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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014
WE'RE ALL the same on the inside, right? Well, sort of. As human beings, we certainly have more in common than not, but when it comes to genetics and our bodies there's a wide range of differences. For years, I have debated with readers, friends and family members about the onerous body mass index, and specifically as it relates to African-Americans. When it comes to blacks, is the BMI accurate? After all, the established standards for the BMI are based on whites, and this bias, more often than not, places many African-Americans in the overweight or obese category (even when we're not)
NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A government panel renewed a call Monday for every adult to be screened for obesity during checkups, suggesting more physicians should be routinely calculating their patients' body mass index, or BMI, a measure of whether you're overweight, obese or just right considering your height. Some doctors have begun calling BMI a vital sign, as crucial to monitor as blood pressure, but apparently not enough doctors check. And when someone crosses the line into obesity, the doctor needs to do more than mention a diet.
NEWS
September 23, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do you know your Quetelet Index? You may, but perhaps you call it Body Mass Index. The nifty ratio - weight divided by the square of height - was invented in the mid-1800s by Belgian social scientist Adolphe Quetelet. But its use as an indicator of obesity-related health risks dates to a 1972 journal article by American scientist Ancel Keys, the man who renamed it. "Ancel Keys' emphasis was on cardiovascular disease," said physician Rexford Ahima of the University of Pennsylvania's Institute for Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.
NEWS
October 20, 1996 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Are there many more fat men than women in this country? Or is there something wrong with the Body Mass Index, the standard used to calculate our collective corpulence? A lot of men with big BMIs are sure it's the latter. Around water coolers across America last week, men pounded a new government report that says more than half of Americans - 59 percent of men and 49 percent of women - are too heavy because their BMIs are over 25. The truth of the matter, obesity experts say, is that Americans of both genders keep larding it on, but the BMI can be a misleading measure - especially for men. "University of Michigan football players have BMIs of 30, and none of them are obese," said Adam Drewnowski, an obesity expert at the University of Michigan.
LIVING
June 5, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Parents could soon be in for a surprise when they take their children for a medical checkup. Besides hearing about their child's latest weight and height in terms of pounds and inches and percentiles, they may find the doctor or nurse talking about something called "BMI. " For some, the bragging rights of having a youngster in the 95th percentile may turn into a cause for concern. That's because the federal government last week released new pediatric growth charts that make use of a weight assessment tool that is already being used for adults - body mass index.
NEWS
November 8, 1996 | BY JEFFREY GOLD
In the article "Lard have Mercy! We're way too heavy" (Oct. 16), which uses weight and stature for calculating a height-normalized index, it was stated that Body Mass Index values over 25 are to be considered too fat. This is quite clearly false information. A BMI greater than 25 can pose the risk for coronary heart disease, cancer and diabetes, but BMI clearly gives no estimation of fat vs. lean body mass separately. Therefore, it does not discriminate between an athlete or an overfat person.
NEWS
September 12, 2005 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Many young Pennsylvania students will be learning their BMIs this year along with their ABCs. The ritual of checking into the nurse's office to be weighed and measured will have a new twist as most of the state's elementary school students are evaluated for the first time using a growth screening tool called Body Mass Index. The school nurse will still record that a fourth-grade girl stands 4 feet, 5 inches and weighs 77 pounds, but will also use those numbers to compute the child's BMI and plot them on a growth chart for her age and gender.
NEWS
January 8, 2003 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Packing on too many extra pounds, especially in early adulthood, can shorten your life. Two studies published this week suggest that life expectancy decreases as excess body mass grows. A severely obese 20-year-old white man can expect to lose 13 years of life, and a similarly obese black man could lose up to 20 years of life, compared with a normal-weight peer, according to research in today's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Even a slightly overweight young adult white male may lose a year off his life.
NEWS
August 2, 2010
By Patrick Basham and John Luik The fat police are coming to a doctor's office near you. Under the terms of last year's federal stimulus package, new federal regulations require that an obesity rating must be part of every American's electronic health records by 2014. The most common measure of whether a person is overweight or obese, and hence his or her obesity rating, is derived from weight and height and known as the Body Mass Index, or BMI. Because it's easy to apply, the BMI is used almost universally to define obesity - despite its manifest shortcomings.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's known as the obesity paradox: Hundreds of studies have linked excess weight to higher risk of deadly conditions such as diabetes, heart failure, and cancer. Yet numerous other studies have found that low-level obesity has no effect on mortality risk, and that being overweight actually lowers it. In a new paper, Andrew Stokes proposes a simple way to resolve the issue, with sobering results - 33 percent of the deaths in his data were attributable to overweight and obesity. Why the difference?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's known as the obesity paradox: Hundreds of studies have linked excess weight to higher risk of deadly conditions such as diabetes, heart failure, and cancer. Yet numerous other studies have found that low-level obesity has no effect on mortality risk, and that being overweight actually lowers it. In a new paper, Andrew Stokes proposes a simple way to resolve the issue, with sobering results - 33 percent of the deaths in his data were attributable to overweight and obesity. Why the difference?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014
WE'RE ALL the same on the inside, right? Well, sort of. As human beings, we certainly have more in common than not, but when it comes to genetics and our bodies there's a wide range of differences. For years, I have debated with readers, friends and family members about the onerous body mass index, and specifically as it relates to African-Americans. When it comes to blacks, is the BMI accurate? After all, the established standards for the BMI are based on whites, and this bias, more often than not, places many African-Americans in the overweight or obese category (even when we're not)
NEWS
September 23, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do you know your Quetelet Index? You may, but perhaps you call it Body Mass Index. The nifty ratio - weight divided by the square of height - was invented in the mid-1800s by Belgian social scientist Adolphe Quetelet. But its use as an indicator of obesity-related health risks dates to a 1972 journal article by American scientist Ancel Keys, the man who renamed it. "Ancel Keys' emphasis was on cardiovascular disease," said physician Rexford Ahima of the University of Pennsylvania's Institute for Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013
HEY, "FAMILY GUY" Peter Griffin: Ditch those weight-loss resolutions - being a Fatty Fat Fatty may not be so bad after all. According to a study released last week by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, people who were overweight, defined as a body mass index of 25 to 29.9, were less likely to die prematurely than people of normal weight (a BMI of 18.5 to 24.9). I scratched my head and laughed when I read this one. Here's the thing, folks: This report was about death rates, which aren't the same as life expectancy or longevity.
NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A government panel renewed a call Monday for every adult to be screened for obesity during checkups, suggesting more physicians should be routinely calculating their patients' body mass index, or BMI, a measure of whether you're overweight, obese or just right considering your height. Some doctors have begun calling BMI a vital sign, as crucial to monitor as blood pressure, but apparently not enough doctors check. And when someone crosses the line into obesity, the doctor needs to do more than mention a diet.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2012 | By Diaa Hadid, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - A new Israeli law bans showing overly thin models in local advertising in an attempt to fight the spread of eating disorders. It also requires publications to disclose when they use altered images of models to make the women and men appear even thinner than they are. The law, passed late Monday, appears to be the first attempt by a government to use legislation to take on a fashion industry accused of abetting eating disorders...
NEWS
October 31, 2011
Why do Americans die younger, on average, than people in most other industrialized nations? One reason, say University of Pennsylvania researchers, is that we're fatter. Much fatter. And fatter younger . Average life expectancy at age 50 in the United States was reduced in 2006 by 1.54 years for women and 1.85 years for men by unhealthy weight, they calculated. And while just about all developed countries have a fat problem, ours is so much more severe that solving it would wipe out between one-fifth and more than half of the relative shortfall in U.S. longevity.
NEWS
September 14, 2011
Warren will run for Senate in Mass. WASHINGTON - Consumer advocate Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat, will enter the Massachusetts Senate primary for a shot at challenging incumbent Republican Scott Brown for his seat. Warren, 62, will formally declare Wednesday that she's running, spokesman Kyle Sullivan said. She plans to greet morning commuters in Boston and make other stops across the state. She said in a statement Tuesday: "The pressures on middle-class families are worse than ever, but it is the big corporations that get their way in Washington.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2011 | By Mary Clare Jalonick, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Rural Mississippi is the country's fattest state for the seventh year in a row, according to an annual obesity report issued Thursday. Colorado, a playground for hikers and outdoor enthusiasts, is the nation's thinnest. The report by two public-health groups has again delivered bad news: The nation is getting bigger every year. And looking at state-by-state statistics over the last 15 years, the groups found exponential waistline growth - Colorado, with 19.8 percent of adults considered obese according to 2010 data, would have been the nation's fattest state in 1995.
NEWS
August 6, 2010
Re: "More than the sum of our BMIs," Monday: Patrick Basham and John Luik would like us to believe that scientists and public-health experts are making up facts about the link between obesity and early death. Unfortunately, it's the two authors who are making up the facts. Obesity, poor nutrition, and physical inactivity are leading causes of death in the United States. Countless studies confirm a dangerous link between obesity, chronic disease, and reduced life expectancy. A 2009 study of 900,000 adults, published in the Lancet, demonstrated that obese adults, with a body mass index of 30 to 35, lived on average two to four less years than adults with a normal BMI of 22.5 to 25. Morbidly obese adults, with a BMI of 40 to 45, lived on average eight to 10 years less.
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