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Bob Dylan

ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Guessing what Bob Dylan might do next - and pondering why he does what he does - has been a time-consuming avocation for amateur Dylanologists for pretty much the entire half-century of his incomparably inscrutable career. On Monday, the mysterious man in the white boater hat played the Wells Fargo Center in South Philadelphia, on a double bill that also featured Mark Knopfler, the former Dire Straits front man who produced Infidels , Dylan's standout album from 1983. This date on the Never Ending Tour had a more compelling raison d'etre than most.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
WHEN IT comes to money, no one in hip-hop beats Dr. Dre . Beats, get it? Thanks to his ownership stake in the headphone company sold to Apple, Dre has finished No. 1 in Forbes ' latest list of the top earners in hip-hop. His pretax earnings? $620 million - the biggest number of any entertainer ever evaluated by Forbes , the magazine said, and more than the combined earnings of the other 24 heavy-hitters on the Hip-Hop Cash Kings list. Even among the 1 percent, there's a 1 percent.
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Levon Helm, the Arkansas-born drummer and singer for The Band, the four-fifths Canadian ensemble whose music in the 1960's and '70s, some of it with Bob Dylan, endures as a high-water mark of quintessential American rock and roll, has died of cancer. He was 71. "Levon Helm passed peacefully [Thursday] afternoon," according to an announcement on his official Website. "He was surrounded by family, friends and band mates and will be remembered by all he touched as a brilliant musician and a beautiful soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
Suddenly, it's a David Bromberg convergence: Work from his past and work from his present are hitting simultaneously. Tuesday brings the release of Only Slightly Mad , Bromberg's third album after returning in 2007 from a 22-year hiatus from recording. Also out on Tuesday is Live at Caffè Lena: Music From America's Legendary Coffeehouse, 1967-2013 , a three-disc compilation that includes a 1972 Bromberg performance of "The Holdup," an amusing song he wrote with George Harrison.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
At 66, Bettye LaVette is celebrating her 50th year in the music business. In 1962, as a Detroit teenager, she had a Top 10 R&B hit with the upbeat "My Man - He's a Lovin' Man. " Three years later, when just 19, LaVette was singing a sadder song - a classic of world-weary heartache called "Let Me Down Easy" - that also made it into the Top 20. The hits did not keep on coming. And as LaVette makes plain in her new memoir A Woman Like Me (Blue Rider Press, $26.95), the decades that followed mostly found one of America's great soul singers struggling in obscurity, victimized by bad record deals, rotten luck, and her own poor decisions.
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | by David Hinckley, New York Daily News
Over the last few years, public television has made many hopeful but cautious moves toward rock 'n' roll. Saturday, it takes its most ambitious step yet, kicking off a new series called "In the Spotlight" with a two-part, four-hour film of October's Bob Dylan tribute concert at Madison Square Garden in New York. Part One will air at 8 p.m. Saturday, Part Two at 11 p.m. Wednesday, both on Channel 12. The first part will also be repeated starting at 6:25 p.m. March 13, for those who want to see the whole thing together.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2006 | By Phaedra Trethan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joel Gilbert's three-DVD collection on Bob Dylan has almost everything a Dylanophile could want - interviews galore, candid photos, grainy home movies, inside information . . . everything, in fact, except the man himself. Dylan's voice is heard occasionally in this documentary, but not often enough. His music is performed by Gilbert's tribute band, Highway 61 Revisited, which boasts former members of Dylan's various touring bands. And Gilbert, who does most of the films' interviews and visits the troubadour's old haunts, dresses and acts the part quite a bit. But it's just not the same.
NEWS
May 29, 2011
Tom Moon is the author of 1,000 Recordings to Hear Before You Die There really is no good reason for Bob Dylan to show up for work these days. His reputation is secure. His songs occupy their own wing in the pop-culture archive. He's the rare legend who doesn't have to go out and earn any new respect - as evidenced by the gazillion "how Bob changed my life" testimonials flooding the Internet in the wake of his 70th birthday last week. Yet there he is. On the road. Performing.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1995 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Opening a three-night stand with Bob Dylan at the Electric Factory Friday, Patti Smith wandered on stage in a Unabomber-style hooded sweatshirt, lifted her long theatrical arms and sang a harrowing "Because the Night," a song she co-wrote with Bruce Springsteen that was her only top-20 hit. Before she finished this opening number, the 15 years she'd spent away from the rock-and-roll stage felt like 15 minutes. Here was a rock icon not apologizing for youthful insights or hurrying through the lyrics.
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