CollectionsBoard Games
IN THE NEWS

Board Games

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1988 | By Glenn Guzzo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rob Neuber was counting the blessings of his computer baseball game - the speed, the statistical accuracy and, most of all, the convenience of so few moving parts - when he stopped in midsentence. "My Sporting News just got ripped in half," he said, his tone so calm that he must never find fault with his 1-year-old, Felicia. Before the children, Neuber was inseparable from his sports board games. But after noticing that dice, cards and charts were steadily disappearing from table tops during the last few years, he neatly made the switch to electronic baseball.
NEWS
December 3, 1987 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maybe you don't play much Trivial Pursuit these days. It was the hot adult board game four years ago and was so hard to find in stores that, for a while, it was a status symbol for a host to pull it out at a party. But by now, your friends probably know what the largest city above the Arctic Circle is and how many No. 1 records Elvis had. But it was fun to have a half-dozen people shouting and laughing together, wasn't it? And it still is - so much so that sales of board games and table games are up 24 percent this year over last year, according to the Toy Manufacturers' Association in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1989 | By Jeff Seiken, Special to The Inquirer
Playing Monopoly is one of those pastimes that cut across generations. Regardless of age, just about everyone shares memories of moving those odd tokens - the iron, the thimble, the boot - around the board, snatching up properties and trying to drive opponents into bankruptcy. Since Parker Bros. introduced the first edition in 1935, Monopoly has remained remarkably popular, just as it has remained virtually unchanged. Perhaps inevitably, however, the times have caught up with it. The game born of the New Deal has now entered the new age - computer Monopoly is here.
NEWS
June 17, 2008 | By Kari Andren INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
By day, Erik Arneson is a top legislative staffer, mulling over politics and policy. By night, he is an expert gamer for the online information source About.com, battling Imperial stormtroopers. He spends evenings, weekends and even vacations playing games and writing reviews and articles for the Web site. Not just any games, but the kind played on boards with dice. Arneson, 37, acknowledges that his dual roles sometimes earn him a "nerd" label. As chief policy director for Senate Republicans, Arneson works behind the scenes crafting legislation.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1991 | By Marc Schogol, Inquirer Staff Writer The Knight-Ridder News Service contributed to this article
Two years ago, serious bridge players thought their beloved game was an endangered species. Caught up in the video-game, VCR, big-screen-TV, compact-disc boom, young adults, whose parents had played bridge, were not dealing themselves in. As a result, the average age of members of the American Contract Bridge League had crept up to 57, and one veteran bridge master, a man recovering from major heart surgery, solemnly proclaimed: "Bridge is...
LIVING
August 11, 1998 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rutgers University professor H. Bruce Franklin had already finished the bulk of his research. He had written the text for his book on the myths about missing American soldiers in Vietnam. He had even sent the galley proofs back to his printer. But, just to make sure he hadn't overlooked anything, Franklin decided to spend half a day rummaging through a special collection at La Salle University's campus library. Soon after Franklin arrived, he realized he'd overlooked a lot. La Salle's unusual collection brings together 10,000 items - books, scripts, recordings, trinkets, even board games - that illustrate how myths and facts about the Vietnam War evolved into integral parts of America's culture and psyche.
NEWS
February 3, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - In a noisy warehouse a mile from the Capitol, workers push sheets of steel through giant machines that turn the slices of metal into polished wheelbarrows. A new one rolls off the assembly line every six seconds. The Ames True Temper plant proudly calls itself the wheelbarrow capital of the world, a distinction claimed since 1876, when the original company, Jackson Manufacturing, began industrialized production of the implements. So workers there were dismayed to learn last month that the maker of Monopoly planned to retire one of the game's familiar tokens and Las Vegas oddsmakers predicted the silvery little wheelbarrow would lose the popularity contest.
SPORTS
February 2, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
We men, it seems, outgrow clothes, crushes, and candy, but rarely our toys. Recently, a 56-year-old in-law built a new home. Its most striking feature is the climate-controlled trophy room he added to showcase his Matchbox cars. Decades ago, a sports editor here, an otherwise sensible middle-aged man, used to gather weekly in the newsroom with like-minded journalists for spirited Strat-O-Matic battles. And I have Medicare-eligible friends who cherish and collect pinball machines, board games, baseball gloves.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1990 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bored? This year, the answer may be boards. Board games. As in Monopoly and checkers. But we're talking about board games with a '90s (or, more often, an '80s) twist. "This is a very good year for board games," said Frank Reysen, editor of Playthings, the top magazine on the toy industry. "One theory is that, with the uncertainty about the economy, people are looking for less expensive means of social interaction. " Reysen's magazine annually surveys buyers for about 10,000 American toy stores to find out what toys and games are selling best.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1991 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Despite obvious competition from high-tech games like Nintendo, old- fashioned board games like Monopoly, Scrabble and Trivial Pursuit continue to sell well. Which is why, at this time of year, there are both new editions of those games - and new games seeking the same kind of success. Some 70 percent of all games are purchased between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Among new choices this year are: A version of Trivial Pursuit that asks questions about TV for couch potatoes who don't know about anything else.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
February 2, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
We men, it seems, outgrow clothes, crushes, and candy, but rarely our toys. Recently, a 56-year-old in-law built a new home. Its most striking feature is the climate-controlled trophy room he added to showcase his Matchbox cars. Decades ago, a sports editor here, an otherwise sensible middle-aged man, used to gather weekly in the newsroom with like-minded journalists for spirited Strat-O-Matic battles. And I have Medicare-eligible friends who cherish and collect pinball machines, board games, baseball gloves.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Damian D. "Skipper" Pitts was not offended when a student in his leadership class at Temple University raised a hand one Thursday night last year and asked for an early dismissal. Pitts was just confused by the excuse: The student wanted to get home in time to watch Scandal . "I said, 'What the hell is Scandal ?' " Pitts recalled recently. "The only thing the classroom didn't do was stone me. " A year later, the former Marine and leadership consultant from Fort Washington cannot only rattle off the names of every character like a true Gladiator, as fans of the ABC-TV political drama are known, he aims to cash in on the program's wild appeal with a crisis-leadership game called Scandalytes.
SPORTS
March 16, 2013 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - Just six days ago, Temple seemed nearly invincible. Coming off a nationally televised blowout of No. 25 Virginia Commonwealth, which was their seventh straight win, the Owls appeared unstoppable in their quest for an Atlantic Ten tournament title. It didn't happen. Temple's seemingly well-oiled machine was wrecked by Massachusetts for the second consecutive season in the A-10 tourney quarterfinals. This time, the Minutemen prevailed, 79-74, on Friday night at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn.
NEWS
February 3, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - In a noisy warehouse a mile from the Capitol, workers push sheets of steel through giant machines that turn the slices of metal into polished wheelbarrows. A new one rolls off the assembly line every six seconds. The Ames True Temper plant proudly calls itself the wheelbarrow capital of the world, a distinction claimed since 1876, when the original company, Jackson Manufacturing, began industrialized production of the implements. So workers there were dismayed to learn last month that the maker of Monopoly planned to retire one of the game's familiar tokens and Las Vegas oddsmakers predicted the silvery little wheelbarrow would lose the popularity contest.
NEWS
December 27, 2012
Evelyn B. Raymond Thomas, 73, of Wynnefield, a retired teacher, died of cancer Tuesday, Dec. 18, at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospice in Darby Borough. Mrs. Thomas was a teacher in public schools in Philadelphia for 33 years, including many years at Kenderton Elementary School and Ada H. Lewis Middle School. She retired in 2000. Mrs. Thomas was born in West Grove and raised in West Philadelphia. She graduated from West Philadelphia Catholic Girls' High School in 1957 and earned a bachelor's degree in education from Cheyney University in 1962.
NEWS
December 24, 2012 | By Pat Eaton-Robb, Associated Press
NEWTOWN, Conn. - Newtown children were showered with gifts Saturday - tens of thousands of teddy bears, Barbie dolls, soccer balls, and board games - just a portion of the tokens of support from around the world for a town in mourning. Just a little over a week ago, 20 children and six school employees were gunned down at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Twenty-year-old Adam Lanza killed his mother, attacked the school, then killed himself. Police don't know what set off the massacre.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
WANT TO GET into the movie business? Create a board game popular with baby boomers. Preferably a half-century ago. Following in the footsteps of "Clue" the upcoming "Battleship" and other toys turned cinematic properties like Pokemon, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Transformers, Adam Sandler is set to star in "Candy Land. " Why didn't Tattle ever write that "Chutes and Ladders" script? TheWrap.com reports Sandler is in final talks with Sony and Hasbro to star and produce.
NEWS
February 5, 2011
Joan E. Ferry, 76, formerly of Drexel Hill, a retired nurse, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Tuesday, Feb. 1, at Manor Care in Pottstown. Ms. Ferry graduated from West Philadelphia High School for Girls and the St. Agnes Hospital School of Nursing in South Philadelphia. She served on the nursing staffs at St. Agnes Hospital, Hahnemann University Hospital, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, and Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital in Darby. In the 1970s, she supervised the dialysis unit at Jefferson, said a son, William J. Rafferty Jr. "She was a very intelligent woman and should have been a physician like her father," he said.
LIVING
August 12, 2009 | By Sean Wood FOR THE INQUIRER
The Chinese Emperor Yao was disturbed by his young son's inability to concentrate. So, legend has it, the ancient ruler asked an adviser to invent an activity that would condition the boy's mind. The result: a wooden board and two boxes of stones. Thus was born "go," one of the oldest and most complex board games on the planet. Part sport, part mystical experience, the 4,000-year-old tradition has attracted followers who are a rare combination of strategists and seers. An increasing number of Western devotees include celebrities Robin Williams, Paul Giamatti, and Rod Stewart.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|