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Bluegrass Music

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NEWS
March 12, 2006 | Inquirer staff
What it is: The man often called the elder statesman of old-time bluegrass music is coming to Sellersville. Ralph Stanley, who won a Grammy Award in 2002 for hisa cappella version of "O Death" on the soundtrack of O Brother, Where Art Thou?, will headline a concert Friday at the Sellersville Theater. Stanley, 79, has been picking his banjo and singing for 55 years, performing on more than 170 albums. Born and still living in Dickenson County, Va., Stanley also has written many songs, and - with his brother, the late Carter Stanley - he toured the United States and abroad, including several stints in Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2001 | By DAVID BLEILER and DAVID GORGOS For the Daily News
THROUGHOUT THEIR CAREER, the Coen brothers have taken different regions of America (melancholy rural Minnesota in "Fargo," suburban Arizona in "Raising Arizona") and twisted the dialects into their own uniquely funny screenplays. With "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" (VHS: priced for rental; DVD: $29.99), they dive into Depression-era Mississippi and dissect not only the speech but also the bluegrass music of the region. The music, played by the fictional Soggy Bottom Boys in the movie, has led to a platinum-selling soundtrack, most unusual for traditional folk music.
NEWS
June 7, 1992 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It will be a day of bluegrass and roses when the Festival of Fountains opens this Saturday at Longwood Gardens. The day-long celebration will combine entertainment by local bluegrass bands and the 32d annual spring show of the Del-Chester Rose Society. "This year, we are calling our show 'Roses Singing the Blues,' " laughed Elaine Adler, the show chairwoman. Adler said her group was happy to have a bluegrass theme for its sixth show held at Longwood. "The show will feature seven artistic classes in which roses will be used in arrangements that interpret bluegrass themes," she said.
NEWS
September 4, 1987 | By TOM COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Bluegrass music has been described by one aficianado as "country music that they'd play on Channel 12. " Sort of highbrow high-falutin'. Twang with talent. Whatever, some of the best bluegrass bands in the country will be in this area over the weekend for the Delaware Bluegrass Festival, beginning tonight at Gloryland Park in Glasgow, Del. There should be string pluckin' enough for all with programs that run from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. tonight, from noon to 11:30 p.m. tomorrow and from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on Sunday.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | By Don Cunningham, Special to The Inquirer
Plunk-plunk. Click. Smack. The plunky sound of banjos drifted through the hallways. The clickity-clack of clogs slapping the tile floor came from the cafeteria. A cacophony of instruments, shoes and voices erupted in the halls of Plymouth-Whitemarsh High School last weekend during the 15th edition of the Philadelphia Bluegrass and Old Time Music Festival. The Philadelphia Folksong Society transformed the school into a mecca of folk song and dance as it kicked open the doors to dancers, musicians and listeners of all ages.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Montgomery Media presents the 17th annual Baby & Toddler Expo at the Greater Philadelphia Expo Center in Oaks from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Performances on both days include the Petting Zoo Puppet Show with puppeteer Abby London and magician Sam Singer. On Saturday, singer and caricaturist David C. Perry will perform his Drawings, Songs, & Silliness concert. There will also be a diaper derby and inflatable play park for kids. On Friday from noon to 2 p.m., games and prizes will be provided by mascot Buzzbee and the B101 B-crew.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1993 | By Lee Winfrey, INQUIRER TV WRITER
Like Jimmie Rodgers, Hank Williams and Willie Nelson, Bill Monroe is one of the giants of country music. But he enjoys a distinction they do not: He created a specialized form of country music all by himself. Monroe's creation, bluegrass, is country's equivalent of chamber music. Tightly organized, played with pointillistic precision, often delivered at hyper-speed, it is the most instrumentally demanding of country's several musical branches. Rugged and strong, stern and uncompromising, Monroe began creating bluegrass during the Depression and perfected it during the Truman era. With enough accumulated laurels to comfort him like a feather bed, he chooses to remain active at age 81, presenting his specialty at 100 to 150 concerts per year.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
The Walnut Street Theatre Co. today announced a tentative schedule for the 1987-88 season in conjunction with the launching of its annual subscription campaign. The initial offering for the Walnut's 5th season as a regional producing company is listed as the Michael Frayn backstage comedy "Noises Off" (Oct. 24-Nov. 22), to be followed by the Jule Styne-Bob Merrill-Isobel Lennart musical, "Funny Girl" (Dec. 5-Jan. 3), based on the life of comedienne Fanny Brice. The season moves briskly into the new year with "The Admirable Crichton" (Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1989 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Heartland rocker Gene Ryder doesn't mean a hill of beans in this town, 'cause his freshly minted debut Mercury album hasn't yet gotten any exposure on the airwaves. Progressive string band pickers The Horseflies are known only in the folk community, from their appearances at folk festivals and on specialty radio shows. But trust me on this one - the double billing of Gene Ryder and The Horseflies at the Chestnut Cabaret Saturday night will deliver a full measure of juicy music for those who dare to explore the great unknown.
NEWS
June 13, 2010
10 for the Road 1. Pittsburgh Three Rivers Regatta. Pittsburgh. July 3-4. Watch powerboat races; land, air and water entertainment; concerts; and the city's Flashes of Freedom fireworks. 412-281-7711; www.threeriversregatta.net . 2. Harbor Fireworks Cruise. Baltimore. July 4. A three-hour Inner Harbor cruise to enjoy the city's skyline and the holiday fireworks. 410-268-7601; www.watermarkcruises.com/eventsfireworkscruise.htm . 3. Windfest. Davis, W.Va.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | BY MARY SYDNOR, For the Daily News
FRIDAY NIGHT in Wilmington, Béla Fleck will join six other banjo greats for the New York Banjo Summit, the second stop in a fall tour across the East Coast. The term "banjo summit" may conjure images of porch-venue bluegrass concerts of yesteryear, but this isn't just an homage to America's past. The tour, which got under way Thursday at the Keswick Theatre, in Glenside, also will include virtuosos Tony Trischka, Bill Keith, Noam Pikelny, Richie Stearns, Eric Weissberg and Pete Wernick.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Montgomery Media presents the 17th annual Baby & Toddler Expo at the Greater Philadelphia Expo Center in Oaks from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Performances on both days include the Petting Zoo Puppet Show with puppeteer Abby London and magician Sam Singer. On Saturday, singer and caricaturist David C. Perry will perform his Drawings, Songs, & Silliness concert. There will also be a diaper derby and inflatable play park for kids. On Friday from noon to 2 p.m., games and prizes will be provided by mascot Buzzbee and the B101 B-crew.
NEWS
October 3, 2010
10 for the Road 1. Arts Alive! Pittsburgh. Oct. 23. Celebrate National Arts & Humanities Month at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art with storytelling, art projects, and music. 724-837-1500; wmuseumaa.org. 2. Citizens for a Better Eastern Shore Bike Tour and Oyster Roast. Onancock, Va. Oct. 23. Bike through the scenic Delmarva peninsula on routes ranging from 25 to 100 miles, then relax at an oyster roast with live bluegrass music. 757-678-7157, www.cbes.
NEWS
March 30, 2008 | By J. Eric Eckard FOR THE INQUIRER
Rita Forrester gets misty-eyed thinking about the people she has met over the years - people who have come to this tiny town in southwestern Virginia to see where today's country music got started. She remembers two teenage boys from Chicago - "city folk," she calls them - who ventured south to find the roots of country music. "They were going to make a circle - go to Nashville, then down to Meridian, Miss., where the Jimmie Rodgers Museum is, and then come back to us for our Saturday night show," says Forrester, who runs the Carter Family Fold here.
NEWS
February 17, 2008 | By Ed Mahon FOR THE INQUIRER
As fellow Lansdowne Folk Club audience members grow grayer, 61-year-old Jim Klingler is more interested in the changes he sees in the performers. "Many of the new performers are getting younger and younger. So it's really exciting," Klingler said of the folk club, which he has supported since it began hosting monthly performances at the borough's Twentieth Century Club in 1993. Dedicated music enthusiasts such as Klingler, a Villanova University professor who hosts smaller monthly jam sessions in his Lansdowne home, are why the folk club was able to start its 15th season last month.
NEWS
May 3, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Good-natured and entertaining, A Murder, A Mystery & A Marriage - a faux-folksy bluegrass musical - features lots of Philly talent: written by Aaron Posner with music by James Sugg, and with Ben Dibble, Scott Greer, Erin Weaver and Anthony Lawton onstage. The Delaware Theatre Company audience seemed to be having a fine time at this world premiere. The plot, based on a Mark Twain story of the same name, concerns a backwoods town called Deer Lick, Mo., "on a meander of the mighty Mississippi.
NEWS
March 12, 2006 | Inquirer staff
What it is: The man often called the elder statesman of old-time bluegrass music is coming to Sellersville. Ralph Stanley, who won a Grammy Award in 2002 for hisa cappella version of "O Death" on the soundtrack of O Brother, Where Art Thou?, will headline a concert Friday at the Sellersville Theater. Stanley, 79, has been picking his banjo and singing for 55 years, performing on more than 170 albums. Born and still living in Dickenson County, Va., Stanley also has written many songs, and - with his brother, the late Carter Stanley - he toured the United States and abroad, including several stints in Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2001 | By DAVID BLEILER and DAVID GORGOS For the Daily News
THROUGHOUT THEIR CAREER, the Coen brothers have taken different regions of America (melancholy rural Minnesota in "Fargo," suburban Arizona in "Raising Arizona") and twisted the dialects into their own uniquely funny screenplays. With "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" (VHS: priced for rental; DVD: $29.99), they dive into Depression-era Mississippi and dissect not only the speech but also the bluegrass music of the region. The music, played by the fictional Soggy Bottom Boys in the movie, has led to a platinum-selling soundtrack, most unusual for traditional folk music.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1993 | By Lee Winfrey, INQUIRER TV WRITER
Like Jimmie Rodgers, Hank Williams and Willie Nelson, Bill Monroe is one of the giants of country music. But he enjoys a distinction they do not: He created a specialized form of country music all by himself. Monroe's creation, bluegrass, is country's equivalent of chamber music. Tightly organized, played with pointillistic precision, often delivered at hyper-speed, it is the most instrumentally demanding of country's several musical branches. Rugged and strong, stern and uncompromising, Monroe began creating bluegrass during the Depression and perfected it during the Truman era. With enough accumulated laurels to comfort him like a feather bed, he chooses to remain active at age 81, presenting his specialty at 100 to 150 concerts per year.
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