CollectionsBob Dylan
IN THE NEWS

Bob Dylan

NEWS
July 16, 2012 | By Randy Lewis and Los Angeles Times
On July 25, 1965, Bob Dylan stepped onstage at the Newport Folk Festival, plugged in an electric guitar, and changed the course of pop music history. The performance caused a furious reaction. The crowd booed loudly, and folk icon Pete Seeger tried to stop the show. Dylan and his band retreated after three songs, coming back to play an acoustic set. Still, Dylan's provocative move has long been pointed to as a key moment when electric rock music eclipsed folk as the sound of the '60s generation.
NEWS
November 24, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
A mysterious man in a white suit and boater hat walked onto the dimly lit stage of the Academy of Music just past 8 on Friday evening, whispering secrets into the microphone as a nimble, five-piece band played behind him. "All the truth in the world adds up to one big lie," he sang, confiding that he's been "trying to get as far away from myself as I possibly can. " For all his apparent existential discomfort, however - the opening number was...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Ask any bartender: Aside from New Year's Eve, the Night before Turkey is the busiest party night of the year. And the post-turkey weekend gobbles like crazy, too. Folks returning to their hometown for family Thanksgiving visits are trolling for a little fun with their erstwhile homies. Marrieds-with-kids find sitters and hit the town. College kids do what college kids will do. And there are those who just want to get lubricated before and/or after Thursday's turkey-centric blowout - some all the way until they hit the road/train/plane on Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1994 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a sight to behold. Toward the end of Bob Dylan's concert at the Tower Theater on Thursday night, the famously misanthropic bard allowed his flock to approach the altar. With the venue's officious security force powerless to stop them, many in the reserved-seat crowd of rowdy graybeards, grungy teens and twentysomethings rushed to fill the aisles. After a storming "Maggie's Farm" that raged like a nor'easter (and included that rarest of Dylan moments: a brief, cryptic smile)
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
CHRONICLING the recording of new music using long-lost lyrics by Bob Dylan, tonight's Showtime special "Lost Songs: The Basement Tapes Continued" will have its biggest appeal to the boomer-era fans taking in Mr. D's shows at the Academy of Music this weekend. But the target demo could be lowered by the far more "current" artists who took on this time-warping collaborative mission - Marcus Mumford (Mumford and Sons), Jim James (My Morning Jacket), Rhiannon Giddens (Carolina Chocolate Drops)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2015 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kinky Friedman was home at his ranch in Medina, Texas, grappling with the logistics of his forthcoming tour while facing a deadline for a proposal for his next book. "I wish I didn't suffer the curse of being multitalented," says the irrepressible musician, mystery-novel writer, and former Texas gubernatorial candidate, who also runs an animal shelter. The tour itself seems to be a grueling affair for a 70-year-old - a month-plus of one-nighters with the few days off reserved for travel.
NEWS
November 7, 2011
"Chillin' Wit . . . " is a regular feature of the Daily News spotlighting a name in the news away from the job. TOM KLINE sits at his glossy dining-room table inside his Center City apartment and sips orange juice - that he just squeezed - out of a tall, flute-like glass. The table, set against a dizzying view of the city and adorned with a silver candelabra and glass vase filled with fresh white roses and pink tiger lilies, is heaped with books about Bob Dylan. This is Tom Kline unmiked.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2016 | By Nick Cristiano, Staff Writer
Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams weren't exactly burning to make an album of their own. The husband-and-wife duo were content being mainly accompanists. And they didn't lack for work, whether it was with Phil Lesh or Hot Tuna or Levon Helm. And that's not counting Campbell's eight years as a guitarist for Bob Dylan, or his work as a noted Americana producer. "People finally started shaming us into it," the Tennessee-bred Williams says with a laugh from the couple's Manhattan apartment.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Bob Dylan is a doomsayer, spreading the word that trouble is on the way. He's a crusty romantic "studying the art of love," still hopeful, at 65, that "it'll fit me like a glove. " And he's a devilishly cheery troubadour with a Snidely Whiplash mustache who playfully couples "I got the pork chop, she got the pie" with "She ain't no angel, and neither am I. " Modern Times (Columbia . ?), Dylan's 44th album and his first in five years, contains multitudes. No surprise there.
NEWS
November 20, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
For Todd Haynes, there was never going to be only one Bob Dylan. "There was a question of whether there should be six, or seven, or 20," says the director about I'm Not There, his perfectly titled movie about the most elusive of musical icons, in which Dylan is played by Cate Blanchett, Christian Bale, Heath Ledger, Ben Whishaw, and 11- year-old African American actor Marcus Carl Franklin. "But the idea of multiples as a way of getting to something true about him was almost plain as day," says the Far From Heaven director of the experimental biopic he conceived during a cross-country drive with a slew of Dylan tapes for company.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|