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Blue Ribbon Panel

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NEWS
January 4, 2000 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Chester County Republican Commissioners Karen Martynick and Colin Hanna are expected to announce this morning the appointment of a blue-ribbon panel that will investigate the county's budgeting process and make recommendations for improvements. They said naming the panel would fulfill a promise they made during recent contentious hearings on the county's controversial 2000 budget, which calls for a 28.4 percent tax increase, one of the largest rises in county history. "We think this will be a good way to respond to what we heard loud and clear from the citizens who attended the budget meetings," Martynick said.
NEWS
November 22, 1988 | Asterisk, Inc. / TERRY MCBRIDE
William V. Donaldson, director of the Philadelphia Zoo, was recently named to chair a blue-ribbon panel to advise Mayor Goode on ways to deal with the city's budget deficit. So perhaps this is an appropriate pose in a article about the zoo's future for Zoo One magazine, fall 1988 issue.
NEWS
April 27, 2000
Is the party over or not? As April draws to a close, emotionally exhausted investors can only hope there will never be a repeat. Three of the biggest daily percentage gains and four of the largest declines in Nasdaq's history occurred this month. No wonder people are using the word "manic" to describe what's happening. According to "Irrational Exuberance," a much-hyped new book by Yale economist Robert Schiller, we're nearing the end of an unprecedented bull market and shouldn't expect stocks to rise nearly as much in the next decade as in the last.
NEWS
March 15, 2010
THERE IS no justice in Philadelphia as long as the court system remains dysfunctional. A November Inquirer series detailing low conviction rates, at-large fugitives who thumb their noses at bail, and witness intimidation offered disheartening testimony to yet another broken instititution. It also served as a wake-up call that the state Supreme Court has heeded. Last week, Chief Justice Ronald Castille appointed Justice Seamus McCaffery to oversee a blue-ribbon panel of criminial-justice experts to review the courts and recommend fixes.
NEWS
October 5, 1996 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the ongoing Philadelphia Orchestra strike was just a few days old, the orchestra's executive committee turned down a proposal from Mayor Rendell's office to establish a blue-ribbon panel to review the performance of the orchestra's management. The proposal, rejected Sept. 21, called for the musicians to return to work while talks over a new contract continued. The blue-ribbon panel would have been empowered to hire outside consultants to evaluate the orchestra's leadership and would have had the authority to review the Orchestra Association's financial and business records.
NEWS
January 25, 1987
Regarding the study by the mayor's five-member panel of physicians concerning the environmental impact of the proposed trash-to-steam plant in South Philadelphia, I want to express my opinion. The report states that the trash-to-steam plant poses a negligible cancer risk and could produce one additional case of cancer every 388 years, whatever that means. In addition, the panel concluded that the plant can be expected to produce one additional case of cancer for every one million people.
NEWS
March 20, 2000 | by Chris Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
SEPTA is refusing to disclose how much it has paid four politically powerful attorneys so far to investigate the agency's legal department, in trouble for withholding reports and memos during a December civil trial. The transit agency also is refusing to say how much it paid outside attorneys for its failed defense in the lawsuit filed by the mother of a 4-year-old boy who had his right foot ripped off in a 1996 subway escalator accident. SEPTA's refusal to show how it is spending taxpayers' money in the escalator scandal concerns city and state lawmakers, including a state senator who serves on the agency's board of directors.
NEWS
December 12, 2010
The "blue-ribbon panel" appointed by Cardinal Justin Rigali might better be described as a "blue-haired panel" ("Archdiocese picks panel to study Catholic schools," Wednesday). The 17-member committee is composed of a retired executive of DuPont Co., several business leaders, including the chairman emeritus of Cigna Corp., a vice dean at the Wharton School, and a former vice chair of the management consulting firm PriceWaterhouseCoopers. The panel also includes "four priests and four nuns.
NEWS
October 9, 2010
As a sponsor of the Safe Schools Advocate Act and chairman of a bipartisan investigation into violence in Philadelphia schools, I share hopes that the school district's latest effort to address school violence, "Focus 46," doesn't become just another empty promise. Sadly though, while the district and state make big pronouncements, they continue to ignore laws enacted to protect victims. After establishing the Office of the Safe Schools Advocate in 2001 to give victims a voice and protection from assailants, as well as keeping the school district's feet to the fire on mandatory reporting requirements and the expulsion of violent students, the state Department of Education violated the law and closed the office in the summer of 2009.
NEWS
November 23, 1989 | By Mark E. Neumann, Special to The Inquirer
The West Whiteland Township supervisors plan to hold hearings in late January on Rouse & Associates' request for zoning changes needed by its massive Churchill residential and commercial development. They also have agreed, at the urging of some township residents, to form a blue-ribbon panel to investigate open-space alternatives for the 1,100-acre site. The board set hearing dates of Jan. 23 and Jan. 25 to hear the Rouse plan, which calls for construction of 1,800 single-family, multi-family and apartment units, 3.5 million square feet of office/warehouse space, and 200,000 square feet of commercial/retail space.
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NEWS
September 27, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Following on the recommendations of a task force created to examine the Department of Licenses and Inspections, Mayor Nutter on Thursday moved the department under the public-safety umbrella and away from commerce. To add to the message that L&I's main priority and focus should be public safety, Nutter created a new position, chief safety officer. The mayor, however, did not address the panel's foremost recommendation: to split the agency in two, an act that would require changing the City Charter.
NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Speaking publicly for the first time since they lost their daughter, Anne, in the Market Street building collapse in June, city Treasurer Nancy Winkler and her husband, John Bryan, called Tuesday for the city to convene a panel of nationally recognized experts to conduct a top-to-bottom review of the Department of Licenses and Inspections. "We believe an independent blue-ribbon panel of national safety experts . . . should look at what happened and fully evaluate what system should be in place . . . so that in the future, citizens of the city of Philadelphia can feel confident, when they walk the streets and enter buildings, that they will be safe," Winkler told reporters.
NEWS
December 12, 2010
The "blue-ribbon panel" appointed by Cardinal Justin Rigali might better be described as a "blue-haired panel" ("Archdiocese picks panel to study Catholic schools," Wednesday). The 17-member committee is composed of a retired executive of DuPont Co., several business leaders, including the chairman emeritus of Cigna Corp., a vice dean at the Wharton School, and a former vice chair of the management consulting firm PriceWaterhouseCoopers. The panel also includes "four priests and four nuns.
NEWS
October 9, 2010
As a sponsor of the Safe Schools Advocate Act and chairman of a bipartisan investigation into violence in Philadelphia schools, I share hopes that the school district's latest effort to address school violence, "Focus 46," doesn't become just another empty promise. Sadly though, while the district and state make big pronouncements, they continue to ignore laws enacted to protect victims. After establishing the Office of the Safe Schools Advocate in 2001 to give victims a voice and protection from assailants, as well as keeping the school district's feet to the fire on mandatory reporting requirements and the expulsion of violent students, the state Department of Education violated the law and closed the office in the summer of 2009.
NEWS
March 23, 2010 | By Craig R. McCoy and Nancy Phillips, Inquirer Staff Writers
Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court has moved to expand and diversify the blue-ribbon panel set up to oversee reform in the Philadelphia courts. Following complaints that the original nine-member committee was all male and too prosecution-oriented, Castille has added a top female attorney for the Pennsylvania State Police, a female judge who sits on the Philadelphia Common Pleas Court bench, and a veteran criminal defense lawyer who practices in local courts.
NEWS
March 15, 2010
THERE IS no justice in Philadelphia as long as the court system remains dysfunctional. A November Inquirer series detailing low conviction rates, at-large fugitives who thumb their noses at bail, and witness intimidation offered disheartening testimony to yet another broken instititution. It also served as a wake-up call that the state Supreme Court has heeded. Last week, Chief Justice Ronald Castille appointed Justice Seamus McCaffery to oversee a blue-ribbon panel of criminial-justice experts to review the courts and recommend fixes.
NEWS
January 25, 2008 | By John Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Department of Human Services has made significant headway in rethinking how it protects children in Philadelphia but has far to go before its reforms find their way to the streets, a panel of experts reported yesterday in the first independent review of the agency since a shake-up in 2006. The agency achieved 14 of 30 changes recommended last May by a blue-ribbon panel appointed to address failings that led to the deaths of 25 children, said Carol Spigner, who chaired both groups.
NEWS
August 30, 2005 | By Troy Graham, Adam Fifield and Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
As part of a major reorganization to be rolled out this year, Camden police will divide the city into four districts and assign a captain to be personally accountable for each area. The changes are designed to transform a department battered by criticism and best known for shuttling between 911 calls into a model for policing a medium-size city, officials said yesterday in interviews. They follow the recommendations of a panel created during a disastrous year for Camden that included a sharp spike in homicides, a serial rapist in the downtown business district, and a research firm designating the city as the "most dangerous" in America.
NEWS
November 25, 2003 | By Robert Moran and Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
New Jersey's gasoline tax should increase by 12.5 cents - effectively raising it above Pennsylvania's - to pay for new road and transit projects, a state commission recommended yesterday. Gov. McGreevey's blue-ribbon commission also recommended raising the tax and NJ Transit fares regularly to reflect inflation. Although McGreevey did not immediately endorse the increases, he said in a statement that "it is clear that we need to act quickly to replenish transportation funding.
NEWS
January 7, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Patricia Moran Baldwin, 79, former Chester County commissioner and Democratic Party activist, died of leukemia Saturday at her family's Hurricane Hill Farm in West Brandywine Township. A lifelong resident of Chester County, Mrs. Baldwin was the first woman to be elected Chester County commissioner. She served from 1984 to 1991. "Politics was her birthright," her cousin Rachel Mullin said. Mrs. Baldwin's grandparents were active in politics, and her mother, Mary Corcoran Moran, marched with the suffragists in Washington and was later a state Democratic committeewoman.
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