CollectionsBob Dylan
IN THE NEWS

Bob Dylan

ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2005 | By ELLEN GRAY -- Daily News Television Critic
The mental image is almost irresistible: Legendary filmmaker Martin Scorsese sitting down with legendary singer/songwriter/recluse Bob Dylan to talk about Dylan's life and times for "No Direction Home: Bob Dylan," the two-part "American Masters" that premieres on PBS tonight. Too bad it doesn't seem to have happened that way. "I've had no contact with Bob Dylan," Scorsese told reporters in Los Angeles last winter in a session at which Dylan's absence was taken for granted (though it's not uncommon for "American Masters" subjects to show up for such press conferences)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2005 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Amos Lee is going places. So many places, in fact, that he has nowhere to call home. "I've been on tour for the last year," said the soulful, 6-foot-2 singer-songwriter, back in Philadelphia for a quick breather this month before the March 1 release of his self-titled debut album on Blue Note. "I don't have a place. " Ever since Norah Jones came calling a year ago, "have guitar, will travel" has been the abiding philosophy for Lee, 27, who grew up in South Philadelphia and Kensington and spent his teenage years in Cherry Hill.
NEWS
August 17, 2004 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
These days, when Bob Dylan takes the stage on his Never Ending Tour - if it's Tuesday, he must be in Charleston, S.C. - he's introduced as "the poet laureate of rock-and-roll. " The songwriting bard has answered to that title since the early 1960s, when the jingle jangle of his "skipping reels of rhyme" exploded notions of pop music's creative limitations, and in the words of Bruce Springsteen, "freed your mind the way Elvis freed your body. " But do great pop songs qualify as great poems?
NEWS
April 20, 2004 | By Leslie Bennetts
My husband had just bought the newly issued CD of Bob Dylan's 1964 concert at Philharmonic Hall in New York, and our 15-year-old daughter was perplexed at yet another addition to our already extensive Dylan archive. She had never understood what made this raspy-voiced guy so important, anyway. "Why is he famous?" she asked. Delighted at the opportunity to deliver a history lesson, her father - a passionate antiwar activist during the Vietnam years - spent the next couple of hours playing old songs and explaining Dylan's seminal role in the protest music of the 1960s.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2004 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Moments before Bob Dylan walked onstage at different area venues on three successive nights this week, an anonymous announcer served up an overview of the bard's career. Through the sometimes deafening applause, you could pick up such phrases as "substance abuse" and "found God," and "who was written off as a has-been in the late '80s. " The idea, evidently, was to acquaint newcomers to the Church of Bob with his unprecedented reach, the myriad ways his music has informed and commented upon and threaded through American life during more than four trippy decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2003 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Masked and Anonymous isn't a good movie, at least by any conventional definition of the word good. But it's not a bad movie, either. It's a Bob Dylan movie. Which means that the pleasure (or pain) derived from watching it is in direct proportion to just how much of a fool for Bob Dylan you happen to be. And while it may be a slight exaggeration to say this is a Bob Dylan world, it's certainly a world full of Bob Dylan lovers, judging by the all-star cast assembled for the intentionally puzzling Larry Charles-directed saga (which looks great, despite a mere $4 million budget)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2002 | By STEVE GARY For the Daily News
It is hard for me to accept the fact that Memorial Day is upon us already, as I'm just getting ready to celebrate Easter. Area auctioneers, however, fully aware of the calendar, have scheduled several sales for the holiday - including these, which I think are worth taking a break from the picnic grill to attend. If you like rock 'n' roll, sports memorabilia, celebrity autographed items, pressed steel trucks and other old toys, then the Audubon's Auctioneers Gallery is the place to be at noon Monday.
LIVING
February 28, 1998 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES The New York Times, the New York Post and the London Evening Standard contributed to this article
For Bob Dylan, it seems, the wives, they were a-changing. The New York Post reports that one of the dino-rocker's mystery girlfriends is writing a tell-all that says Dylan secretly had at least two wives and a bevy of babies with them and other women. According to Susan Ross, Dylan has been wed not once but thrice and has "eight or nine" children - nearly twice the number listed in his latest bio. The public line is that the Grammy winner wed only Sara Lowndes and divorced in 1977, with her getting custody of their brood of five, including Jakob, the Wallflowers front man. Jakob, 26, is referred to as Dylan's youngest.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1997 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Bob Dylan has finally painted his dark-blue masterpiece. After decades wrestling with the blues, first in wordy academic exercises and more recently in spare interpretations of rural classics, the 56-year-old rock bard has poured his hard-won wisdom into an astonishing collection of blunt meditations on life and death. Time Out of Mind ( Columbia), which arrives in stores today, dwells on the human concerns that others in rock's senior division seem determined to escape: Aging.
NEWS
August 27, 1997 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
The times, they sure are a-changin.' Just a few months ago, Bob Dylan was knockin on heaven's door. Now the mumblemouthed '60s songwriting icon, recovered from a potentially fatal heart infection, has a gig next month in Italy as the opening act for the pope. That's John Paul II, minus George and Ringo. Coincidence? We think not. Turns out Il Papa's got a brand new youth rally planned on Sept. 27 in Bologna during the Catholic Eucharistic Congress. Monsignor Ernesto Vecchi said the patron saint of counterculture would be among several singers to perform at the rally, which the pontiff will headline.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|