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Bob Dylan

LIVING
August 27, 1997 | By W. Speers This article contains material from the Associated Press, New York Times, Miami Herald, USA Today, Star and Inquirer staff writer Michael Klein
Bob Dylan will sing for Pope John Paul II next month at a Catholic Eucharistic Congress in Bologna, Italy. A Vatican spokesman said yesterday that the rock icon will be among several singers performing at a youth rally closing the congress on Sept. 27. The pope is expected to attend about 1 1/2 hours of the rally, address the young people, and stay to hear at least some of Dylan's music. "We chose him as the representative of the best type of rock," said the spokesman. "He has a spiritual nature.
LIVING
August 22, 1997 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
There had to be people who came to the Mann Center for the Performing Arts Wednesday night simply to see Bob Dylan walk onto the stage, to rejoice in his health, and to share in the triumph of a survivor. Earlier this summer, Dylan gave the music world a scare when he landed in the hospital with a rare heart infection. He resumed his "Neverending Tour" three weeks ago, and though he chatted more Wednesday than he has in the past - he introduced "Shelter From the Storm" as "the Neil Young version," and thanked the crowd for coming out in what he accurately described as a "drenching" rain - he played the survivor role with characteristic understatement.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1995 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Opening a three-night stand with Bob Dylan at the Electric Factory Friday, Patti Smith wandered on stage in a Unabomber-style hooded sweatshirt, lifted her long theatrical arms and sang a harrowing "Because the Night," a song she co-wrote with Bruce Springsteen that was her only top-20 hit. Before she finished this opening number, the 15 years she'd spent away from the rock-and-roll stage felt like 15 minutes. Here was a rock icon not apologizing for youthful insights or hurrying through the lyrics.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1995 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Last week's announcement that Bob Dylan would play the Theater of Living Arts was accompanied by an explanation: Dylan, now touring stadiums with the Grateful Dead, was restless. He had days off, and wanted to play. But few in the TLA's capacity crowds Wednesday and Thursday could have been prepared for what they encountered: Dylan was being literal. Not content to stroll through his house blend of hits and back-page obscurities, he wanted to play. As in, play guitar. As in, play guitar solos.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1994 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a sight to behold. Toward the end of Bob Dylan's concert at the Tower Theater on Thursday night, the famously misanthropic bard allowed his flock to approach the altar. With the venue's officious security force powerless to stop them, many in the reserved-seat crowd of rowdy graybeards, grungy teens and twentysomethings rushed to fill the aisles. After a storming "Maggie's Farm" that raged like a nor'easter (and included that rarest of Dylan moments: a brief, cryptic smile)
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | by David Hinckley, New York Daily News
Over the last few years, public television has made many hopeful but cautious moves toward rock 'n' roll. Saturday, it takes its most ambitious step yet, kicking off a new series called "In the Spotlight" with a two-part, four-hour film of October's Bob Dylan tribute concert at Madison Square Garden in New York. Part One will air at 8 p.m. Saturday, Part Two at 11 p.m. Wednesday, both on Channel 12. The first part will also be repeated starting at 6:25 p.m. March 13, for those who want to see the whole thing together.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1991 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Music Critic
The cynic, hearing The Bootleg Series Vol. 1-3, Bob Dylan's handpicked collection of outtakes from his famous albums, groans. Obviously, here is another opportunistic singer/songwriter, riding his archives to immortality. The romantic, hearing the same music, replies: "Dylan deserves to savor every mile. " The responsible rock critic, writing in this age of complete-ism, practically is obliged to genuflect before this 58-song, three-CD, three- cassette set, then splatter adjectives all over the page.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1990 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
It seems hard to pick up a new album without encountering a John Hiatt tune. In the last few years, his songs have been recorded by Bonnie Raitt, Bob Dylan, Rosanne Cash, Marshall Crenshaw, Earl Thomas Conley, Marti Jones and a dozen or so others that slip my mind. This summer will see recent Hiatt songs covered by the Dirt Band (two tunes), Iggy Pop (yes, Iggy Pop) and Jeff Healey. Stevie Ray Vaughan, the Fabulous Thunderbirds and Dion already have Hiatt songs in reserve for future albums.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1989 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
How does it feel, seeing Bob Dylan onstage 25 years after he made the transition from the coffeehouse circuit to stardom? Much better now than it did when he was keeping concert company with the Grateful Dead and Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. The durable troubadour wowed a sold-out Tower Theater last night with a tight, fresh-sounding 90-minute show. Much of the credit goes to his current partners - ponytailed "Saturday Night Live" guitarist G.E. Smith, bassist Torry Garnier and drummer Christopher Parker.
NEWS
October 16, 1989 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
Bluesman Bob Dylan played the Tower Theater last night to a sellout crowd that alternated between standing ovations and head-scratching. Jamming with a three-piece backup band - including guitarist extraordinaire G.E. Smith, bassist Tony Garnier and drummer Chris Parker - Dylan blasted out about 90 minutes of in-your-face blues. The show was a welcome change from the Dylan hit parade that marched through town the last two times he played here. An animated Dylan - he even yelped an "oh" before a solo - went through a relatively obscure set featuring songs like "To Be Alone With You," "Tears of Rage" and the traditional folk song "The Two Soldiers," which stumped most of the crowd.
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