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Bob Dylan

ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
At 66, Bettye LaVette is celebrating her 50th year in the music business. In 1962, as a Detroit teenager, she had a Top 10 R&B hit with the upbeat "My Man - He's a Lovin' Man. " Three years later, when just 19, LaVette was singing a sadder song - a classic of world-weary heartache called "Let Me Down Easy" - that also made it into the Top 20. The hits did not keep on coming. And as LaVette makes plain in her new memoir A Woman Like Me (Blue Rider Press, $26.95), the decades that followed mostly found one of America's great soul singers struggling in obscurity, victimized by bad record deals, rotten luck, and her own poor decisions.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
Suddenly, it's a David Bromberg convergence: Work from his past and work from his present are hitting simultaneously. Tuesday brings the release of Only Slightly Mad , Bromberg's third album after returning in 2007 from a 22-year hiatus from recording. Also out on Tuesday is Live at Caffè Lena: Music From America's Legendary Coffeehouse, 1967-2013 , a three-disc compilation that includes a 1972 Bromberg performance of "The Holdup," an amusing song he wrote with George Harrison.
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | by David Hinckley, New York Daily News
Over the last few years, public television has made many hopeful but cautious moves toward rock 'n' roll. Saturday, it takes its most ambitious step yet, kicking off a new series called "In the Spotlight" with a two-part, four-hour film of October's Bob Dylan tribute concert at Madison Square Garden in New York. Part One will air at 8 p.m. Saturday, Part Two at 11 p.m. Wednesday, both on Channel 12. The first part will also be repeated starting at 6:25 p.m. March 13, for those who want to see the whole thing together.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2006 | By Phaedra Trethan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joel Gilbert's three-DVD collection on Bob Dylan has almost everything a Dylanophile could want - interviews galore, candid photos, grainy home movies, inside information . . . everything, in fact, except the man himself. Dylan's voice is heard occasionally in this documentary, but not often enough. His music is performed by Gilbert's tribute band, Highway 61 Revisited, which boasts former members of Dylan's various touring bands. And Gilbert, who does most of the films' interviews and visits the troubadour's old haunts, dresses and acts the part quite a bit. But it's just not the same.
NEWS
May 29, 2011
Tom Moon is the author of 1,000 Recordings to Hear Before You Die There really is no good reason for Bob Dylan to show up for work these days. His reputation is secure. His songs occupy their own wing in the pop-culture archive. He's the rare legend who doesn't have to go out and earn any new respect - as evidenced by the gazillion "how Bob changed my life" testimonials flooding the Internet in the wake of his 70th birthday last week. Yet there he is. On the road. Performing.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1995 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Opening a three-night stand with Bob Dylan at the Electric Factory Friday, Patti Smith wandered on stage in a Unabomber-style hooded sweatshirt, lifted her long theatrical arms and sang a harrowing "Because the Night," a song she co-wrote with Bruce Springsteen that was her only top-20 hit. Before she finished this opening number, the 15 years she'd spent away from the rock-and-roll stage felt like 15 minutes. Here was a rock icon not apologizing for youthful insights or hurrying through the lyrics.
NEWS
October 16, 1989 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
Bluesman Bob Dylan played the Tower Theater last night to a sellout crowd that alternated between standing ovations and head-scratching. Jamming with a three-piece backup band - including guitarist extraordinaire G.E. Smith, bassist Tony Garnier and drummer Chris Parker - Dylan blasted out about 90 minutes of in-your-face blues. The show was a welcome change from the Dylan hit parade that marched through town the last two times he played here. An animated Dylan - he even yelped an "oh" before a solo - went through a relatively obscure set featuring songs like "To Be Alone With You," "Tears of Rage" and the traditional folk song "The Two Soldiers," which stumped most of the crowd.
NEWS
July 13, 1987 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
The pairing of Bob Dylan and the Grateful Dead suggests an ungainly reunion of veteran bohemians, but Friday night at JFK Stadium, the combination worked surprisingly well. After a mind-bending set by the Dead and a sturdy, hits- filled outing by Dylan, the 4 1/2-hour show ended with a Dead encore featuring its new single, "Touch of Grey. " "I will survive," Jerry Garcia, the Dead's founder and psychedelic father figure, sang to a full house of mostly youthful music fans for whom the Summer of Love could just as well be the Stone(d)
LIVING
August 27, 1997 | By W. Speers This article contains material from the Associated Press, New York Times, Miami Herald, USA Today, Star and Inquirer staff writer Michael Klein
Bob Dylan will sing for Pope John Paul II next month at a Catholic Eucharistic Congress in Bologna, Italy. A Vatican spokesman said yesterday that the rock icon will be among several singers performing at a youth rally closing the congress on Sept. 27. The pope is expected to attend about 1 1/2 hours of the rally, address the young people, and stay to hear at least some of Dylan's music. "We chose him as the representative of the best type of rock," said the spokesman. "He has a spiritual nature.
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