyce may often have been short of cash, but he was rarely short of self-confidence. As it happens, he need not have worried. On Wednesday, the centenary of "Bloomsday" - that fictional day in Dublin - will be celebrated in cities around the world.
FOOD
June 24, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
If you'd dropped by the double-wide townhouse that constitutes the Rosenbach Museum and Library last Wednesday, the crown jewels were on brazen display. The usual maroon sun drapes that shroud the venerable texts were flung aside; the stone, as it were, rolled away. It was Bloomsday, marking the day (June 16 in 1904, which was a Thursday , by the way) that James Joyce immortalizes in Ulysses , in large part employing images of the foods of workaday Dublin - the scent of pungent meat juices in a rowdy hall, a settling glass of Burgundy, gulls diving for crumbs of Banbury cake.
FOOD
June 10, 1998 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Mr. Leopold Bloom ate with relish the inner organs of beasts and fowls. He liked thick giblet soup, nutty gizzards, a stuffed roast heart, liver slices fried with crust crumbs, fried hen cods' roes. Most of all he liked grilled mutton kidneys which gave to his palate a fine tang. . . . - from James Joyce's "Ulysses" Breakfast "fry" is a big part of any Irishman's taste memory of Erin. And it is integral to the menu based on the adventures of Leopold Bloom and author James Joyce that will be offered Tuesday when the Plough & the Stars in Old City celebrates Bloomsday, the international quasi-holiday celebrated June 16 by Joyce's fans.
NEWS
June 11, 2015 | By Caroline Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 68-year-old actor who made a career playing Irish characters on stage in Philadelphia and New York City was struck by a hit-and-run driver in Center City early Tuesday. The accident forced doctors to amputate his right leg. Police know little about the accident on Market Street between 11th and 12th Streets. It happened before 1 a.m., when a passerby found Michael Toner and alerted authorities. No one reported witnessing the crash. No parts of the vehicle were found at the scene.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bloomsday, the literary celebration of James Joyce's modernist classic Ulysses , is held across the world every June 16. From Australia to Hungary, from the Czech Republic to Philadelphia, fans gather to read and discuss Joyce's allusive, poetical, musical, and often elusive work. The local Bloomsday event features a daylong reading of passages from the novel by more than 75 local men and women drawn from every walk of life at three locations - the steps of the Free Library of Philadelphia's Central Library, Rittenhouse Square, and the Rosenbach Museum & Library.
NEWS
June 11, 2015 | By Caroline Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 68-year-old actor who made a career playing Irish characters on stage in Philadelphia and New York City was struck by a hit-and-run driver in Center City early Tuesday. The accident forced doctors to amputate his right leg. Police know little about the accident on Market Street between 11th and 12th Streets. It happened before 1 a.m., when a passerby found Michael Toner and alerted authorities. No one reported witnessing the crash. No parts of the vehicle were found at the scene.
NEWS
June 11, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
THERE WASN'T a lot of information available last night on the scumbag who ran down Michael Toner early yesterday and kept driving. But there was plenty of information available on Toner, a talented actor whose love of James Joyce is well-known - he had even carried a copy of Ulysses with him as a young soldier trekking through the jungles of Vietnam. Last night, Toner, 68, was in critical condition at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, hours after someone hit him as he tried to cross a rain-soaked street in Center City.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2014 | By Zoë Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maya Lang's debut novel, The Sixteenth of June , is a literary bridge between the City of Brotherly Love and James Joyce's enigmatic masterpiece Ulysses . Set in Philadelphia, Lang's book follows a pair of brothers (and the younger brother's fiancée) through a single day, the Joycean holiday of Bloomsday, June 16, from their grandmother's funeral in the morning to their parents' extravagant Bloomsday fete in the evening, a perennial affair at the family's Delancey manse.
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Dubliners is one of the great books of the 20th century. " Bracing words from Colum McCann, a National Book Award-winning novelist ( Let the Great World Spin ). Sunday is the 100th anniversary of the publication of James Joyce's Dubliners , by the London house Grant Richards on June 15, 1914. It comes a day before Bloomsday, the day on which Joyce's Ulysses takes place. The Rosenbach Museum and Library is in the midst of a weeklong Bloomsday celebration (bit.ly/1kxQkrP)
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stately, plump, a 1922 first edition of James Joyce's Ulysses sits in state at the Rosenbach Museum and Library. And right across from it, 310 yellow rubber gloves dangle from the ceiling in a concentric spiral, bearing, in black Sharpie, the entire text of Ulysses , starting with Stately, plump on Glove 1 and, right in the center, finishing with the word Yes   on the ring finger of Glove 310. It's called Thy Father's Spirit:...
NEWS
May 19, 2013
It's hard to say whether Warren Bloom would be a bad traffic judge. That's because the job, for which Bloom is seeking the Democratic nomination on Tuesday, has virtually no prerequisites beyond possessing a pulse, living in Philadelphia, and winning a pale imitation of an election. It's somewhat easier to determine whether Bloom has, at least at times, been a bad taxpayer, a bad uncle, and a very bad rapper. That's because he owes more than $20,000 in taxes (which might be helped by a traffic judge's $91,000 salary)
FOOD
June 24, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
If you'd dropped by the double-wide townhouse that constitutes the Rosenbach Museum and Library last Wednesday, the crown jewels were on brazen display. The usual maroon sun drapes that shroud the venerable texts were flung aside; the stone, as it were, rolled away. It was Bloomsday, marking the day (June 16 in 1904, which was a Thursday , by the way) that James Joyce immortalizes in Ulysses , in large part employing images of the foods of workaday Dublin - the scent of pungent meat juices in a rowdy hall, a settling glass of Burgundy, gulls diving for crumbs of Banbury cake.
NEWS
June 17, 2004 | By Michael D. Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia read its way through James Joyce's Dublin again yesterday, as it has done every June 16 for the last dozen years. Nearly 100 local celebrities, along with lesser-known Joyce fans, took turns navigating the intricate prose of Ulysses in a public reading on the 100th anniversary of the day the novel, an epic that many consider the premier English-language novel of the 20th century, was set. The readers stood on the sidewalk in...
NEWS
June 13, 2004 | By Frank Wilson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the 20th anniversary of the events in Ulysses - thought by many the greatest novel of the 20th century - James Joyce wrote this in his notebook: "Today, 16 of June 1924 twenty years after. Will anybody remember this date. " The suggestion of doubt is uncharacteristic. Joyce may often have been short of cash, but he was rarely short of self-confidence. As it happens, he need not have worried. On Wednesday, the centenary of "Bloomsday" - that fictional day in Dublin - will be celebrated in cities around the world.
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