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Bob Dylan

NEWS
January 11, 2016
Tom Wilk is a former Inquirer copy editor who has a collection of Crawdaddy magazines in his basement Like many Swarthmore College students entering the school in September 1965, Paul Williams was a fan of the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and Bob Dylan. Unlike his contemporaries half a century ago, the 17-year-old freshman took his passion for the music one step further. From his dormitory room at Swarthmore, the Boston native began publishing Crawdaddy! magazine. Named after the club in London where the Stones performed, Crawdaddy!
NEWS
November 24, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
A mysterious man in a white suit and boater hat walked onto the dimly lit stage of the Academy of Music just past 8 on Friday evening, whispering secrets into the microphone as a nimble, five-piece band played behind him. "All the truth in the world adds up to one big lie," he sang, confiding that he's been "trying to get as far away from myself as I possibly can. " For all his apparent existential discomfort, however - the opening number was...
NEWS
December 20, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
AS A GLIMPSE of folk-music-obsessed Greenwich Village in the late 1950s and early '60s, "Inside Llewyn Davis" has its gritty, fleeting charms. And if the film gets people digging for discs by the late, great Dave Van Ronk, upon whom the title character is very loosely based, all the better. But as friends and fans will attest, the real Dave Van Ronk never stands up in the movie. Leading the boo-brigade is New York-based singer/songwriter Christine Lavin, a pal of the real deal and still the gracious mother hen of the urban folk/singer-songwriter scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Ask any bartender: Aside from New Year's Eve, the Night before Turkey is the busiest party night of the year. And the post-turkey weekend gobbles like crazy, too. Folks returning to their hometown for family Thanksgiving visits are trolling for a little fun with their erstwhile homies. Marrieds-with-kids find sitters and hit the town. College kids do what college kids will do. And there are those who just want to get lubricated before and/or after Thursday's turkey-centric blowout - some all the way until they hit the road/train/plane on Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1994 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a sight to behold. Toward the end of Bob Dylan's concert at the Tower Theater on Thursday night, the famously misanthropic bard allowed his flock to approach the altar. With the venue's officious security force powerless to stop them, many in the reserved-seat crowd of rowdy graybeards, grungy teens and twentysomethings rushed to fill the aisles. After a storming "Maggie's Farm" that raged like a nor'easter (and included that rarest of Dylan moments: a brief, cryptic smile)
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
CHRONICLING the recording of new music using long-lost lyrics by Bob Dylan, tonight's Showtime special "Lost Songs: The Basement Tapes Continued" will have its biggest appeal to the boomer-era fans taking in Mr. D's shows at the Academy of Music this weekend. But the target demo could be lowered by the far more "current" artists who took on this time-warping collaborative mission - Marcus Mumford (Mumford and Sons), Jim James (My Morning Jacket), Rhiannon Giddens (Carolina Chocolate Drops)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2016 | By Nick Cristiano, Staff Writer
Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams weren't exactly burning to make an album of their own. The husband-and-wife duo were content being mainly accompanists. And they didn't lack for work, whether it was with Phil Lesh or Hot Tuna or Levon Helm. And that's not counting Campbell's eight years as a guitarist for Bob Dylan, or his work as a noted Americana producer. "People finally started shaming us into it," the Tennessee-bred Williams says with a laugh from the couple's Manhattan apartment.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2015 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kinky Friedman was home at his ranch in Medina, Texas, grappling with the logistics of his forthcoming tour while facing a deadline for a proposal for his next book. "I wish I didn't suffer the curse of being multitalented," says the irrepressible musician, mystery-novel writer, and former Texas gubernatorial candidate, who also runs an animal shelter. The tour itself seems to be a grueling affair for a 70-year-old - a month-plus of one-nighters with the few days off reserved for travel.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The freewheelin' Bob Dylan is always good for a surprise on stage. The songwriting sage, now 72, has perplexed concertgoers by garbling his treasured lyrics and murkily arranging his hits into unrecognizable entities for better and worse. His never-ending tour, too, has had its share of left turns, like its summer of concerts at baseball fields. This season, Dylan's touring twist came by inviting his spiritual indie-rocking children, Wilco and My Morning Jacket, to his Americanarama Festival, which made a much-anticipated stop Sunday at Camden's Susquehanna Center.
NEWS
November 7, 2011
"Chillin' Wit . . . " is a regular feature of the Daily News spotlighting a name in the news away from the job. TOM KLINE sits at his glossy dining-room table inside his Center City apartment and sips orange juice - that he just squeezed - out of a tall, flute-like glass. The table, set against a dizzying view of the city and adorned with a silver candelabra and glass vase filled with fresh white roses and pink tiger lilies, is heaped with books about Bob Dylan. This is Tom Kline unmiked.
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