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Blue Cheese

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NEWS
May 5, 1991 | By Kay Raftery, Special to The Inquirer
Morgan Simpson is happy to tell you that these are his "salad days," or, more precisely, his "salad dressing days. " Simpson, of Berwyn, has been making and selling Morgan's Dressing for just more than a year now, and business is, well, mushrooming. Although he wouldn't disclose his gross sales or profits, Simpson, 40, did say that he was selling 1,100 cases a month of his dressing. At 12 jars a case and each jar retailing for $2.79 to $2.89, that would mean retail sales at the grocery-store level of about $37,500 a month.
FOOD
November 26, 2000 | By Aliza Green, FOR THE INQUIRER
Blue cheese is something one either adores or despises. Naturally, I adore it. As a preteen, I was invited along with my parents to visit friends. In the middle of their coffee table was a wheel of Stilton with crackers. All afternoon I kept going back for more of this cheese with its strange but fascinating taste and fabulous nutty aftertaste. Ever since then, I've developed regular cravings for the bold, even funky taste and super-creamy texture of the great blues. Blue cheeses owe their flavor and blue-green streaking to a blue mold.
FOOD
June 28, 1998 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Nigel White hoisted a heavy round of Stilton cheese out of its box and lovingly observed its finer traits. "Notice the nice dark crust," he said, tapping the cheese's moldy brown wall. "And it's got good blue veining. " Plastic wrap was peeled away from its round, 9-inch face, revealing an alabaster yellow surface marbled with lacy blue lines. Within moments, the air stirred with a pungent, tingly aroma. "Let it breathe," White urged, "and that blue veining will really come out. It becomes more vibrant.
FOOD
December 24, 2009
Cheese of the Month The "Roaring Forties" evokes the brutal gales that howled along 40° longitude to wreck many a tall ship against tiny King Island between Tasmania and South Australia. So why is the blue cheese named in their honor so sweet and mellow? Legend has it the straw mattresses from those ill-fated vessels washed ashore and seeded King Island's lush pastures - grasses that now nourish some of the richest milk Down Under. This decadent cow's milk blue is the ultimate proof of that.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pro athletes hit the gym to train for the big game. Jose Garces works out in the kitchen. In addition to his role as owner of Amada, Tinto, Village Whiskey, and four other Philadelphia restaurants, Garces wears the starched jacket of an Iron Chef, one of seven culinary household names who battle challengers on the Food Network. With its campily scowling "chairman," sparkling Kitchen Stadium, and flashy graphics, Iron Chef America might seem like a prime-time game show.
FOOD
September 10, 1986 | By MERLE ELLIS, Special to the Daily News
The first market I worked in when I was learning the butcher trade was the O.P. Skaggs store at the corner of 4th and Pearl street in Sioux City, Iowa. One of my first jobs was "putting up" the cheese. Every butcher shop in those days had a display of cheese on top of the meatcase. There wasn't a large variety back then, usually only a wheel of longhorn, a loaf of cheddar and one of domestic Swiss and a wheel of Maytag Blue. Maytag was the only blue cheese we carried at O.P. Skaggs.
FOOD
May 13, 1992 | By Marie Simmons, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Discovered in a popular watering hole in Buffalo, N.Y., the dangerously addictive Buffalo wing - obviously named after the place, not the animal - is a crisp, disjointed fried chicken wing coated with a fiery hot sauce and served with a blue cheese dip and celery sticks. Variations on Buffalo wings are popping up on menus in the most unlikely spots, and with some very imaginative adaptations. Mickey's, a comfortable dining spot in a Brooklyn neighborhood, serves a mean Buffalo "Burgher.
FOOD
August 27, 1986 | By Sharon MacKenzie, Special to The Inquirer
On summer's last holiday weekend, labor is celebrated best by avoiding it, a goal we not only applaud but encourage for all those home cooks whose festivities are too often observed from the confines of a hot kitchen. We therefore offer this month an Affordable Feast Cookout, which eliminates fancy frills, emphasizes good taste and provides the chance to enjoy seasonal easy living. Four people can indulge in foods both traditional and novel in this meal, whose ingredients are available in local supermarkets at a painless cost of just over $14. Here is this month's menu: Chilled Tomato-Cheese Soup Barbecued Bologna Ring With Simple Sauce Peanut Grilled Corn Blue-Cheese-Dressed Greens Chocolate Grilled Bananas All ingredients used in preparing this meal were checked for price and availability in a Philadelphia area Shop 'n Bag market.
FOOD
October 30, 1996 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
YO, CHEFS! During the football season, I love to sit down with a beer and some Buffalo wings and watch the games. I've tried making my own and sometimes they come out pretty good and other times just OK. I would like to know how Byrnes', in Port Richmond, makes theirs. They're great. Thanks. Al Dombrowski Philadelphia Dear Al, Byrnes' Tavern is famous for its Buffalo wings. Since the kitchen staff there wouldn't part with their recipe, "Ask the Chefs" dug into its own recipe file for this version, which we think you'll like.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2008 | By CAROLE KOTKIN, McClatchy Newspapers
In 1964, at the Anchor Bar in Buffalo, N.Y., owner Teresa Bellissimo received a large order of chicken wings by mistake. She deep-fried them, added hot sauce and a food phenomenon was born. They call them buffalo wings. Later she added celery sticks and blue cheese as a foil for the fiery wings. You may not have tickets to the Super Bowl, but you can relax in front of the TV and enjoy buffalo chicken wings. Frying makes for crisp skin and moist meat but requires working in small batches.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pro athletes hit the gym to train for the big game. Jose Garces works out in the kitchen. In addition to his role as owner of Amada, Tinto, Village Whiskey, and four other Philadelphia restaurants, Garces wears the starched jacket of an Iron Chef, one of seven culinary household names who battle challengers on the Food Network. With its campily scowling "chairman," sparkling Kitchen Stadium, and flashy graphics, Iron Chef America might seem like a prime-time game show.
FOOD
April 29, 2010 | By Elisa Ludwig FOR THE INQUIRER
South Philly's brunch culture began to evolve in the 1990s with the arrival of the Big Three: Sam's Morning Glory Diner, Carman's Country Kitchen, and a bit later, Sabrina's Cafe. Each set new morning-meal standards, featuring the likes of homemade sausage, local preserves, and garden-fresh veggie burgers, making the local brunch outing less a morning-after necessity and more an epicurean experience in its own right. In the last couple of years, so many new spots have sprouted that South Philly has stepped up to take on yet another culinary identity: Brunchland.
FOOD
December 24, 2009
Cheese of the Month The "Roaring Forties" evokes the brutal gales that howled along 40° longitude to wreck many a tall ship against tiny King Island between Tasmania and South Australia. So why is the blue cheese named in their honor so sweet and mellow? Legend has it the straw mattresses from those ill-fated vessels washed ashore and seeded King Island's lush pastures - grasses that now nourish some of the richest milk Down Under. This decadent cow's milk blue is the ultimate proof of that.
FOOD
April 16, 2009 | By Joyce Gemperlein FOR THE INQUIRER
They're gone for the weekend, so I've brushed aside a tear and rushed to the store for a hunk of blue cheese and a bag of onions. In general, those left behind are expected to sorrow over loved ones leaving on a short holiday. But time alone at home is a gift to cooking martyrs. Day in and day out, we considerately do not serve food that our family members dislike or are unable to eat. In my home, this would also include mushrooms, lima beans, brussels sprouts, tofu, beets, very spicy green curry, and breakfast for dinner - all of which I love.
FOOD
May 22, 2008 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
When Betts McCoy whipped up her first flavored cheese spread at her Villanova Cheese Shop in the early '70s, few noticed or made much of its being all-natural. Since then, an expanded line of those spreads has become the core business supporting the family's second and third generations. And the all-natural content and fine, fresh taste of Betts cream-cheese spreads may just be the first thing that customers take note of when they find it in gourmet shops and in chains such as Genuardi's (Betts' first big customer 10 years ago)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2008 | By CAROLE KOTKIN, McClatchy Newspapers
In 1964, at the Anchor Bar in Buffalo, N.Y., owner Teresa Bellissimo received a large order of chicken wings by mistake. She deep-fried them, added hot sauce and a food phenomenon was born. They call them buffalo wings. Later she added celery sticks and blue cheese as a foil for the fiery wings. You may not have tickets to the Super Bowl, but you can relax in front of the TV and enjoy buffalo chicken wings. Frying makes for crisp skin and moist meat but requires working in small batches.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2007
Here are some inexpensive recipes to serve at your easy party. TUSCAN CHEESE FONDUE 1 1/2 cups dry white wine, such as pinot grigio 2 large cloves garlic, minced 3 cups shredded fontina cheese 1 cup shredded Asiago or Parmesan cheese 2 tablespoons cornstarch Use any or all of these as dippers: brown cremini mushrooms, trimmed and halved; small, cooked artichoke hearts, halved; red or gold cherry tomatoes; bread...
NEWS
July 12, 2006 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Good cheese has always been one of the pillars that propped up the circus tent of the gastronomic extravaganza that is the annual Fancy Food Show. But rarely has it been a central theme in so many of the show's prizewinning products. The popularity of fine cheese has extended beyond the cheese board into mass production: in appetizers, desserts and biscuits - even a Hollywood promotion. The show's grand prize for Outstanding New Product was an extraordinary cheesecake with a pecan-shortbread crust (and a $45 online price tag)
FOOD
February 16, 2006 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The right wine showcases the best in a meal. The wrong wine displays my ignorance. And that's the long and short of My Problem With Wine. That, and so-called wine "lovers" - pedantic elitists ready to pounce on my every misstep. And a minefield of mistakes does await: vintage, color, body, storage, taste, temperature, corkage, decanters, glasses. The very geography (or terroir) of it. Is French inherently superior to Australian or Chilean? What about domestic? Which cheeses?
NEWS
December 21, 2004 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
My mother was really ahead of her time when it came to entertaining and the domestic arts. Long before Martha Stewart blessed the world with tips on bold nutmeg usage and other holiday how-tos, Bunny Hill taught us the finer points of throwing a dinner party to remember. Part of my mother's genius was that she wasn't afraid to make mistakes. Thus, Bunny's first Tip for Gracious Living: Don't put blue cheese in the lime Jell-O. The recipe called for Philadelphia cream cheese.
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