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Blue Suede Shoes

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1986 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
The way Carl Perkins had it figured, he was all set to "ease on up to the lake house," taking his fishing pole and his hunting dogs with him, and live out the rest of his natural life in the backwoods of his home state, Tennessee. The man had decided to call it quits - the man who practically invented rockabilly; the man who went to the top of the country, pop and R&B charts in 1956 with a single that sold 2 million copies, a song called "Blue Suede Shoes"; the man whose twanging electric guitar has inspired a couple of generations' worth of rock-and-rollers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences has chosen five records for inclusion in the academy's Hall of Fame during the 1985 Grammy Awards ceremony Feb. 25. The four pop songs and one Bach collection, all recorded before the Grammy Awards were instituted in 1958, were selected by a 96-member committee composed of music historians and others with expertise in the record business. They are: "A-Tisket, A-Tasket," by Chick Webb and his orchestra featuring Ella Fitzgerald.
NEWS
January 8, 1988 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
Several music historians have suggested that Elvis Presley stomped all over Carl Perkins' career, robbed Perkins of his status as the primo rockabilly cat when El recorded "Blue Suede Shoes" - the national anthem of rockabilly, which Perkins wrote and first recorded in 1956. But Perkins, appearing this weekend in Atlantic City at the Showboat's Elvis Presley birthday extravaganza, says the history books done got it wrong. "Unfortuntely, I didn't find out until after Elvis had died that he held off recording 'Blue Suede Shoes' until my version had gone its course - to No. 1 on the R&B and country charts, and two or three on the pop charts," said the gray-haired rocker.
NEWS
January 20, 1998 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Carl Perkins, the rockabilly pioneer whose significant stylistic innovations were overshadowed by his song "Blue Suede Shoes," died yesterday of complications related to a series of strokes. The tall, gregarious Mr. Perkins, who was 65, suffered three strokes in November and December. He was admitted several times to Jackson-Madison County General Hospital in Jackson, Tenn., near his home, and died there at 10:30 a.m. Mr. Perkins was more than the author of one of rock and roll's landmark songs.
NEWS
January 21, 2002
Stores go, but memories stay News of the demolition of buildings that once housed Grant's, Woolworth's, and Hanover shoes brought a flood of memories of center-city Camden, once the hub of retail activity. At the age of 19, I purchased my first suit at Bratis Men's Clothing store, then visited Hanover next door for a pair of blue suede shoes - a few years before Elvis made them popular. At age 30, I bought a layette for our first child from a very helpful salesperson at Grant's.
NEWS
June 30, 1987 | By MEGAN O'MATZ, Special to the Daily News
While most state lawmakers were busy battling a midnight state budget deadline, two legislators took time out yesterday to sing the praises of Elvis Presley. State Reps. Keith R. McCall, D-Carbon, and Joseph M. Gladeck Jr., R- Montgomery, used the Rotunda of the Capitol to proclaim Aug. 16, the 10th anniversary of Elvis' death, as "Elvis Presley Day" in the state. An Elvis impersonator was there but did not sing because "Elvis never sang in a state capitol without a band, so I can't either.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1989 | Staff writer Barbara Beck, the Washington Post, New York Daily News, People Magazine and Associated Press contributed to this report
DON'T FORGET FRIO Among this week's emotional resignations (House Speaker Jim Wright), tearful retirements (Mike Schmidt) and spectacular final performances (Gunther Gebel-Williams), you might have forgotten about Alan Frio. Last night was his last day in the newsroom. "I know what Mike Schmidt's going through," said Frio, who yesterday ended his career as a Channel 10 anchor. He's moving to Los Angeles to host "Tabloid," a new syndicated TV show that will air on Channel 10 in the fall.
NEWS
June 30, 1998 | By Geoff Mulvihill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It is the wee hours at the 70 West Night Club in Cherry Hill, and the crowd is calling for Mark McMichael's Elvis windmill move. Without hesitation, McMichael drops to a crouch, grabs the mike with his left hand, and swings his right arm - like a windmill - at his side. It is one of his favorite Elvis maneuvers. There are only about 15 people in the audience. Many are oblivious to McMichael's even being on stage. But this, as McMichael, 39, of Voorhees, sees it, could be a step on the path to a Las Vegas gig - or at least a Letterman appearance - so don't you step on his blue suede shoes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2011 | By Adrian Sainz, Associated Press
MEMPHIS, Tenn. - Elvis Presley fans love an anniversary. Every year, thousands of Elvis devotees flock to Memphis to remember the singer's death on Aug. 16, 1977. The main event of "Elvis Week" is the solemn candlelight vigil at Graceland, his longtime home, at midnight Tuesday. This year, fans have something else to commemorate. It was 55 years ago - 1956 - that Elvis' first two albums were released, launching an international music career that brought his mix of country, rhythm and blues, and gospel to millions of fans around the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
We at "SideShow" love, love, wuvvvv the Internets! They supply us with lovely fun for moments at a time. Guess who's the new viral hero of the Web! If you answered Mr. Rogers , you . . . read ahead! Fred McFeely Rogers , whose show Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood went from 1968 to 2001 and whose life went from 1928 to 2003, is now a viral bomb, yo. Back in May 1969, he appeared before the U.S. Senate to defend PBS; President Richard M. Nixon wanted to cut its $20 million grant in half.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
We at "SideShow" love, love, wuvvvv the Internets! They supply us with lovely fun for moments at a time. Guess who's the new viral hero of the Web! If you answered Mr. Rogers , you . . . read ahead! Fred McFeely Rogers , whose show Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood went from 1968 to 2001 and whose life went from 1928 to 2003, is now a viral bomb, yo. Back in May 1969, he appeared before the U.S. Senate to defend PBS; President Richard M. Nixon wanted to cut its $20 million grant in half.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2011 | By Adrian Sainz, Associated Press
MEMPHIS, Tenn. - Elvis Presley fans love an anniversary. Every year, thousands of Elvis devotees flock to Memphis to remember the singer's death on Aug. 16, 1977. The main event of "Elvis Week" is the solemn candlelight vigil at Graceland, his longtime home, at midnight Tuesday. This year, fans have something else to commemorate. It was 55 years ago - 1956 - that Elvis' first two albums were released, launching an international music career that brought his mix of country, rhythm and blues, and gospel to millions of fans around the world.
LIVING
April 26, 2002 | By Diane Goldsmith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mention Elvis, and his bedroom eyes spring to mind. But does the name get you thinking about buying a bedroom set? Vaughan-Bassett Furniture Co., which just debuted its Elvis Presley Collection at the spring International Home Furnishings Market, is hoping consumers will make the leap when the line comes to stores in August. The traditional and retro-'60s bedroom collection - with the heart-shaped "Burning Love" mirror and the Victorian cherry "Love Me Tender" bed - was aswarm with store buyers as market opened last week with the new lines for fall.
NEWS
January 21, 2002
Stores go, but memories stay News of the demolition of buildings that once housed Grant's, Woolworth's, and Hanover shoes brought a flood of memories of center-city Camden, once the hub of retail activity. At the age of 19, I purchased my first suit at Bratis Men's Clothing store, then visited Hanover next door for a pair of blue suede shoes - a few years before Elvis made them popular. At age 30, I bought a layette for our first child from a very helpful salesperson at Grant's.
NEWS
June 30, 1998 | By Geoff Mulvihill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It is the wee hours at the 70 West Night Club in Cherry Hill, and the crowd is calling for Mark McMichael's Elvis windmill move. Without hesitation, McMichael drops to a crouch, grabs the mike with his left hand, and swings his right arm - like a windmill - at his side. It is one of his favorite Elvis maneuvers. There are only about 15 people in the audience. Many are oblivious to McMichael's even being on stage. But this, as McMichael, 39, of Voorhees, sees it, could be a step on the path to a Las Vegas gig - or at least a Letterman appearance - so don't you step on his blue suede shoes.
NEWS
January 20, 1998 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Carl Perkins, the rockabilly pioneer whose significant stylistic innovations were overshadowed by his song "Blue Suede Shoes," died yesterday of complications related to a series of strokes. The tall, gregarious Mr. Perkins, who was 65, suffered three strokes in November and December. He was admitted several times to Jackson-Madison County General Hospital in Jackson, Tenn., near his home, and died there at 10:30 a.m. Mr. Perkins was more than the author of one of rock and roll's landmark songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1997 | By Jeff Gammage, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The crowd falls silent as the first orchestral strains of Also Sprach Zarathustra pierce the showroom, the stage bare but for a lone microphone. Suddenly a figure in white boots and dark glasses bounds onto the platform, his gold-studded cape flaring behind, and the audience explodes in applause for their one and only: Paul Butler, a school bus driver from Anderson, Ind. You were expecting someone else? Not in this town. Not this week. Elvis may have left the building, but scores of impersonators have arrived to take his place, performing at nightclubs, hotels and bars across the Bluff City.
NEWS
August 26, 1996 | By Allie Shah, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They had seen him before, downstairs in the basement, but on Friday, employees at the Chester County Courthouse saw parole officer Mark Gonsalves in a new light. They saw him as Elvis. As the lead singer in a new rock band, known as Elvis and the Lawmen II, Gonsalves and six other law enforcement officers gave a mini-concert in the courtyard for an audience that included the county commissioners, law clerks and a few judges. Dressed in a white T-shirt, worn Levis and steel-toed cowboy boots, Gonsalves sounded like, but didn't look like, the King.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1989 | Staff writer Barbara Beck, the Washington Post, New York Daily News, People Magazine and Associated Press contributed to this report
DON'T FORGET FRIO Among this week's emotional resignations (House Speaker Jim Wright), tearful retirements (Mike Schmidt) and spectacular final performances (Gunther Gebel-Williams), you might have forgotten about Alan Frio. Last night was his last day in the newsroom. "I know what Mike Schmidt's going through," said Frio, who yesterday ended his career as a Channel 10 anchor. He's moving to Los Angeles to host "Tabloid," a new syndicated TV show that will air on Channel 10 in the fall.
NEWS
August 20, 1988 | By Patrick Ercolano
They have it all wrong about the King. No doubt you've heard these new reports that Elvis Presley is alive, reasonably well and pigging out at hamburger joints all over the map. His death was a hoax, people say. A new book has him living under a federal witness program protecting him from Mafia hit men. There's even a theory that Elvis is involved in yet another protection program, this one hiding him from people who want to steal strands of...
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