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Boat Trip

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NEWS
June 14, 1989 | By Jonathan Sidener, Special to The Inquirer
A riverboat tour of the Delaware River waterfront in Pennsauken will take place Saturday as part of the preparation for the township's 1992 centennial celebration. Participants will get a look at the township's past and future from the decks of the Liberty Bell, a Philadelphia-based tour boat. "We'll have a speaker on the river and the . . . history of Pennsauken, the Indians and the settlers, and how Pennsauken started as a river community," said Bernie Kofoet, chairman of Up With Pennsauken, which is coordinating the event.
NEWS
May 10, 1992 | By David C. Layton, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Several porpoises swam playfully alongside the boat and hundreds of smaller fish were leaping from the water as we pulled into the dock here for the first stop of a 1,000-mile journey down the Amazon. From the deck, the passengers - mostly Brazilians on their way downriver to the city of Manaus - watched this little drama with much amusement. One small boy on deck even tried to catch a fish that flew in his direction, but it flopped back into the yellowish water with its companions.
NEWS
April 19, 1998 | By Sharon Hernes Silverman, FOR THE INQUIRER
He was born in a cabin beneath bald cypress trees. He once caught a 45-pound catfish. He calls his dog "Gator Bait. " Meet Ronald "Black" Guidry, host of "A Cajun Man's Swamp Cruise" in Houma, La. The two- to three-hour, $15 boat trip offers close-up views of alligators, insight into the swamp ecosystem, and a look at life in the heart of Louisiana's bayou country. But the chief attraction is Guidry himself, a talented entertainer who delights tourists with his good nature, bad jokes, and genuine Cajun music.
NEWS
May 18, 1991 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
A musical about a boat trip by three Englishmen up the River Thames doesn't sound like the subject for much of a musical, and Three Men in a Boat isn't much of a musical. It is so slight, basically uninteresting and silly that one wonders why it was written and why anyone would want to put it on the stage. From the outset of the production by the Play Works Company at the Climax Theater, you get a pretty good idea of how unexciting Three Men in a Boat, based on an 1889 novel by Jerome K. Jerome, is going to be. The first crisis occurs when one of the men finds that he has forgotten his toothbrush and wants to return home to fetch it. Other incidents and songs are built around such significant events as a tangled towline, peeling potatoes for a stew, one of the men's partaking of forbidden cheese, and an incidental off-the-Thames story about an incompetent man who spends all day trying to drive a nail into a wall to hang a picture.
NEWS
May 12, 1993 | by Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
Charles Bagley put his murder acquittal on public view yesterday, speaking out for the first time since he was accused of wife-killing four years ago. He says he had an idyllic marriage, never slept with other women, never smacked his wife. And of course, never killed Yvonne Bagley in their Main Line hot tub and won't get a penny of the life insurance money. The system worked, he told Wally Kennedy on "AM/Philadelphia," on WPVI-TV (Channel 6), yesterday morning. With Neil Jokelson, the lawyer who helped detach him from Delaware County's legal maw, Bagley answered questions haltingly, showing only glimpses of the wide grin that often creased his face during his 16 days on trial in Media.
NEWS
September 26, 1997 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU Staff writers Robert Moran and Russell E. Eshleman Jr. contributed to this article
A York County senator paid for sex with a 19-year-old prostitute, billed the state for their drinks at a local bar, and lied on his expense voucher to cover it up, the state attorney general charged yesterday. Authorities charged Republican Daniel S. Delp, 32 - a first-term conservative who co-sponsored a bill toughening prostitution penalties - with patronizing a prostitute, furnishing alcohol to a minor, and theft by deception. Delp, who is divorced, faces a maximum of four years in prison and $10,000 in fines if convicted.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2011 | By Robert Strauss, For The Inquirer
Mother's Day of late has devolved into a series of Sunday brunches and big bouquets and tithing to Hallmark for the biggest and most monumental card available. Doesn't Mom deserve more than the cliché, though? Anna Jarvis, the Philadelphia woman who was the spirit behind the modern Mother's Day holiday, wanted the occasion to be more than that - with real celebrations and appropriate personal huzzahs - for Mom. Behold, a few things somewhat off-the-Mommy-track for this year:   Boat trip to Bartram's John Bartram was America's first celebrity botanist.
NEWS
January 21, 1996 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
January's brutal weather in the Northeast bodes well for tourism in Florida, industry representatives said - never mind that Florida was having its own weather problems at the time. Hotels and cruise lines reported a surge of bookings even as Philadelphia, New York and other major cities were in the grips of blizzard-like weather early in the month. At Certified Vacations in Fort Lauderdale, reservations for travel from the Northeast to South Florida jumped 17 percent the weekend of the big storm, a company spokesman said.
NEWS
November 29, 1996 | By Erin Mooney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If Washington and his troops were crossing the frigid Delaware this Christmas, they would be in deep water. With just one boat to make the voyage, it would be a tough journey. But, with 120 reenactors instead of the original 2,400 Continental troops who made the crossing with cannons and horses, it will be a much easier voyage. For 43 years, the reenactment of Washington's historic 1776 boat trip has been made in several Durham boats, 40- to 60-footers used to transport goods such as iron ore and grain on open river waters.
NEWS
August 15, 2004 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Clayton L. Farraday, 90, of Wynnewood, head of the upper school at Friends' Central for 20 years, died of renal failure July 22 at Kendal-Crosslands, a Quaker retirement community in Kennett Square. Born in West Philadelphia, Mr. Farraday spent most of his childhood, and his entire adult life - save for six years - associated with Friends' Central as a student, teacher, director, and, after retiring in 1979, an archivist. Those six years away from the Quaker school on City Avenue were spent at Swarthmore College, where he earned a bachelor's degree in biology in 1936, and at Temple University, which awarded him a master's degree in education in 1939.
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TRAVEL
March 11, 2013 | By Patricia Sheridan, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
LUGANO, Switzerland - The trains run on time, but the people may not. That is Lugano. A cozy town in southern Switzerland, it defies all the stereotypes of this alpine country. The flags indicate you are in the land of fondue and no-nonsense bankers, but the language, the attitude, and the food all point to the Mediterranean neighbor to the south, Italy. You speak Italian and pay in Swiss francs. Deep, emerald-green Lake Lugano is the centerpiece of this Italian-flavored Swiss treasure in the Ticino region, but it's not always the focus of activity.
NEWS
July 5, 2011 | By Mariana Martinez, Associated Press
TIJUANA, Mexico - American tourists on an annual July Fourth fishing trip were plunged into the Gulf of California in the middle of the night, along with the crew of their boat, after a flash storm upended their vessel, killing one of the tourists and leaving seven missing. Nineteen of the 27 tourists, all men and most from the Bay Area in northern California, were found alive, as were all 16 Mexican crew members, said Mexican navy Capt. Benjamin Pineda Gomez in the Baja California port of San Felipe.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2011 | By Robert Strauss, For The Inquirer
Mother's Day of late has devolved into a series of Sunday brunches and big bouquets and tithing to Hallmark for the biggest and most monumental card available. Doesn't Mom deserve more than the cliché, though? Anna Jarvis, the Philadelphia woman who was the spirit behind the modern Mother's Day holiday, wanted the occasion to be more than that - with real celebrations and appropriate personal huzzahs - for Mom. Behold, a few things somewhat off-the-Mommy-track for this year:   Boat trip to Bartram's John Bartram was America's first celebrity botanist.
NEWS
January 13, 2005 | By Ken Moritsugu INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
As the wall of water rushed in, Yusnadi, a 38-year-old elementary schoolteacher, grabbed his three children, put them on his motorcycle, and sped off. It was too late. A torrent carrying countless uprooted trees slammed into them from behind, then swept Yusnadi along for nearly two miles. He never saw his children again, or his wife, who was fleeing on foot. All along the Indonesian coast, men like Yusnadi tell similar tales, harrowing accounts of their own survival that end with the discovery that their wives and children perished.
NEWS
August 15, 2004 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Clayton L. Farraday, 90, of Wynnewood, head of the upper school at Friends' Central for 20 years, died of renal failure July 22 at Kendal-Crosslands, a Quaker retirement community in Kennett Square. Born in West Philadelphia, Mr. Farraday spent most of his childhood, and his entire adult life - save for six years - associated with Friends' Central as a student, teacher, director, and, after retiring in 1979, an archivist. Those six years away from the Quaker school on City Avenue were spent at Swarthmore College, where he earned a bachelor's degree in biology in 1936, and at Temple University, which awarded him a master's degree in education in 1939.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1998 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
They're called Krapp (no first name), and Jerry (no last name). One is old, one young. One is vaguely English, the other obviously American. But these characters in plays by Samuel Beckett and Edward Albee share a trait: Both are solitary, cut off from other humans and the consolations of companionship and love. How these two disparate yet similar individuals cope with their aloneness is the substance of Beckett's Krapp's Last Tape and Albee's The Zoo Story. The plays, on a twin bill being presented by Venture Theatre at The Adrienne, provide not only a fascinating look at two alienated men but a compelling program of theater.
NEWS
November 13, 1998 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shortly before leaving for Stone Harbor, N.J., to dump Anne Marie Fahey's body in the ocean, Thomas J. Capano called a friend to cancel a golfing date they had tentatively set for later that afternoon, a Superior Court jury was told yesterday. "He sounded disappointed that he couldn't play," lawyer David McBride said of the voice-mail message that was waiting for him when he arrived at his office around 7:45 a.m. on Friday, June 28, 1996. Prosecutors contend that phone call was made just hours after Capano killed Fahey, and at a time when he was frantically putting in place his plan to dispose of her remains in the Atlantic Ocean.
NEWS
April 19, 1998 | By Sharon Hernes Silverman, FOR THE INQUIRER
He was born in a cabin beneath bald cypress trees. He once caught a 45-pound catfish. He calls his dog "Gator Bait. " Meet Ronald "Black" Guidry, host of "A Cajun Man's Swamp Cruise" in Houma, La. The two- to three-hour, $15 boat trip offers close-up views of alligators, insight into the swamp ecosystem, and a look at life in the heart of Louisiana's bayou country. But the chief attraction is Guidry himself, a talented entertainer who delights tourists with his good nature, bad jokes, and genuine Cajun music.
NEWS
December 7, 1997 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
The terrorist killings of 58 tourists at Luxor on Nov. 17 and State Department warnings that U.S. citizens should avoid travel to that part of Egypt at least through Feb. 17 have prompted many tour operators to cancel package tours to Egypt. The cancellations arise not only because many tourists want to heed the warning, but also because companies fear liability if clients run into problems. Big companies such as Tauck Tours, which had a new Egypt-Israel cruise tour in the works, and General Tours have canceled their trips for the near future, according to Travel Weekly.
NEWS
September 26, 1997 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU Staff writers Robert Moran and Russell E. Eshleman Jr. contributed to this article
A York County senator paid for sex with a 19-year-old prostitute, billed the state for their drinks at a local bar, and lied on his expense voucher to cover it up, the state attorney general charged yesterday. Authorities charged Republican Daniel S. Delp, 32 - a first-term conservative who co-sponsored a bill toughening prostitution penalties - with patronizing a prostitute, furnishing alcohol to a minor, and theft by deception. Delp, who is divorced, faces a maximum of four years in prison and $10,000 in fines if convicted.
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