CollectionsBob Dylan
IN THE NEWS

Bob Dylan

NEWS
November 7, 2011
"Chillin' Wit . . . " is a regular feature of the Daily News spotlighting a name in the news away from the job. TOM KLINE sits at his glossy dining-room table inside his Center City apartment and sips orange juice - that he just squeezed - out of a tall, flute-like glass. The table, set against a dizzying view of the city and adorned with a silver candelabra and glass vase filled with fresh white roses and pink tiger lilies, is heaped with books about Bob Dylan. This is Tom Kline unmiked.
NEWS
August 19, 2011 | By Dan De Luca, Inquirer Music Critic
Bob Dylan is so old and weird and vocally ravaged that there's been muttering on the Internet and in more respectable quarters that the septuagenarian bard should bring the Never-Ending Tour to an end, and hang up his rock-and-roll shoes for good. Balderdash. On Wednesday night, Dylan played the Mann Center for the Performing Arts in Fairmount Park. Sure, he often sounded like a dying bullfrog scat-singing difficult-to-decipher Bob Dylan songs. (Was that "Leopard-Skin Pillbox-Hat" he opened with, in a predictably unfamiliar arrangement?
NEWS
May 29, 2011
Tom Moon is the author of 1,000 Recordings to Hear Before You Die There really is no good reason for Bob Dylan to show up for work these days. His reputation is secure. His songs occupy their own wing in the pop-culture archive. He's the rare legend who doesn't have to go out and earn any new respect - as evidenced by the gazillion "how Bob changed my life" testimonials flooding the Internet in the wake of his 70th birthday last week. Yet there he is. On the road. Performing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2011 | Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - Bob Dylan has taken to his website to address a swirl of commentary and analysis stemming from his performance last month in Beijing, specifically responding to accusations that he sold out for adhering to what has been described as a set list vetted and approved by the Chinese government. Others criticized the singer and songwriter for not speaking out on behalf of Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. Dylan dismissed the notion that he was following anyone else's order in choosing songs for the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
"I'm Not There" has a reputation for weirdness that I'm not sure it deserves. True, it does feature a half-dozen actors playing aspects of singer/songwriter/icon Bob Dylan, and one of them is a girl, but the impressionistic movie ends up getting to the essence of its subject in a way that approaches "Ray" or "Walk the Line. " And if it does so without the conventional biopic playbook, so much the better. Good as those movies were, they were uncannily similar - which is why they are due to be parodied in a few weeks by the comedy "Walk Hard.
NEWS
November 20, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
For Todd Haynes, there was never going to be only one Bob Dylan. "There was a question of whether there should be six, or seven, or 20," says the director about I'm Not There, his perfectly titled movie about the most elusive of musical icons, in which Dylan is played by Cate Blanchett, Christian Bale, Heath Ledger, Ben Whishaw, and 11- year-old African American actor Marcus Carl Franklin. "But the idea of multiples as a way of getting to something true about him was almost plain as day," says the Far From Heaven director of the experimental biopic he conceived during a cross-country drive with a slew of Dylan tapes for company.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2006 | By Phaedra Trethan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joel Gilbert's three-DVD collection on Bob Dylan has almost everything a Dylanophile could want - interviews galore, candid photos, grainy home movies, inside information . . . everything, in fact, except the man himself. Dylan's voice is heard occasionally in this documentary, but not often enough. His music is performed by Gilbert's tribute band, Highway 61 Revisited, which boasts former members of Dylan's various touring bands. And Gilbert, who does most of the films' interviews and visits the troubadour's old haunts, dresses and acts the part quite a bit. But it's just not the same.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Bob Dylan is a doomsayer, spreading the word that trouble is on the way. He's a crusty romantic "studying the art of love," still hopeful, at 65, that "it'll fit me like a glove. " And he's a devilishly cheery troubadour with a Snidely Whiplash mustache who playfully couples "I got the pork chop, she got the pie" with "She ain't no angel, and neither am I. " Modern Times (Columbia . ?), Dylan's 44th album and his first in five years, contains multitudes. No surprise there.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2005 | By ELLEN GRAY -- Daily News Television Critic
The mental image is almost irresistible: Legendary filmmaker Martin Scorsese sitting down with legendary singer/songwriter/recluse Bob Dylan to talk about Dylan's life and times for "No Direction Home: Bob Dylan," the two-part "American Masters" that premieres on PBS tonight. Too bad it doesn't seem to have happened that way. "I've had no contact with Bob Dylan," Scorsese told reporters in Los Angeles last winter in a session at which Dylan's absence was taken for granted (though it's not uncommon for "American Masters" subjects to show up for such press conferences)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2005 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Amos Lee is going places. So many places, in fact, that he has nowhere to call home. "I've been on tour for the last year," said the soulful, 6-foot-2 singer-songwriter, back in Philadelphia for a quick breather this month before the March 1 release of his self-titled debut album on Blue Note. "I don't have a place. " Ever since Norah Jones came calling a year ago, "have guitar, will travel" has been the abiding philosophy for Lee, 27, who grew up in South Philadelphia and Kensington and spent his teenage years in Cherry Hill.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|