CollectionsBoathouse
IN THE NEWS

Boathouse

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | By Anne Fahy, Special to The Inquirer
Showing more than a little sportsmanship, officials in Upper Merion Township said they might give the school district the title to a boathouse in the township. If the township and the school board come to an agreement, Upper Merion would be one of the only school districts in the area to own its own boathouse. The district has been leasing the boathouse from the township for its crew team. It also sublets the boathouse to other rowing clubs. The offer, which came as a surprise to school board members, was made at the annual joint meeting of the township Board of Supervisors and the school board Thursday night.
NEWS
December 4, 2003 | By Judy Lazo
I am outraged at the $4.6 million being allocated for a boathouse and rowing center on the north bank of the Cooper River in Pennsauken, across from my neighborhood. I don't understand why our tax dollars ($1 million from Camden County), plus the money we spend for tolls on the bridges (a $1 million grant from the Delaware River Port Authority and a $1 million authority loan) and $1.6 million from the state Green Acres program, are being used to build a boathouse. How can the freeholders use our tax dollars primarily for children of the wealthy?
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | By Duane Winner, Special to The Inquirer
Neglected for years, the ornate boathouse of the Glen Foerd estate was about to be restored to its original condition. Then, the night before the work was to begin, the boathouse went up in flames. That was on June 1, and the fire that left only the stone foundation turned an $80,000 restoration into a $125,000 rebuilding. The fire was ruled arson by city officials. No suspects or motives have been discovered. Bill Haas, director of the Glen Foerd estate, said that about $70,000 had been raised so far to build a replica of the original boathouse.
NEWS
September 22, 1986 | By Phyllis Holtzman, Special to The Inquirer
The members of the Upper Merion school board have had their first look at the blueprints for the renovation of the old boathouse property along the Schuylkill in the township. At an informal work session Wednesday, Phillip Mowry, director of operational services for the school district, presented the plans to the board. "You are looking at the actual working blueprints," he told board members. The boathouse, which is a one-story shell, has been headquarters for the Upper Merion High School crew team for more than seven years.
NEWS
January 16, 2013
By Nancy Goldenberg A new process for reviewing the use of park and recreational land in Philadelphia is about to be tested. Thanks to a change in city law, members of the public will play a leading role tonight when the Parks and Recreation Commission reviews a proposal by Temple University to build a new boathouse on Kelly Drive. As The Inquirer reported last month, Temple officials hope to build a 23,000-square-foot boathouse on a parcel of parkland in the shadow of the Strawberry Mansion Bridge, on the eastern bank of the Schuylkill.
NEWS
November 29, 1987 | Special to The Inquirer / BEVERLY SCHAEFER
The Upper Merion Area School District dedicated its boathouse on the Schuylkill on Nov. 21. The boathouse, renovated by students in the Central Montgomery County Area Vocational-Technical School, is the home of the Upper Merion Area High School crew team. The school district leases space to the Lower Merion School District and will be leasing space to others. The boathouse, originally owned by Jack Trinsey, had fallen into disrepair and Upper Merion Township condemned it. The district agreed to renovate it and holds a 99-year lease from the township.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University has withdrawn its proposal to build a new boathouse along the Schuylkill after concerns were raised that the university was not providing replacement parkland as required by a city ordinance. Kenneth Lawrence Jr., a senior vice president at Temple, wrote in a letter Tuesday to Nancy Goldenberg, chair of the Parks and Recreation Commission, that the university was "not in a position to make a commitment" without further study of its options. At a January hearing, Temple was criticized for proposing to give the city $1.5 million to repair the East Park Canoe House, the university's former rowing home, instead of offering substitute green space for the now-withdrawn boathouse site near the Strawberry Mansion Bridge.
NEWS
June 8, 1995 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Art Commission gave its blessing yesterday to a new boathouse on the Schuylkill, climaxing a six-year effort by St. Joseph's University and St. Joseph's Preparatory School to gain approval for the facility. Construction of the $600,000 building, which will be located south of the East Park canoe house, should begin later this year, and the building could be open for use by next summer. The Fairmount Park Commission approved the design last week, leaving the art commission as the last regulatory hurdle.
NEWS
December 21, 1986 | By Kathy Boccella, Special to The Inquirer
The Upper Merion school board awarded new contracts this week for the installation of an elevator at the high school and the restoration of the school district's boathouse. The elevator project was awarded to Walter Brucker of New Britain for $106,962. Plans call for the elevator to be installed between the first and second floors of the high school, with work scheduled to begin this year. Building materials for the boathouse will be purchased from March and Kneas Lumber of Norristown.
NEWS
June 13, 1990 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
The wooden boathouse had clung to the riverbank since 1850, weathering the seasons atop a stone foundation that reached down into the slow, lapping water of the Delaware. At the turn of the century, the structure provided its owners and visitors a fancy coming-ashore at the 18-acre estate of Robert H. Foerderer, a U.S. congressman who owned a leather tanning plant just downriver. After a venture to Center City or points beyond, Foerderer and crew would anchor their yacht out in deeper water, then board a smaller craft that delivered them to a slip under the boathouse.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 28, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, Malvern Prep operated its rowing program out of two used truck trailers parked next to a landfill, all the while dreaming of some day having its own boathouse. "I remember thinking at the time that it would be a great spot to film an urban horror movie," recalled William P. "Tip" O'Neill Jr., emeritus trustee at the all-male school. As a step up, the team moved to a warehouse. Better, but no running water and 150 yards from the river - not a short walk when carrying boats.
SPORTS
December 16, 2013 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the shock bit into her, Temple's women's rowing coach didn't remember saying much of anything. "I couldn't even think of a question," Rebecca Smith Grzybowski said. "I was completely blindsided. " Seven Temple sports had just been cut, she was told by athletic director Kevin G. Clark, including her sport. By the time of that conversation, midday on Dec. 6, Temple's board of trustees had already voted unanimously to cut baseball, softball, men's gymnastics, men's indoor track and spring track and field, and men's and women's rowing, effective at the end of the spring season.
SPORTS
December 8, 2013 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
Barely more than an hour after he got the news, Gavin White sat in his car in the driveway next to the Liacouras Center, blinkers flashing, rain filling his windshield. He looked at his ringing phone. "This is my wife," said Temple's men's rowing coach, in his 34th year on the job. "Hey, Whitey," White said, getting right to why he had left her a message to call. "They cut crew. . . . Yes, they did. They cut seven sports. They cut men and women's crew. I think the whole boathouse thing, we cut our own throats with that.
SPORTS
July 29, 2013 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
So why were the club flags on Boathouse Row recently at half staff? For a relatively young man (36 years old) who had lived in Philadelphia for just over two years? Who didn't formally belong to any of those boathouses? Who wasn't even American? Did those spiritual descendants of Jack Kelly along the drive named for him believe they recognized a kindred spirit, or hoped so? Did they see a throwback to a time before performance enhancers and luxury suites and Andrew Bynum?
NEWS
May 6, 2013
TEMPLE University last week said that it will stop pursuing plans to build a new 23,000-square-foot boathouse on the east bank of the Schuylkill. The university ran into problems because those plans came in direct conflict with a city ordinance to protect open space. That law prohibits acquiring public land without offering a replacement parcel of parkland in return, which Temple didn't do. Of course, in a city with tens of thousands of parcels of vacant land, some might find it ironic to have a law designed to protect open space.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University has withdrawn its proposal to build a new boathouse along the Schuylkill after concerns were raised that the university was not providing replacement parkland as required by a city ordinance. Kenneth Lawrence Jr., a senior vice president at Temple, wrote in a letter Tuesday to Nancy Goldenberg, chair of the Parks and Recreation Commission, that the university was "not in a position to make a commitment" without further study of its options. At a January hearing, Temple was criticized for proposing to give the city $1.5 million to repair the East Park Canoe House, the university's former rowing home, instead of offering substitute green space for the now-withdrawn boathouse site near the Strawberry Mansion Bridge.
NEWS
March 21, 2013
Thanks to the city Commission on Parks and Recreation, Temple University may finally be on the right course to find a Schuylkill River boathouse for its crew team. The commission has asked the university to investigate renovating the East Park Canoe House, which first opened in 1914, and Temple has agreed to consider that possibility, but no promises have been made. Initially, Temple wanted to cram a new 23,000-square-foot boathouse between the crumbling Canoe House and the Strawberry Mansion Bridge, choking a thin strip of land between the river and Kelly Drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The lush, sinuous banks of the Schuylkill between Boathouse Row and the Falls Bridge are one of Philadelphia's glory spots, the landscape equivalent of a great architectural ensemble. It's a treasure that deserves kid-glove care, and yet over the last two decades, the precious parkland has been a victim of almost serial abuse. Historic boathouses have been left to crumble. Second-rate newcomers have been plopped onto the scenic riverfront as casually as fast-food joints on a highway strip.
NEWS
January 17, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
SHOULD TEMPLE University be allowed to build a boathouse on the Schuylkill without providing substitute land under the city's Open Lands Protection law? The city Parks and Recreation Commission wants to hear from residents about the issue at 6 p.m. Wednesday at Lloyd Hall, 1 Boathouse Row, off Kelly Drive. Temple plans a 23,000-square-foot boathouse on Fairmount Park land under the Strawberry Mansion Bridge. Temple's rowing crew had used the East Park Canoe House until 2008, when it was condemned as unsafe.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|