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Bob Cratchit

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NEWS
November 7, 1993 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Britain will issue five commemoratives Tuesday recalling the 150th anniversary of the publication of A Christmas Carol, perhaps the most enduring children's holiday story. The stamps include the characters in Charles Dickens' classic: Tiny Tim, Bob Cratchit, Mr. and Mrs. Fezziwig, Ebenezer Scrooge's nephew and, of course, Scrooge himself. Dickens was 31 when he completed A Christmas Carol in early December of 1843 after just six weeks of writing. He already was the acclaimed author of such works as Oliver Twist, and in its first week, A Christmas Carol, decorated in red binding and gilt design, sold 6,000 copies.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Who is better to serve as our guide and narrator of the magical transformation of the miserly Scrooge than Gonzo in The Muppet Christmas Carol? And you would have to go back to Alastair Sim and the definitive 1951 A Christmas Carol to find a more richly satisfying Scrooge than Michael Caine. Apart from negotiating Scrooge's transformation from world-class Yulephobe to Mr. Geniality with masterly aplomb, Caine manages to keep a straight face in scenes where Kermit the Frog is playing Bob Cratchit and begging him for an extra shovel of coal.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
Bah, humbug! The sentiments of Ebenezer Scrooge notwithstanding, Danceteller's adaptation of Charles Dickens' Christmas classic, A Christmas Carol, is a generally joyful affair that gets to the heart of the story with speed and verve. This production, which was presented last night at the Painted Bride Art Center and continues through tomorrow night, is a mixed-media piece combining Dickens' words with dance and pantomime. The script is by David B. Collins, and the choreography by Trina Collins, artistic director of Danceteller.
NEWS
November 21, 2006 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
This time of year, productions of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol stud the landscape like hunks of candied orange peel on a fruitcake. Much like the ubiquitous holiday dessert, those productions often end up sodden relics of a tradition that began with the best of intentions but became dreaded byproducts of seasonal tyranny. In Bristol Riverside Theatre's production of The Trial of Ebenezer Scrooge, Scrooge has reverted to his holiday-hating self, and the three ghosts, plus Scrooge's former business partner, Jacob Marley, are now on trial for kidnapping, breaking and entering, and other offenses related to that fateful night exactly one year earlier, when Scrooge discovered his Christmas spirit.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1992 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
Good old Dickens, and good old Danceteller, which re-creates his A Christmas Carol so faithfully year after year. Beginning its ninth season Thursday at the Painted Bride Art Center, where it runs through Wednesday, Danceteller's rendition is as fresh as ever. Conceived and choreographed by Trina Collins, this Carol is a model of how dance and the spoken word can coexist happily on the same stage. So artful is the combination of movement and speech, the viewer is often unaware of where one leaves off and the other begins.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1994 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
If you know John Astin from his role as Gomez in The Addams Family television show, you won't recognize him on the stage of the Merriam Theater, where he is starring in A Christmas Carol. The makeup Astin wears to play the elderly Ebenezer Scrooge pretty much obscures the actor's familiar features. And judging from his performance, that's just the way Astin wants it. He obviously wants the audience to see the character rather than the actor playing him. He creates a very credible Scrooge and shows in the process that, though he may be best-known from appearing on television, he is also a stage actor with presence and authority.
NEWS
November 5, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
There are four ghosts in Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol," but most movie versions have downplayed the story's pee-your-pants potential. That changes with "Disney's A Christmas Carol," a Robert Zemeckis animated movie that uses the latest 3-D and computer-graphic artistry to bring up the scare quotient in Dickens' classic story. If you're Marley's ghost, you haven't rattled chains until you've thrust them forth from a 3-D screen, held them in front of some kid's face and shaken them in 60-channel IMAX sound.
NEWS
December 23, 1988 | BY MIKE ROYKO
He was sitting on the next barstool, and in the spirit of the season I nodded pleasantly and said hello. We exchanged names. At first I wasn't sure I heard him correctly. Bob what? I asked. "Cratchit. Bob Cratchit. " Unusual. Same name as Scrooge's clerk in "A Christmas Carol. " "That's right," he said. I'll bet you take some ribbing on that, especially this time of year. "Always," he said, nodding glumly. Your parents must have been fans of that story.
NEWS
December 4, 2007 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Charles Dickens' public readings of his long story "A Christmas Carol" were wildly popular; he could, apparently, hold thousands of people spellbound: no props, no costumes; nothing but his voice to bring all the characters to life. Mum Puppettheatre's production - a reprise of last year's - has some wonderful puppet/props and certainly smaller audiences, but it's no less enthralling than the 19th-century show must have been. The familiar story - cleverly and economically adapted by playwright Bruce Graham - begins, as it always does, with old Ebenezer ("Bah, humbug")
NEWS
February 1, 1995 | BY JACK NOLAN
Five days before Christmas I found a Christmas card for my grandson - a large card with Santa Claus on it and an accordion-like pull-out which unmasked row after row of reindeer. It seemed just the thing for a 2 1/2-year- old. I signed the card. The envelope was bulky, so I weighed it on my postal scale. The card pushed the outer limit of an ounce, but didn't cross the line to two ounces. I put a 29-cent stamp on it, and mailed it at our local post office, which is in the same ZIP code as my grandson's home.
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NEWS
November 5, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
There are four ghosts in Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol," but most movie versions have downplayed the story's pee-your-pants potential. That changes with "Disney's A Christmas Carol," a Robert Zemeckis animated movie that uses the latest 3-D and computer-graphic artistry to bring up the scare quotient in Dickens' classic story. If you're Marley's ghost, you haven't rattled chains until you've thrust them forth from a 3-D screen, held them in front of some kid's face and shaken them in 60-channel IMAX sound.
NEWS
December 4, 2007 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Charles Dickens' public readings of his long story "A Christmas Carol" were wildly popular; he could, apparently, hold thousands of people spellbound: no props, no costumes; nothing but his voice to bring all the characters to life. Mum Puppettheatre's production - a reprise of last year's - has some wonderful puppet/props and certainly smaller audiences, but it's no less enthralling than the 19th-century show must have been. The familiar story - cleverly and economically adapted by playwright Bruce Graham - begins, as it always does, with old Ebenezer ("Bah, humbug")
NEWS
November 21, 2006 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
This time of year, productions of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol stud the landscape like hunks of candied orange peel on a fruitcake. Much like the ubiquitous holiday dessert, those productions often end up sodden relics of a tradition that began with the best of intentions but became dreaded byproducts of seasonal tyranny. In Bristol Riverside Theatre's production of The Trial of Ebenezer Scrooge, Scrooge has reverted to his holiday-hating self, and the three ghosts, plus Scrooge's former business partner, Jacob Marley, are now on trial for kidnapping, breaking and entering, and other offenses related to that fateful night exactly one year earlier, when Scrooge discovered his Christmas spirit.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2003 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In the decidedly non-Dickensian introductory scene of the adaptation of A Christmas Carol Mum Puppettheatre is presenting, one puppet character mentions to another that death has a part in the play to come. Eerie music then fills the theater, and two spectral figures suddenly appear. "That's a bit odd," one puppet says, and the remark could well describe the script by local playwright Bruce Graham and the puppet theater's presentation of the perennially popular Charles Dickens holiday story.
NEWS
December 17, 2001 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every year, Bill Beyer's frock coat - actually, a college roommate's old overcoat - pulls a bit tighter across his shoulders. Every year, Beyer declares that this surely will be the year the seams split. But there he was all the same not long ago, coat still intact, standing before his audience and telling of a long-ago fatality. "Marley was dead, to begin with," he said. "There was no doubt whatever about that. " So began his 26th year acting as the narrator, Charles Dickens.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Who is better to serve as our guide and narrator of the magical transformation of the miserly Scrooge than Gonzo in The Muppet Christmas Carol? And you would have to go back to Alastair Sim and the definitive 1951 A Christmas Carol to find a more richly satisfying Scrooge than Michael Caine. Apart from negotiating Scrooge's transformation from world-class Yulephobe to Mr. Geniality with masterly aplomb, Caine manages to keep a straight face in scenes where Kermit the Frog is playing Bob Cratchit and begging him for an extra shovel of coal.
NEWS
February 1, 1995 | BY JACK NOLAN
Five days before Christmas I found a Christmas card for my grandson - a large card with Santa Claus on it and an accordion-like pull-out which unmasked row after row of reindeer. It seemed just the thing for a 2 1/2-year- old. I signed the card. The envelope was bulky, so I weighed it on my postal scale. The card pushed the outer limit of an ounce, but didn't cross the line to two ounces. I put a 29-cent stamp on it, and mailed it at our local post office, which is in the same ZIP code as my grandson's home.
FOOD
December 21, 1994 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Home for the holidays? If you're in the restaurant business, chances are that "home" is the restaurant, because December is one of the busiest months at many places, says Joette M. Adams, executive director of the Philadelphia-Delaware Valley Restaurant Association. "We're packed," says Jane Marie Hill, a manager at the Dickens Inn on Head House Square, where the ghosts of Christmas past, present and future seem to be everywhere - hovering over the wooden tables, slipping playfully through the garland that is everywhere, perching on the brick mantels in the upstairs Pickwick Room.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1994 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
If you know John Astin from his role as Gomez in The Addams Family television show, you won't recognize him on the stage of the Merriam Theater, where he is starring in A Christmas Carol. The makeup Astin wears to play the elderly Ebenezer Scrooge pretty much obscures the actor's familiar features. And judging from his performance, that's just the way Astin wants it. He obviously wants the audience to see the character rather than the actor playing him. He creates a very credible Scrooge and shows in the process that, though he may be best-known from appearing on television, he is also a stage actor with presence and authority.
NEWS
December 15, 1994 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Using only the words of Charles Dickens, Pascual Vaquer has adapted the classic tale, A Christmas Carol, for the stage. His original production, presented by the Bucks County Center for the Performing Arts, will make its debut this weekend. "I have kept all the 19th-century language. Every line of dialogue was written by Dickens," said Vaquer, of Solebury, who also is directing the play. "It has a wonderful sound to it, and it's perfectly understandable to the modern ear. " The story of the miserly Scrooge, who is transformed after visits from a series of ghosts on Christmas Eve, will be performed tomorrow, Saturday and Sunday at the Phillips Mill Community Association Theatre, which is on River Road about two miles north of New Hope.
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