CollectionsBob Dylan
IN THE NEWS

Bob Dylan

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gird your lions!! Or your loins!! Or something! Bob Dylan will be powering into Camden. Here's Inquirer music maven Dan DeLuca 's blog: "Bob Dylan announced on his website on Sunday that he's hitting the road this summer with his own traveling Rolling Thunder-like revue called the Americanarama Festival of Music. Wilco and My Morning Jacket will join Dylan on the tour, which kicks off June 26 and comes to the Susquehanna Bank Center July 28. It'll be part of the WXPN-FM Xponential Music Festival, going on all that weekend at Wiggins Park and the Susq, where The Lumineers and Dr. Dog will play Saturday night.
LIVING
August 22, 1997 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
There had to be people who came to the Mann Center for the Performing Arts Wednesday night simply to see Bob Dylan walk onto the stage, to rejoice in his health, and to share in the triumph of a survivor. Earlier this summer, Dylan gave the music world a scare when he landed in the hospital with a rare heart infection. He resumed his "Neverending Tour" three weeks ago, and though he chatted more Wednesday than he has in the past - he introduced "Shelter From the Storm" as "the Neil Young version," and thanked the crowd for coming out in what he accurately described as a "drenching" rain - he played the survivor role with characteristic understatement.
NEWS
July 7, 1988 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular Music Critic
Bob Dylan in performance, 1988: One minute he's offering a not-quite-sugar- coated rendition of the early, observant gem "Just Like a Woman," carefully following the ebb and flow of the original melody. The next, he's hurling the phrases of "Like a Rolling Stone" bitterly, as though pitching a spiteful batting practice, disinterestedly discarding one strike after another. The dark side of Bob Dylan still rears its head on occasion, and this is a good thing. Last night at the Mann Music Center, Dylan treated the near- capacity crowd to a well-planned 75-minute show heavy on his songwriting gems - many of them recharged by his unexpectedly urgent jabs and an emphasis on living, breathing, sometimes kicking performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Retro-soul music's been in fashion for the last decade on both sides of the Atlantic. But while there is no shortage of Stax-style soul-shouters and postmodern Motown acolytes out and about, there has been a dearth of acoustic soul revivalists bringing back the earthy 1970s vibes of such natural-born soul men as Bill Withers, Terry Callier, and Van Morrison. That's where Michael Kiwanuka comes in. The 24-year-old jazz-schooled singer and guitarist of Ugandan parentage hails from the Muswell Hill section of North London, where the Davies brothers of the Kinks grew up. Kiwanuka possesses a rich, grainy voice that communicates extraordinary calm.
NEWS
June 8, 1988 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Staff Writer
"A set of songs and ideas worthy of The Dylan Legacy," reads a sticker attached to the front cover of Down in the Groove (Columbia), the new album by Bob Dylan. Another sticker trumpets that Dylan is a "1988 Rock-and-Roll Hall of Fame inductee. " What's the point of this hype? Perhaps Columbia Records imagined scads of consumers standing around in record stores scratching their chins and saying thoughtfully, "Well, I wasn't going to bother buying this one, but since he's a Rock-and-Roll Hall of Fame inductee . . . " This is a marketing strategy sure to go over big only in Cleveland, where the ill-fated hall remains on the drawing board, a passing thought in architect I. M. Pei's mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1997 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Bob Dylan has finally painted his dark-blue masterpiece. After decades wrestling with the blues, first in wordy academic exercises and more recently in spare interpretations of rural classics, the 56-year-old rock bard has poured his hard-won wisdom into an astonishing collection of blunt meditations on life and death. Time Out of Mind ( Columbia), which arrives in stores today, dwells on the human concerns that others in rock's senior division seem determined to escape: Aging.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1989 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
How does it feel, seeing Bob Dylan onstage 25 years after he made the transition from the coffeehouse circuit to stardom? Much better now than it did when he was keeping concert company with the Grateful Dead and Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. The durable troubadour wowed a sold-out Tower Theater last night with a tight, fresh-sounding 90-minute show. Much of the credit goes to his current partners - ponytailed "Saturday Night Live" guitarist G.E. Smith, bassist Torry Garnier and drummer Christopher Parker.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2004 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Moments before Bob Dylan walked onstage at different area venues on three successive nights this week, an anonymous announcer served up an overview of the bard's career. Through the sometimes deafening applause, you could pick up such phrases as "substance abuse" and "found God," and "who was written off as a has-been in the late '80s. " The idea, evidently, was to acquaint newcomers to the Church of Bob with his unprecedented reach, the myriad ways his music has informed and commented upon and threaded through American life during more than four trippy decades.
NEWS
November 7, 2011
TOM KLINE and his playwright son, Zac Kline, are hosting a seminar on Bob Dylan and the law on Friday, from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., at the Wilma Theater. The event includes a discussion on how Dylan's music relates to the justice system and will point out references to his lyrics in case law, including opinions written by U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Antonin Scalia. The program also will feature music by singer/songwriter Howard Fishman and his band and a guest appearance and signing by Seth Rogovoy, author of "Bob Dylan: Music-Mystic-Poet.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2003 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Masked and Anonymous isn't a good movie, at least by any conventional definition of the word good. But it's not a bad movie, either. It's a Bob Dylan movie. Which means that the pleasure (or pain) derived from watching it is in direct proportion to just how much of a fool for Bob Dylan you happen to be. And while it may be a slight exaggeration to say this is a Bob Dylan world, it's certainly a world full of Bob Dylan lovers, judging by the all-star cast assembled for the intentionally puzzling Larry Charles-directed saga (which looks great, despite a mere $4 million budget)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
  A 29-year veteran of the Delaware County District Attorney's Office - its financial administrator - was charged Friday with stealing more than $100,000 in drug-forfeiture money and spending it on concert and sports tickets and other items. Counts against Mary Elizabeth Lynch, 48, of Ridley Township, include receiving stolen property, forgery, and identity theft. Unsecured bail was set at $100,000, Delaware County District Attorney Jack Whelan announced. "This is a case of betrayal," Whelan said.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Bob Dylan does it his way. Recording standards from the American Songbook has become as predictable a career move for everyone from Rod Stewart to Paul McCartney to Lady Gaga (with Tony Bennett) as cutting a Christmas album. But Dylan - who also released the perverse holiday album Christmas In The Heart in 2009 - does not trod the well-worn path. All 10 songs on his new album, Shadows In The Night (Columbia ***) are associated with Frank Sinatra, but it is not a collection of ring-a-ding swing.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
When it comes to big-name albums, it's becoming rare for release dates to be announced much in advance. The element of surprise is a big bonus, and social media spread the word like wildfire. So, rather then tell us ahead of time, everybody's trying to keep a secret, then spring it on us for maximum promotional value, Beyoncé-style. So, along with the three to-be-announced releases by Kanye West, Kendrick Lamar, and Philadelphia rapper Meek Mill listed below, a whole lot of other marquee releases expected in early 2015 have no specified arrival dates.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2014 | Chuck Darrow, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
WHEN FRANK SINATRA JR. made his introductory remarks at Friday night's Parx Casino bash honoring local radio titan Sid Mark 's 58th year spinning Ol' Blue Eyes' records, he obviously noted the day was an important one, as it would have been his father's 99th birthday. But Dec. 12 was doubly significant: He revealed that it had been two years to the day since he was diagnosed with Stage 4A throat cancer (the "A" meant it had metastasized). Sinatra, 71 next month, spent about a year undergoing grueling radiation and chemotherapy, and eating through a tube inserted in his stomach.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
JAPANESE NATIONALISTS are in a tizzy over Angelina Jolie 's new movie, "Unbroken," the story of U.S. Olympian and World War II POW Louis Zamperini . According to Zamperini's story and the book about him by Laura Hillenbrand , Zamperini wasn't treated too well by Japanese guards while he was being held captive. But protesters claim that the depiction is unfair and untrue, and the London Telegraph says that those criticizing the film are trying to have it banned from Japan.
NEWS
November 24, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
A mysterious man in a white suit and boater hat walked onto the dimly lit stage of the Academy of Music just past 8 on Friday evening, whispering secrets into the microphone as a nimble, five-piece band played behind him. "All the truth in the world adds up to one big lie," he sang, confiding that he's been "trying to get as far away from myself as I possibly can. " For all his apparent existential discomfort, however - the opening number was...
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
CHRONICLING the recording of new music using long-lost lyrics by Bob Dylan, tonight's Showtime special "Lost Songs: The Basement Tapes Continued" will have its biggest appeal to the boomer-era fans taking in Mr. D's shows at the Academy of Music this weekend. But the target demo could be lowered by the far more "current" artists who took on this time-warping collaborative mission - Marcus Mumford (Mumford and Sons), Jim James (My Morning Jacket), Rhiannon Giddens (Carolina Chocolate Drops)
NEWS
November 17, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The question has lingered in song since it was first posed in the 1960s: How many roads must a man walk down - before he becomes the subject of a major university archive devoted to helping researchers discern the meaning of his every move and utterance? The answer, my friends, ain't blowin' in the wind. The answer is at La Salle University, which runs what it believes to be the nation's only academic collection focused on songwriter, poet, and troubadour Bob Dylan. Dylan will come to Philadelphia this week to perform three shows at the Academy of Music, his first Center City appearance since 1963.
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
TORONTO - The movie's over. The audience has laughed, cried, recoiled in horror at the bad behavior on display. But Bill Murray isn't finished. The titular star of St. Vincent - instantly a hallmark role of his career - creaks open the screen door to his character's pitiful backyard, headphones attached to a (yes!) portable cassette player, and starts singing along to Bob Dylan's "Shelter From the Storm. " For the next five minutes, as the credits roll for this feel-good comedy about a feel-bad guy, Murray fools around with a garden hose and echoes the Dylan verse on the sound track.
NEWS
September 30, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maybe the electrical problems that delayed Sunday's memorial service for Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Tony Auth were meant as metaphor. The power went out, but the light never dimmed. "In your life, Tony Auth, you welcomed the stranger, spoke up for the outcast, punctured the pretensions of the hypocrite," said longtime colleague Chris Satullo, quoting what he imagined God saying to Auth, a not particularly devout new arrival at heaven's gate. "You were devoted to those who loved you and you were disinclined to despise those who did not," Satullo said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|