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Blue Spruce

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NEWS
February 21, 1991 | By Jeff McGaw, Special to The Inquirer
Unless they're falling on houses or across lanes of traffic, trees tend to maintain low public profiles. But a blue spruce near the corner of York and County Line Roads in Hatboro has achieved distinction without catastrophe. Measuring approximately 80 feet tall, with an average crown spread - the tree equivalent of an airplane's wingspan - of 39 feet and a circumference of 10 feet, 1 inch, the tree is the largest blue spruce in the state, according to Maurice Hobaugh, chairman of the Big Trees Committee for the Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry.
LIVING
December 3, 1997 | Inquirer photographs by Tom Gralish
The house on Glenn Street in the Northeast was always easy to find. "It's the house with the big tree," prospective visitors would be told. But the people who lived in the house - George and Kathy Green and their children, George 3d and Kellyanne - had been thinking of having the 50-foot blue spruce cut down - its roots were starting to get at the house's foundation. Only no one wanted to see it hauled away in pieces. Then the Greens heard that the city needed trees for holiday display.
NEWS
December 25, 1990 | By Andrew Hussie, Special to The Inquirer
Brian Chernoff's "bar mitzvah tree" is now most likely a Christmas tree. Chernoff, 24, said a neighbor telephoned him early yesterday to tell him that a 10-foot blue spruce on his front lawn in Melrose Park had been chopped down. Chernoff placed a value of about $400 on the tree, but said its sentimental value went far deeper. "It was planted about 12 years ago to commemorate my bar mitzvah," said Chernoff. "I know it's not in the spirit of Christmas. . . . This is just terrible that someone would do something like this.
NEWS
December 23, 1990 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
As superintendent of the Wallingford-Swarthmore School District, George Slick is well known to students. They have seen him at school concerts, plays and sports events. But one side of Slick is quite removed from academia. He grows Christmas trees. "When I was 16, I worked on a Christmas tree plantation in Fulton County, Pennsylvania, during the summer," he said. "I was responsible for pruning and keeping the grass down around the trees, and I discovered I liked working with trees.
NEWS
December 20, 2001 | By Patricia Ann Florio
For 30 years, it has been my job and adventure to find the biggest Christmas tree in creation for our living rooms. I remember trying to hold on to my twin sons through the mud of various outdoor tree emporiums. I would always just manage to grab an article of their clothing, as they were eager to escape my grip. Like wild monkeys being set free, Anthony and Joseph would eye the 15-foot spruces. That was 25 years ago at our first home on Staten Island. Our living room had 20-foot ceilings with a loft and balcony that made it easy to decorate the upper sections of the tree and place the star on top. Shopping for a 15-foot spruce became our family tradition for almost 10 years.
NEWS
September 20, 2003 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It took Nick Christine and Alan Jensen-Sellers just 12 minutes to dispatch the 20-foot blue spruce that until Hurricane Isabel had stood in a yard on Sugartown Road in Malvern. When the yammer of the chipper-shredder subsided, all that was left was a pile of gray-green sawdust and the smell of Christmas trees. "It's disappointing," Jensen-Sellers said solemnly as the arborist watched the last of the toppled tree disappear into the chipper's maw. The evergreen had graced the yard for 15 years.
LIVING
February 15, 1987 | By Jane Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
Most of us buy a house because we like the neighborhood, the schools, perhaps the kitchen, or even the front porch. Bill Thomas purchased his first house because he couldn't resist the highly unusual landscaping. Lining the front driveway were about 40 plastic trees, each one set in cement. Even Thomas, assistant head of the education department at Longwood Gardens, Kennett Square, had a difficult time identifying the species, but he settled on Scotch pine. Conifers, or needled evergreens, have always been a favorite group of plants for Thomas.
NEWS
May 15, 1994 | By Edward Engel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
There are thousands of them - Norway spruce, white pine, Douglas fir and blue spruce - and they are lined up, six feet high, like soldiers across Albert Brown Jr.'s tree farm. But as you drive past Brown's 15-acre farm on Old Egg Harbor Road, past the house he has called home for close to four decades, it is another tree that catches your eye. It's big. You won't see it in the fields with the Christmas trees. And it's not for sale, thank you. The tree in question sits plunk center in Brown's back yard, a knobby white mulberry stretching heavenward like a grotesque catcher's mitt.
NEWS
December 5, 2002 | By Linda K. Harris INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
10-9-8-7 . . .. That wasn't the temperature dropping, though it felt that cold yesterday as city officials flipped on the Christmas tree lights at City Hall. A bundled-up crowd packed Dilworth Plaza as the 40-foot blue spruce, decorated with strings of white lights and giant blue and purple bulbs, suddenly bedazzled the dark. "They look like bowling balls," an excited Thomas Dickerson, 13, of North Philadelphia, said. The City Hall ceremony is one of two traditional tree-lightings in Center City, though Mayor Street has expanded the idea and will light trees in 11 neighborhoods this year.
NEWS
June 10, 1996 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When the Rev. Anselmo Florio began his yearly ritual a week ago today, he had only an empty floor and "a very big faith. " With the help of dozens of parishioners at the St. John Neumann Church who spent endless hours snipping, cutting, plucking and placing, Father Florio's faith has bloomed again. With the bounty of the natural world used as a palette, from the lush blue hue of spruce needles to the dragon's-blood depth of sumac flowers, seven scenes of religious inspiration were assembled on the auditorium floor at St. John Neumann into an intricate, 80-foot-long carpet of flowers in honor of the Feast of Corpus Christi.
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NEWS
December 8, 2012 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brothers Horace and Frank Somes are gearing up for the busiest weekend of the year at the farm their family has worked for more than a century on the edge of the Pinelands in lower Burlington County. They are Christmas tree farmers, and their spread in Wading River, Washington Township, is a place where traditions are born and memories are made. "We'll be hustling all day long," said Frank Somes, 61, who retired a year ago from the Burlington County Highway Department. "It's a great job to see the families coming out with the kids.
NEWS
September 20, 2003 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It took Nick Christine and Alan Jensen-Sellers just 12 minutes to dispatch the 20-foot blue spruce that until Hurricane Isabel had stood in a yard on Sugartown Road in Malvern. When the yammer of the chipper-shredder subsided, all that was left was a pile of gray-green sawdust and the smell of Christmas trees. "It's disappointing," Jensen-Sellers said solemnly as the arborist watched the last of the toppled tree disappear into the chipper's maw. The evergreen had graced the yard for 15 years.
NEWS
December 5, 2002 | By Linda K. Harris INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
10-9-8-7 . . .. That wasn't the temperature dropping, though it felt that cold yesterday as city officials flipped on the Christmas tree lights at City Hall. A bundled-up crowd packed Dilworth Plaza as the 40-foot blue spruce, decorated with strings of white lights and giant blue and purple bulbs, suddenly bedazzled the dark. "They look like bowling balls," an excited Thomas Dickerson, 13, of North Philadelphia, said. The City Hall ceremony is one of two traditional tree-lightings in Center City, though Mayor Street has expanded the idea and will light trees in 11 neighborhoods this year.
NEWS
December 20, 2001 | By Patricia Ann Florio
For 30 years, it has been my job and adventure to find the biggest Christmas tree in creation for our living rooms. I remember trying to hold on to my twin sons through the mud of various outdoor tree emporiums. I would always just manage to grab an article of their clothing, as they were eager to escape my grip. Like wild monkeys being set free, Anthony and Joseph would eye the 15-foot spruces. That was 25 years ago at our first home on Staten Island. Our living room had 20-foot ceilings with a loft and balcony that made it easy to decorate the upper sections of the tree and place the star on top. Shopping for a 15-foot spruce became our family tradition for almost 10 years.
NEWS
November 30, 2000 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the Reeds, a 1986 Mother's Day snapshot suddenly has more poignancy. There's mother Kathy standing with Michelle, then 5, and Bob, then 1 1/2. And there, just behind them, in front of the porch, is a scrawny little blue spruce, less than five feet tall. Over the years, the children grew. Michelle, 20, is in college. Bob is 16. But the tree grew faster. It got to be a lush 25 feet high. Its branches began to block the front walk. Its roots were surely threatening the septic system.
LIVING
December 3, 1997 | Inquirer photographs by Tom Gralish
The house on Glenn Street in the Northeast was always easy to find. "It's the house with the big tree," prospective visitors would be told. But the people who lived in the house - George and Kathy Green and their children, George 3d and Kellyanne - had been thinking of having the 50-foot blue spruce cut down - its roots were starting to get at the house's foundation. Only no one wanted to see it hauled away in pieces. Then the Greens heard that the city needed trees for holiday display.
NEWS
June 10, 1996 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When the Rev. Anselmo Florio began his yearly ritual a week ago today, he had only an empty floor and "a very big faith. " With the help of dozens of parishioners at the St. John Neumann Church who spent endless hours snipping, cutting, plucking and placing, Father Florio's faith has bloomed again. With the bounty of the natural world used as a palette, from the lush blue hue of spruce needles to the dragon's-blood depth of sumac flowers, seven scenes of religious inspiration were assembled on the auditorium floor at St. John Neumann into an intricate, 80-foot-long carpet of flowers in honor of the Feast of Corpus Christi.
NEWS
May 15, 1994 | By Edward Engel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
There are thousands of them - Norway spruce, white pine, Douglas fir and blue spruce - and they are lined up, six feet high, like soldiers across Albert Brown Jr.'s tree farm. But as you drive past Brown's 15-acre farm on Old Egg Harbor Road, past the house he has called home for close to four decades, it is another tree that catches your eye. It's big. You won't see it in the fields with the Christmas trees. And it's not for sale, thank you. The tree in question sits plunk center in Brown's back yard, a knobby white mulberry stretching heavenward like a grotesque catcher's mitt.
NEWS
November 27, 1991 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press, the New York Post and the Washington Post contributed to this report
Ruben Blades yesterday took what some observers see as his first step toward a 1994 Panamanian presidential bid by applying to Panama's Electoral Tribunal to form a new political party. The musical star, who helped popularize the salsa sound in this country and who starred in the movies The Super and The Milagro Beanfield War, has noted his political ambitions since at least 1987. He told reporters that his proposed party is "a movement that will have a pluralistic democratic base and . . . will defend the needs of the people.
NEWS
February 21, 1991 | By Jeff McGaw, Special to The Inquirer
Unless they're falling on houses or across lanes of traffic, trees tend to maintain low public profiles. But a blue spruce near the corner of York and County Line Roads in Hatboro has achieved distinction without catastrophe. Measuring approximately 80 feet tall, with an average crown spread - the tree equivalent of an airplane's wingspan - of 39 feet and a circumference of 10 feet, 1 inch, the tree is the largest blue spruce in the state, according to Maurice Hobaugh, chairman of the Big Trees Committee for the Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry.
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